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Discussion Starter #1
I want to get a power meter installed at the garage where my house burned. Previously, I pulled power from the house via underground cable. Now, in order to get the meter set, I have to pull wire from the panel at the southeast corner of the garage to the northeast corner where they say I must install the meter. So I'll have to have the wire, and whatever hardware required to install the receiver for the meter. Any idea what all this should run?
 

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Hard to say. Is it overhead or underground service? 100 amp service is very common and as such the reflect it making it the cheapest. You will need to install a disconnect at the meter as the local and utility inspector won't allow the wire to be run without it. You don't need a fused disconnect but you might as well play it safe and install a fused one. For the 2020 NEC you will be required for a service disconnect no matter what. You'll probably have to install 2 grounding rods.

Off hand I'll say close to $1k. Check with local inspector to see what year NEC code they're going by. In NJ as of April 2020 they finally adopted the 2017 NEC. NYC is still operating on the 2008 NEC.
 

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Last time I did one the electric co supplied the meter base at least.
 

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All I need for my shop is the power run from the house to the garage (barely 40 feet) and I was quoted 2K. I thought that was nuts. Called a few other places and apparently that was the going rate.

Duke power charged me $980 to relocate approximately 100' of line out from under my garage foundation to run next to it, and supposedly that was a heavily discounted rate?

This is all recent, within the last 6-8 months.
 

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If you trench it yourself, you can save a lot of money.
Find an electrician, tell him that you will trench it (he'll love you for that) and see what he wants to pull the cable and connect it.
I would think most electricians would jump at that job because it is simple and clean.
Heck, they might even let you pull the cable for them, saving more money.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Actually, no digging, Wiseguy. Previously the shop was powered by an underground cable from the house that burned. Now I just have to remove the previous supply line and route new cable up the wall, through the top-plate, across the ceiling and down to where it will enter the building. I would do it all myself but I don't know the code or what exactly parts are required and what their proper install is supposed to look like.
 

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I would think most electricians would jump at that job because it is simple and clean
Not to hijack to much but change electrician to plumber, And yesterday I got a $ 200+ bill to change out an expansion tank by my hot water tank. Couple of inch and something wrenches and less than 20 minutes later it was done. And I already had the tank. I did not have big enough wrenches and to his credit he did say it was tight AF.
 

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Not to hijack to much but change electrician to plumber, And yesterday I got a $ 200+ bill to change out an expansion tank by my hot water tank. Couple of inch and something wrenches and less than 20 minutes later it was done. And I already had the tank. I did not have big enough wrenches and to his credit he did say it was tight AF.
Service calls typically include portal to portal time. Meaning the clock starts when they leave the shop and stops when they get back. They also have the cost of the service truck and shop overhead to consider. Yep it adds up.

Electrical companies, especially for commercial work, will sometimes amortize the cost of the bringing service to a new building into the rate charged so that they get reimbursed over time. (Often called a "demand contract") They know a new user will use power than thus be a bill payer. For repair or relocation work? No new power user is generated, so they charge for their connection services.
 

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Do you have future plane for the house site?
You can get away with a few things with a temporary power pole depending on where the service drop comes from.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
"Do you have future plane for the house site? You can get away with a few things with a temporary power pole depending on where the service drop comes from."

Hmm... That's a thought!
 

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All I need for my shop is the power run from the house to the garage (barely 40 feet) and I was quoted 2K. I thought that was nuts. Called a few other places and apparently that's
Service calls typically include portal to portal time. Meaning the clock starts when they leave the shop and stops when they get back. They also have the cost of the service truck and shop overhead to consider. Yep it adds up.

Electrical companies, especially for commercial work, will sometimes amortize the cost of the bringing service to a new building into the rate charged so that they get reimbursed over time. (Often called a "demand contract") They know a new user will use power than thus be a bill payer. For repair or relocation work? No new power user is generated, so they charge for their connection services.
I had to explain that to my sister recently, almost the exact same situation. Some problem with water heater, simple fix, but was like $200. I told her the company that guy works for has to also pay him to drive to and from your house and there's usually a minimum charge amount to cover that time.

When I was a field engineer, I got paid for office, drive, and field time, and we also charged mileage. Depending on where it was (some trips were 2 hours each way) a client that far away might be charged $300 for a 30 minute site visit. We were always up front with fees, so that was never a surprise to our clients.
 

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All I need for my shop is the power run from the house to the garage (barely 40 feet) and I was quoted 2K. I thought that was nuts. Called a few other places and apparently that's
I trenched laid the conduit and pulled the wire myself as well as ran it into the garage and the house and pulled it into the sub panel and the box in the house. Then all I needed to pay for was to have the electrician come and hook it up inside the house and in the garage.
 
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