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Help! I’ve been looking at pics and articles of 200ci engines and cant find a solution. There two prongs sticking out in front of the engine, and I cant figure out what it’s for, any ideas? Attached are two pics...

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1973 Ford Mustang Grande 351C
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If it has three vacuum fittings on it, one goes to the intake for vacuum, one goes to the carb, and one to the distributor. From top to bottom, carb, dist, intake.

I would find the vacuum diagram for your particular year mustang. That will eliminate any confusion.
 

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67 Fastback T5, 331 stroker, TCI Frt End, Canted 4 link rear, 3.55 gears
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Ported Vacuum Switches (PVS) are heat sensitive devices that turn vacuum pressure on or off to vacuum related components such as EGR valves or distributor advance mechanisms. Can be found on intake manifold, water outlets or engine block.
 

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Ford gave it a fancy name, something like Distributor Vacuum Control Valve.
Below a certain temperature it directs "ported" vacuum to the distributor vacuum advance canister. With ported vacuum there is no vacuum with the engine at idle and therefore no vacuum advance.
If the coolant reaches a certain higher temperature the DVCV changes and directs "manifold" vacuum to the distributor vacuum advance canister. Since there is manifold vacuum with the engine idling the distributor vacuum advance canister is activated and the advanced timing causes the engine rpm to increase which causes the fan to spin faster and bring the coolant temperature back down.
Before the DVCV was invented Ford/Autolite put hot idle compensators (Klutch mentioned it) on the carb to increase the rpm when the carb got hot.
 

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Ford gave it a fancy name, something like Distributor Vacuum Control Valve.
Below a certain temperature it directs "ported" vacuum to the distributor vacuum advance canister. With ported vacuum there is no vacuum with the engine at idle and therefore no vacuum advance.
If the coolant reaches a certain higher temperature the DVCV changes and directs "manifold" vacuum to the distributor vacuum advance canister. Since there is manifold vacuum with the engine idling the distributor vacuum advance canister is activated and the advanced timing causes the engine rpm to increase which causes the fan to spin faster and bring the coolant temperature back down.
Before the DVCV was invented Ford/Autolite put hot idle compensators (Klutch mentioned it) on the carb to increase the rpm when the carb got hot.
This is correct, and virtually quotes the Manual.
 
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