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Discussion Starter #1
Did Ford use various grades of fasteners according to the job they did or did they use grade 8 on everything?

Im putting my 250 together and Im missing a bunch of fastners for things like the WP, front cover, alt bracket, coil bracket, starter, bell to block.

Are hardware store grade 2 bolts suitable?

Ive got the factory fasteners for the high torque / high tensile items like the crank caps, cam, flexplate, rods, balancer and engine mounts.

Its not about cost, its maybe $10-15 difference, its more about ease of finding the proper length bolts.
 

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You'll be hard pressed to find correct engine fasteners at hardware stores. It's not that they aren't strong enough. The problem is they aren't the right length and they almost never have the correct head so you have to use washers and that doesn't always work.

I would highly recommend getting an ARP fastener kit for your engine. Although, I admit I'm not sure if they're available for the I-6. Check on the NPD web site. Seriously, the ARP kits are a lifesaver.
 

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I’ve gotten a few of the fastener kits. Expensive but so nice to have the right stuff for the job.
+2 on AMK kits. Im pretty sure I got a box with the 69 I picked up at Christmas. It has a 250, so I may be able to help with pics of things for you. Let me know.
 

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Buy ARP fasteners and be done with it. The great thing about low grade hardware store bolts is after a few years they like to break off when you try to remove them.

+2 on AMK kits.
Who mentioned AMK kits? Pretty sure someone has to mention it first for a +2 to be added :)
 

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Original fasteners are very important to a restoration. they are nothing like hardware store bolts. It all depends on if you are restoring the car or not. I cannot stand non-original fender bolts, it just what of my pet peeves, even on modified cars. Some original bolts are zinc plated and some are black oxide. If the car is being judged the correct bolt with the correct finish needs to be used.

Most original bolts do not have a grade marking on them. I would not use grade 2 on anything. You can use grade 5 on all body bolts. Grade 8 on suspension and steering parts. Engine parts depend on which bolts were talking about.

A lot of factory bolts are special and are specifically designed with integral washers and shoulders between the heads and threads.

I build 1940s hot rods so the bolts need to be authentic. I was told that bolt grades were not put on bolt heads until 1957. That was one of the changes the Society of Engineers made that year but it only applied to aftermarket bolts. If I do not have an original bolt on one of my hot rod projects and I need to use a grade 8 bolt I remove the grade 8 markings from it. Otherwise my vintage hot rod friends will pick on me. It might seem silly but people look at stuff like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This car is just a fun hobby. No worries about originality. Safety of course is the #1 priority, otherwise the sky is the limit.

I have all the hardware I took off the donor 250, the important stuff I bagged and labeled. The rest of it is in a vat of Dawn, then it will go into evaporust. Once cleaned up, I will salvage what I can and reuse, but Im pretty sure that I will be missing some hardware. Im buying head studs. I think the block was decked, Im going to shave the head, so instead of sweating if the bolts are to long, I will go the easy route.
 
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Concours Mustang has a series of spreadsheets where they’ve tried to catalog most of the sizes.


I’ve used several non factory fasteners. Depending on the application I use either grade 5 and some grade 8. Depending on which way the stress is applied to the fastener in many if not most cases grade 5 is plenty. Grade 5 is the stock grade my supplier carries as well as grade 8 (no grade 2 cheapies). I’m using Grattan or PFC most of the time. There are some cases where you’ll need to use the factory fastener but there are many where the generic substitute will work just fine though as noted lengths might not be quite right or the heads will be different.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How much stress is on the bolts holding the timing cover or coil under?

Rotating assembly, engine mounts, transmission, cylinder head are all high torque/ load parts, but Im thinking there are areas where I can take shortcuts without compromising safety or appearance.

I will see what I end up missing and go from there. Im planning on painting the engine just as the factory would have, so everything will be blue anyway.
 

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If there is stress on your timing cover, then you have an issue. Grade 5 bolts are more than acceptable. I believe a lot of the factory bolts for these areas were Grade 3.
 

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Hardware is my biggest pet peeve. Either ARP or factory original style. IMO nothing says "I half assed this thing" like hardware store bolts in any place on a car. I even bought the chemicals and re coated some of mine.
 

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Hardware is my biggest pet peeve. Either ARP or factory original style. IMO nothing says "I half assed this thing" like hardware store bolts in any place on a car. I even bought the chemicals and re coated some of mine.
I guess it's to each his own. I could see that if you're building a concurs or show car but not for a daily driver. I, myself, don't have OCD and don't plan on spending that much time/money/effort to make any of my daily drivers "period correct" or factory original.
 

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Most of the visible hardware on my car has been replaced with the appropriate grade of stainless steel stuff.
 

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Take it from someone who knows - if you assemble your motor with the wrong bolts with the wrong length threads / wrong length shoulder, you could crack things like the timing cover. I've done it before (and I wasn't even using a hardware store bolt, I just put the wrong bolt in the wrong hole in the timing cover and snapped off an ear because the bolt shoulder was too long).

It is fine to reuse a lot of stuff like the timing cover and water pump bolts. My rule is that if it takes less than 30 ft/lbs of torque, then you can probably reuse it because it is not a high-pressure application. But I wouldn't fill in hardware store bolts for missing bolts in the motor. Find the right bolts to replace missing hardware so you don't end up with improperly assembled parts or weird leaks.

Now when it comes to other hardware elsewhere in the car in noncritical places - like the screws to hold in interior trim - yeah, my car is totally full of Home Depot screws and assorted hardware that I found laying on the ground in the road :p If they fail, the worst case scenario is that an interior panel falls off. If an engine bolt fails... usually it's not great news, because you'll either hurt the motor or hurt yourself trying to drill the dang thing out!
 
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