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Here is an example of a 1969-1970 Metuchen VIN stamping.



Her is an older thread with a newer response about visability and strange VIN stamping from the Metuchen plant.
 

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Looking around the WEB is seems most 69/70 VIN stamps are under the fenders in the location I have indicated. But, there are several photos (most of them from this forum) that show the fender in place, and a partial or complete VIN visible. There are also several comments about mis-stamped VIN's that may be legit, or an effort to cover up the true VIN.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
So then one more question, if i have located the one that i posted a pic of before, should i assume that is it or there is another one?

Attached pic of one I found, but this one is toward the very front of the car. This is well forward of shock tower. This would be the one in the "cutout area" but there is no cut out.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
You can see in that pic i just posted the VIN clearly matches, just that pesky 6. If i only had someone who understood that and could use reason and give me the proper VIN on title and reg.

Its there.....
 

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So then one more question, if i have located the one that i posted a pic of before, should i assume that is it or there is another one?

Attached pic of one I found, but this one is toward the very front of the car. This is well forward of shock tower. This would be the one in the "cutout area" but there is no cut out.
I personally have never seen a 69/70 with a VIN forward of the shock tower metal.

Over on Concours Mustang Forum, there is talk about some early Mustangs from Metuchen having 3 VIN stamps. 1 visible (usually by the master brake cylinder) and the other two under the front fenders (exact location not specified). So there is a possibility you might have 2 more VIN stamps under the fenders.

69/70 Mustangs did not have a "cutout" area that made the apron VIN's visible. It seems they wanted you to rely on the cowl/dash VIN.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
Interesting. I will look again when i go next.

I should assume nothing at this point, but with the stamping wrong on the one in the front, I am guessing the others would match, but obviously only one way to find out.
 

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You can see in that pic i just posted the VIN clearly matches, just that pesky 6. If i only had someone who understood that and could use reason and give me the proper VIN on title and reg.

Its there.....
One more note: from a post over on Concours Mustang Forum: Cars with 3 VIN stamps

One in front of the shock towers - drivers side

Two behind the shock towers - one each side

As mention "hesitation" stampings (stampings not made deep enough to be seen so they were redone) were some times seen as mention - they were the practice on some later Mustangs depending on plant.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Cool, i will look behind shock towers underneath each side...then if have to start loosening bolts.

Hoping for best.
 

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Before you start pulling off fenders, please remove the dash pad and look for the original dash VIN tag. Don't give up on dash tag that until confirming that it's missing. It may be tucked under a replacement pad, it may be broken loose and trapped somewhere in the dash area.
 

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Huzzah! I hate these "my VIN is weird/missing" stories. This one had a happy ending, but we've seen a few horror stories that made me feel terrible for the fraud victim.
 

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No rivet tool is required. A flat ended rod, bolt, or pin is all that's needed. What you need to do is flatten, not pierce, the hump inside the rivet.

However, you are laboring under a misconception. The plate on the door is NOT a VIN plate, and in fact has no legal status whatsoever. It even says so, right on the tag, which in reality is a Warranty Tag, used only by dealers to identify trim, paint, and certain options...

View attachment 738577

The legal VIN on a 69 Mustang is at the front edge of the dash pad, visible through the windshield.

View attachment 738578
Try telling that to my state's vehicle inspection department. I was forced to blue tag my 67 because during restoration, we discovered the VIN on the title didn't match the fender apron stamp, but rather the door tag. So I ordered a new, correct door tag from Marti, put it on the car, and then took it in for inspection to get everything synced up. They tried to claim I was committing fraud, saying you can't replace door tags, and made me blue tag my car with a state issued VIN. I'm still thinking about fighting it for my car's sake.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Thats weird. I would think the door plate on a 67 is the legal identifier. From what I understood.

I have to bring my.67 up there. Hopefully we doesnt need to match it to fender, that is not visable and I am jot loosenig fender to look. No chance.
 

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This is a dumb question, I get that. But I need to attach a door VIN plate to a car I purchased to get the vin inspection done. Hopefully tomorrow. The replacment plate from ford (marti) is with it, old one lost when painted. Buck plate is there with correct vin, but I need to get this door plate attached.

This is a 69 mach 1, not that that matter, but just in case. I have been asking around for a rivet tool, but havent found someone yet.

Is the rivet snd tool all one standard size? I have very limited experience with rivets and rivet tools.

Is this just a quick attach with standard rivet gun?

Please let me know if there is anything I should know before attempting.

Thanks.
Gorilla Glue//Super Glue
 

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Thats weird. I would think the door plate on a 67 is the legal identifier. From what I understood.
Nope. The tag on the door is a "Warranty Tag", intended only for dealer service information. Says so right on the tag. I always wondered why so often government officials can't read.

739075
 

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...we discovered the VIN on the title didn't match the fender apron stamp...
That means you have a car without a title. Whoever sold the car and presented that title as being valid committed fraud. If a title is required to drive the car in your State, then you must either accept a State-issued VIN or find a way to title the car using the VIN stamped on the inner fender. I'd personally pursue the latter if possible, even if it takes a longer and costs more money to accomplish.

I would think the door plate on a 67 is the legal identifier.
Doors are not a legal requirement to drive a car on the street, much less claim ownership. A windshield, hood, trunk, or roof are also not required. These are all just detachable, replaceable parts attached to the thing we call a "car". I see Jeeps, Broncos, and Blazers driving without those "frilly extras" almost every day in the Summer.

And if you don't have doors, where do you attach the legal VIN tag?

Abstractly, a legal VIN tag/stamp must be permanently attached to the main part which defines the "thing". Everything else attached to that main "thing" is optional. Can you easily replace a part yet still have a functional car? If so, then that part wasn't the "main thing" defining the car. Granted, some pretty strange places and methods where used on cars back when wooden wheels and steam engines where commonplace. But auto-makers pretty much figured things out since then.

Since the universal adoption of dash VIN tags in 1968, what was once common sense has slowly become super-obscure-expert knowledge. My Dad and Grandad both taught me to look at the inner fender VIN stamp when buying used cars. Nobody thought the door warranty tag was a legal VIN back in the early 1980s! Me and my buddies pulled many doors off junk cars back in our mid-teens. We just removed the tag from the door, fixed the rust, painted, hung it, and drove the car. It was common practice back then. Tons cheaper than buying a new door.
 
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