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Discussion Starter #1
I probably already know the answer to this, I just need some reinforcement from the engine experts here. The 289 is in the shop getting rebuilt. It has been tanked and now is going to be heat-treated to completely clean all the paint, rust, and dirt off. One of the shop's owners recommended that the engine be balanced as part of the rebuild. It's an extra $170 on top of the $1,500 rebuild cost. The other owner said because I don't drive the car that much I don't really need the balancing. However, I used to have people in my car question whether the car had stalled because it ran so smoothly, but over the last couple of years it began to vibrate noticeably. I assume that this is due to a lack of balance. Should I spring for that extra $170?

[color:red]1968 Coupe, "Murphy" - Original (car and owner)</font color=red>
[color:blue]1968 Fastback, "Trouble" - Restomod
[color:red]1967-1968 MCA Certified Judge</font color=red>


See Trouble at http://www.rtd.com/~aztlan/stang.htm</font color=blue>
 

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Does the rebuild include new pistons?
Anyway, I would have it balanced. Why bother $1500 rebuild if not done well, even if you drive it sparingly. Balancing doesn't wear out even if you don't drive. Think it as an investment.

Door handle first when cornering
 

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Balance it! It's only $170 and it'll make the engine run smoother at higher RPMs and last longer. I had mine balanced and there was never a question about it. IMO, the only way to do something is to do it right and with an engine that means balancing it. Your vibrations are probably external though, the balancer maybe. Take a hard look at it.

Black primer 66 coupe, bench seat, 302, C-4, 3.55 TSD.
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You want that damn medallion? Okay...what happens when you drive Murph off the trailer and the engine blows up due to being imbalanced?

Balance the engine. Once the car is retired, you can start to drive it again regularly, and re-restore it in another 35 years.

Thanks for allowing me to spend your money.

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If you are planning on a quick sell then don't balance but if you want to keep the car (which I know you do :) ) then it is worth the extra money.

Paul
1965 Mustang 2+2
1989 Mustang GT Convertible
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MCA certified judge for 65's and late models
 
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The reason your engine began running less smoothly as it aged is probably due to simple wear and mileage-not a balance problem. The balancing issue really comes into play as RPM's increase-generally in a racing or way high performance street capacity-at 8000+ an unbalanced engine will take itself out in short order (if not on the spot). If your not using the engine for really high rpm/heavy duty use- you can probably use the $170 for something better-on the other hand if your made of money you might tell the difference on normal street use-bottom line-it was never "balanced" in the shops' definition when it came from the factory.

Raven Black 66 Fastback GT, 289 A Code, PS, C-4, AC
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I agree with raven66. They were not balanced from the factory, and it only matters if you're building the engine up. I elected not to balance my current engine in my '66, as it was just going to be a street driven engine. Now that this engine is being transplanted to the '65, the new engine is being balanced, since it will be a much higher revving monster *LOL*.

You will have to have all your "ducks in a row" if you decide to balance, as the flywheel/flexplate and harmonic balancer that will be on the engine must be balanced along with it, so you must alreay have those pieces and send them on over to the machine shop.

If you always do what you've always done,
You'll always get what you've always got

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Discussion Starter #8
The machine shop just called and said the rubber is shot on the harmonic balancer (surprise, surprise). They are sending it to a place in California to get it restored to original condition. The rebuild does include a new cam and new pistons. Gee, my car is spread out from coast to coast.

[color:red]1968 Coupe, "Murphy" - Original (car and owner)</font color=red>
[color:blue]1968 Fastback, "Trouble" - Restomod
[color:red]1967-1968 MCA Certified Judge</font color=red>


See Trouble at http://www.rtd.com/~aztlan/stang.htm</font color=blue>
 
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Laurie -

The new balancer is the most likely culprit for you imbalance woes. When I rebuilt my motor last year, I had the harmonic balancer redone too (probably by the same people in CA). Costs about $100 and they did a great job.

I'd spring for the extra $170 and get the engine balanced. Mechanical items and vibration equal fatigue, regardless of the structural safety margins.

Thanks,

Mike
'66 Springtime Yellow Coupe
289, slightly warmed over
driven daily
 

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Usually, either the loss of a balance weight, deterioration of the harmonic balancer or worn/damaged motor/trans mounts account for the majority of engine vibration complaints...

As the imbalance on your vibration damper is fixed and not affected by the worn rubber, if the engine ran smoothly before and you noted no damage to parts and you plan on keeping the rpms under 5K, dynamic/static balancing, at over 10% of the cost of your engine, may not be warranted....

The stock, unbalanced (other than factory) shortblock in my D-coder sees 5K occasionally and runs nice and smooth...not as silky as the engine in the race car, but then I don't expect a stocker to run like a $5K racing engine..*G*

Pat
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Sounds like you found the source of your vibration. I wouldn't go any further with balancing unless you have some high RPM fast driving on Murphy's agenda, which I believe you don't.
BTW, was the the first rebuild on this engine and how many miles? Would be curious to hear how the internals did for wear.

Vintage Burgundy 1966 Mustang GT Fastback (Midlife's younger brother)
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I would balance it. I didn't balance mine and I'm sorry that I didn't - at the higher rpms (such as on the highway) I can feel a slight vibration - probably not noticeable to anyone else, but it bugs me incessantly.

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes, this is the first rebuild. The only other thing I've had done was to replace the timing chain about 15 years ago. The odometer shows a little over 99,000 miles, but it has always been fast and I believe the actual mileage is about 96,000 (some of those are real hard miles, however). The rebuild came out of the restoration goal for the car and the fact that at least one of the lifters had collapsed. With that problem, the fact that the car does not get much driving time, and the mileage, it seemed like a good time to do the rebuild. Cosmetically and performance-wise, the 289 will be like new, or even better than new. Also, the hardened seats will be a plus for future driving.

[color:red]1968 Coupe, "Murphy" - Original (car and owner)</font color=red>
[color:blue]1968 Fastback, "Trouble" - Restomod
[color:red]1967-1968 MCA Certified Judge</font color=red>


See Trouble at http://www.rtd.com/~aztlan/stang.htm</font color=blue>
 

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I don't know if this survey did any help. 6-5 for balance, but if you weigh the votes by experience, it might be other way round. Tell us, what you decided.

Door handle first when cornering
 
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whether your selling the car or not have it balanced! Even if you are selling the car I'd have it balanced. Isn't there such a thing as pride or honesty anymore!

Do it once, do it right!

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by 1970coupe on 04/26/01 07:31 AM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I noticed how the survey came out, too, interesting split. Although my coupe is shown as trailered concours, it is licensed and I do drive it now and then. I also love to rev it up when I actually do have it on the road. Bottom line, I believe I will spring for the balancing because that way I know everything has been done and the engine will be set for a long time--hopefully another 33 years. *G*

[color:red]1968 Coupe, "Murphy" - Original (car and owner)</font color=red>
[color:blue]1968 Fastback, "Trouble" - Restomod
[color:red]1967-1968 MCA Certified Judge</font color=red>


See Trouble at http://www.rtd.com/~aztlan/stang.htm</font color=blue>
 
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