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1966 coupe 289 with a newer 302
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there! I sanded a small part of my engine bay with a steel brush on my drill. Then I applied rust o leum. Then I degreased it, then I cleaned it with water and then I applied high heat matt black paint. It looks quite different than the rest of the engine bay now. Do you have any thoughts about why and if I can get a better result? Thanks!
 

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It appears the high heat matt black isn't at all like the factory paint. You can find many discussions online about paint for a Mustang engine compartment that best matches the factory sheen. Basically, there was a Krylon rattle can paint that was a very good match, but it's no longer available. (Well, some people have managed to get it from industrial suppliers, but then I've read that no works either.)

Anyway, you can get some single stage enamel at your local paint store and add flattener until it's just the way you like it. But that's very expensive. What worked best for me is the "Duplicolor Low Gloss Black" in a rattle can. You can find it at most auto parts stores. What's nice is I can touch it up any time with another can of that stuff and it matches nicely. Be aware the factory engine compartment paint on my 1970 Mach 1 was a little more glossy than on earlier Mustangs I've seen. So, by all means, buy a few different paints and experiment. Go with what you like.
 

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There are a million shades of black and you are trying to match what could be 50 year old paint. You might find a shade from a different manufacturer that comes close. I have successfully mixed Duplicolor and Rustoleum black lacquers (very different colors) to achieve a particular shade, but that requires spraying from each aerosol can into a container and then shooting the mix out of my airbrush. In all honesty, the entire panel should be stripped and re-shot. with one or the other or another paint of your choosing,.
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1966 coupe 289 with a newer 302
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Discussion Starter #5
Oh, good point above. If you're trying the match the existing paint, that's not going to happen. Scuff, scuff, scuff the entire engine compartment. Clean, clean, clean. Prime, prime, prime. Then apply the top coat for a nice, even look.
Thanks for this insight! Will I need to remove the engine for this job? Or can I leave it in? How much work is your recommended aporoach?
 

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That depends on your ambitions! I had my motor out and wanted to redo the engine bay. It had been painted before and someone did a really bad job. I started wire wheeling and then noticed the radiator support and front side panels were bent up from a crash that happened in the past so I cut those out to replace too.





 

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The engine compartment can be refinished without removing the engine. I stripped mine to bare metal in four sessions, priming at the end of each session. I did remove every component that was attached to the surfaces (including wiring) and when it was all ready, I shot the color in 1 day, let it dry and reassembled. Start to finish, it was not a week.
751081
 

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"Matt Black" is also known as "Flat Black". The engine compartment was originally finished in a SEMI-GLOSS. There is no need for a "high heat" paint either. An excellent choice would be a couple coats of black epoxy primer directly to prepped bare metal. The finish is pretty close to original or you could top coat it for a bit more protection with a Ditzler/PPG# 9295.
 

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The engine compartment can be refinished without removing the engine. I stripped mine to bare metal in four sessions, priming at the end of each session. I did remove every component that was attached to the surfaces (including wiring) and when it was all ready, I shot the color in 1 day, let it dry and reassembled. Start to finish, it was not a week. View attachment 751081
Turned out nice, very nice!
 

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1966 coupe 289 with a newer 302
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Discussion Starter #10
The engine compartment can be refinished without removing the engine. I stripped mine to bare metal in four sessions, priming at the end of each session. I did remove every component that was attached to the surfaces (including wiring) and when it was all ready, I shot the color in 1 day, let it dry and reassembled. Start to finish, it was not a week. View attachment 751081
This looks epic! Brand new! What kind of engine am I looking at here? And... what is that part in the lower right of the engine? On the photo just above the radiator cap. I don’t have that there :)
 

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1968 coupe, 1968 vert, 1966 coupe
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Well ya you’ll need to do the whole engine bay and once you yang the engine and start to clean it up you’re going to be down the rabbit hole with about 1 million other projects to do... my first question though is why you used rustoleum
 

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A hole is the only thing that gets bigger, the more you take away from it.

My plan was a scuff and repaint. The wiring is out, the booster/MC is coming out, the grill is coming out, the fenders are coming off.

This afternoon as I was unbolting the MC I thought that I keep taking things apart and Im not putting anything back together.

Where does it all end?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well ya you’ll need to do the whole engine bay and once you yang the engine and start to clean it up you’re going to be down the rabbit hole with about 1 million other projects to do... my first question though is why you used rustoleum
I thought it might help to remove any remaining rust? Not smart?
 

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I thought it might help to remove any remaining rust? Not smart?
Personally I would’ve wire wheeled the rust or sanded it off. Then a primer then paint. I feel like rustoleum just gives a different finish
 

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1966 coupe 289 with a newer 302
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Discussion Starter #17
Personally I would’ve wire wheeled the rust or sanded it off. Then a primer then paint. I feel like rustoleum just gives a different finish
Ok! I sanded first and the I did rustoleum just to be sure. Inside the car I have found some sports that I think have been treated with rustoleum. That indeed looks different.
 

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There's nothing wrong with Rustoleum. You have a wide choice of spray cans from them at the big box stores and they are reasonably priced. They sell a nice etching primer to lay down as a very lite coat on bare metal first, then some choice of grey primer, then a semi flat top coat. It is advisable to stick with one product line. Yours has clearly been painted before, i see fisheye pops and sanding scratchs, if it is bonded well you may be able to prep it just enough to repaint over top of it at this time...Plan a bigger engine bay redo for when you pull the motor..keep researching what others have done.
 
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