Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey guys i have a 72 v8 302 and that engine needs rebuilt what i was wondering is if i buy a engine from advanced auto parts and put my performer intake and cam and my hooker headers on one of there engines would i get good performance also i had people tell me at there store to get one of the 1990 engines from like the mustang gt's and put my carb and stuff on those they said the performance would be unbeleievable???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
There is minimal difference between a 1990's 302 block and a 1968 302 block (or simply a 289 block stroked). When you put your intake and carb on a 1990 5.0 I can't imagine gaining anything other than a little strength in the metal and that's just a guess.

Depending on what state you're in this may have a resounding effect on your inspection as well. I know at least some states base emissions on the year the engine block was cast, NOT the year the car was made. If you are in one of those states, expect to have to add catalytic converters and various smog junk to make your car legal. Of course, all this eats power.

If you want to be super cool however, drop a 5.0 EFI engine in your Mustang. If I had the money and the means, I'd go that route in a second.

-Aaron

Houston, TX - 67 Fastback in restoration. A-code, C-4, 9" Traction-Loc rear.

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe" - Carl Sagan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,134 Posts
If you decide to get a remanufactured engine you might wish to research the compression ratio. When I did my latest engine in '93 I did just that and I found that the remanufactured engines, at that time anyway, were running 8.0 to 8.5:1 compression. Based on that I went with a local shop that built a 9.5:1 short block for me. IT cost more but I don't think I would have been happy with those numbers. Just a thought.

...modified '65 convertible...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
A 1990 5.0 block has noticeable design improvements compared to a 1968 302 block. A 90 block has one piece rear oil seal, a roller cam and forged pistons. The design improvements tip the scales in favor of the 90 block although the 68 block might be the stronger casting.

"What we have here is--failure to communicate."

67 GTA (clone) coupe soon to be 5.0L w/Edelbrock 1406
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
I should have made my argument a little more clear. When rebuilding an older model vs. buying a remanufactured late model, the differences become moot and I REALLY doubt that the "performance (difference) would be unbelievable" as the guys at the shop would like him to believe. Really, I doubt there'd be any difference at all.

Unless the block needs lots of machine work, it's pretty easy and cheap to add forged pistons, roller cam, etc. Those remanufactured engines are not cheap at all.

I kinda assumed that the late-model block would have a stronger casting but that was a guess. Were older blocks really stronger? Why is that? I assumed that the modern alloys would be better than the old.

-Aaron

Houston, TX - 67 Fastback in restoration. A-code, C-4, 9" Traction-Loc rear.

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe" - Carl Sagan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
I agree w/your points. I'm guessing bflem55 meant 'performance potential' instead of 'performance difference'. It's almost a wash comparing costs between a remanufactured engine and new short block. Some older blocks have higher nickel content than newer blocks. The nickel provides added strength. IRC Coast High Performance uses older blocks for their strokers.

"What we have here is--failure to communicate."

67 GTA (clone) coupe soon to be 5.0L w/Edelbrock 1406
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top