Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,041 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well,

in the past I have:

1. taken the engine ~and transmission out
2. taken just the transmission (auto) out (left the engine in)
3. taken just the transmission (manual) out (left the engine in)
4. taken ~just the engine out, left the (auto) transmission in. (aka, the flywheel to torque converter nuts have to be removed).

This weekend (hopefully) I will be

taking ~just the engine out, leaving the (manual) transmission in.

Is the only thing holding it to the transmission the housing bolts? Aka, the flywheel and clutch assembly come out with the engine. Or am I forgetting something?

Its been 6 years since I had a manual transmission off an engine, and I can't remember if its just the housing bolts and the shaft going into the engine which are the "connecting points".

And I'm taking for granted that you know .. that I know .. that the starter comes off, and the radiator comes out, and anything like wires connected to the engine have to be removed.

But thanks for any other hints I've forgotten.

..

Sloan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
Dont forget to remove the Z-bar.Possibly the clutch linkage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,894 Posts
You might try this,

Whenever I take the motor out I always remove the manual transmission first. I take the transmission loose from the bellhousing leaving the bellhousing attached to the motor. If you don't have a heavy explosion proof bell, the motor will just sit there balanced on the mounts (without the manual tranmission attached)

Then, I pull the motor (with bellhousing attached) out as a unit (minus the transmission). The package is so compact that you really don't have to tilt it to get it out. Just up slightly to clear and remove the motor mounts then, forward to clear the firewall and then straight up and out. Just reverse to install.

Then stab the transmission in the bellhousing after the motor is installed.

Doing it this way allows you to make up the bellhousing and clutch on the shop floor with the motor out. You can even test stab the transmission into the bell and through the clutch disc to assure everything aligns. I find stabbing the transmission from the bottom this way to be very fast and efficient.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top