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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure this has been discussed in many of the 200k threads, but I'd like a more refreshed set of opinions :p

So, I think most will say putting a disk conversion on the front is almost standard unless your doing a straight out OEM restore. I guess what I'd like to know is should I do a 4-wheel disk conversion on my 351w restore?

I plan on doing a mild beefed up muscle car restore.
 

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IMO the only reason for rear disks is so they will look good behind big slotted wheels. If you can't see them through your wheels, don't bother.

MrFreeze
 

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Front disc, rear drums, unless you're doing a major amount of racing, etc..
Stan
 

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Yeah, in street driving rear discs are an indulgence, more for showing cruise nighters how much money you spent than actual braking.
 

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Another vote for keeping it simple unless you really just want to do it. Factory disc setups up front work work pretty good.
 

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I think a much bigger issue is. . .

"disk" or "disc"? :lol:
Stan
 

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Rear disc-

1) Racing
2) You hate doing maintenance on drums
3) Detroit's reasoning- "it looks cool behind wheels"
 

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Like everyone else, I'd say go for the front disc setup. That will save you money and result in the biggest braking performance increase. You can always do the rear later if you find there's $$ buring a hole in your pocket :)
 

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Does anyone on here still use the drums in the front?
Actually, for plain old driving, they're fine. Same swept area as discs, and with the mechanical advantage, less pedal effort on manual drums than manual discs. For normal stopping, or one panic stop, they work fine. If you drive hard, or run sports events, like autocross, you'll need front discs. Most people, who's hardest driving in their classic is out to get Dairy Queen, would do just fine with power drums.

I have a manual drum classic. Not gonna change it.
 

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Our '68 ran around from 4/68 until 1994 or so with front drums.
Good friction materials help a lot with drums. If you take a pass
on the cheap shoes, you'll be ok. I ran Ferodo shoes when we
lived in Colorado and on the freeways in LA until I went to K/H
4 piston front calipers.
 

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I have front drums on my car too but it's not a daily driver by any means. I put about 1k miles a year on it. The car goes out on weekends and occasionally to work (short commute).

Eventually I would like to take it to the KH factory setup...that was going to be the project this summer when I finished school but having to put a new tranny in the truck effectively ate those funds. Doh...
 

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I'm just going to use this car as cruiser car. I was just wondering since I really don't want to change the original setup on the car. I'll just upgrade to a power brake booster and better shoes and see how she handles. If I decide later to upgrade to disc in the front at lease I'll have the power booster in place already. Thanks for the input guys.
 

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Another vote for keeping it simple unless you really just want to do it. Factory disc setups up front work work pretty good.
Right on HEAP64.

To install a Costly rear Disc System is not cost effective.

The Percentage of Gain will not support effect.

So, as others has stated, Yes on Rear Disc if doing a HIGH DOLLAR arena show car.

Dan @ Chockostang
 

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I am generally fine for drums, but nearly 200ft from 60 mph is pathetic no matter how you look at it, this is from Super Chevy Magazine...

"The big question was how well our Nova would stop with all these new parts. Our first test on the original wheels was 197 feet. Just by swapping on the new tires that number dropped to 188 feet, but the drums were toast after only one hard stop. With the new hydroboost-assisted brakes and Nitto tires, we managed a best stopping distance of 128 feet! That's an improvement of 60 feet. More importantly, we made 10 max-effort stops over the course of only 7 minutes and didn't experience any brake fade. In fact, the last stop was better than the first. The peak deceleration g-force was .73 g with the old parts, .89 g with the new tires, and a whiplash-inducing 1.12 g with the new brakes and tires. The Nova also lost its tendency to randomly pull to the right or left during braking. The hydroboost has a different feel compared to a traditional booster, but after a few stops we were confidently slinging the Nova to a halt. The entire install, from start to finish, took us around 12 hours. Time well spent to bring our '60s Nova into the 21st century."


Also, the Brembo package 2011 GT is 105 feet from 60 mph.
 

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Like the fact power front disc brakes in my 68. along with larger rear drums. Couldn't say the same about the OEM style disc brakes in a 65/6. Even early articles said the drums were as good. Maybe not in rain puddles or excessive use that would cause fade. Had a scary experience in a 65 with SSBC factory style 4 piston caliper discs-complete kit. For daily use in today's faster moving traffic, at least in the metropolitan area where I live, not good.
Feel that a 65-6 needs better discs than OEM style in front and possibly, larger drums in the rear. Opinion.
 

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Possibly a minor consideration for someone on a budget parking/"emergency" brake. With rear disc brakes it's a new ballgame.
 

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Like the fact power front disc brakes in my 68. along with larger rear drums. Couldn't say the same about the OEM style disc brakes in a 65/6. Even early articles said the drums were as good. Maybe not in rain puddles or excessive use that would cause fade. Had a scary experience in a 65 with SSBC factory style 4 piston caliper discs-complete kit. For daily use in today's faster moving traffic, at least in the metropolitan area where I live, not good.
Feel that a 65-6 needs better discs than OEM style in front and possibly, larger drums in the rear. Opinion.
New versions of 65-65 brakes are available in power version. The OE 65-66 disc brakes were all manual. That said, the feedback I have received from our customers is that their manual 65-66 type disc brake swap had made a world of difference in stopping, fade resistance, and straight stopping. Perhaps a good drum brake rebuild would have been just as good; I don't believe so.
 

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Couldn't say the same about the OEM style disc brakes in a 65/6. Even early articles said the drums were as good. Maybe not in rain puddles or excessive use that would cause fade. Had a scary experience in a 65 with SSBC factory style 4 piston caliper discs-complete kit. Feel that a 65-6 needs better discs than OEM style in front and possibly, larger drums in the rear. Opinion.
Probably SSBC's crappy pads. The K/H calipers are definitely a proven item.
The small Mustang ones are good and the larger Galaxie ones are better.
My issue with the early Mustang ft disc setup is those rotors. They're
pretty marginal from a proper design standpoint. Ventilation isn't great
to begin with and that huge pad retaining gizmo doesn't make things any
better in that respect.
 
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