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guys, I appreciate all your feedback. How do you learn without doing.
You do hours, and hours of homework first. Buy books and videos. Boxwrench makes a fantastic engine building video that covers everything in great detail, and covered the things missed. You ask questions on the forum, but sometimes you need to know the information first in order to realize what questions you need to ask. You don't know what you don't know.

Seriously, buy the Boxwrench video.

I wasn't born knowing how to any of the things I do now. That's why I have an entire library of how-to books I've acquired over the years.
 

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guys, I appreciate all your feedback. How do you learn without doing. That is what I am doing. It's tough when you don't have a guru nearby to call on. I got pretty far with this forum. I made one mistake, critical at that. Now I am back to square one.
I will bring the block back to the machine shop and see what he has to say. That is my next step. Unfortunately we are all locked down in my area, so I can't go anywhere.
Once I find out the damage I can go from there.
As I have mentioned before, this is my first rehab project and I am learning. That means mistakes will be made. It does suck to have to start over with the build, but I am confident I will get it back together.
Nothing wrong with learning and doing it yourself!!!!! We all had to start learning somewhere. Props to you for taking it on in the first place. Mistakes are how I have learned all my life......and I've made a lot of mistakes!
 

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You're already learning .... bet it's the last time you forget the oil pump driveshaft.
I'd be too embarrassed to list all my learning experiences. But as the saying goes, "It's better to learn from the mistakes of others ... you can't live long enough to make them all yourself."
 

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It happens, even the best mechanics can make mistakes, it's just time and money. This is probably one that you will never make again. ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS prime the engine with a drill before dropping the distributor in, ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS have a reliable oil pressure gauge installed, even temporarily before you fire the engine.
 

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This is probably the biggest glass house there is, few people can throw stones. Sooo, your looking for scoring on the bearing surfaces, they are soft and any damage will show up there first - rods usually go first but I would check a main or two to be sure. Its likely you are headed to a 50 over block to do it right, 60 over if the scoring is bad, new pistons and rings. I do not know if 6 cylinders can be bored that far - for others to advise you.

You can talk to your machinist about Knurling the piston and kissing the last cylinder to clean it up. Not the worst solution and could save you a bore and new pistons, but a purist will barf.

If you have to strip down the block, its not a bad idea to reassemably lube everything.

Few things,
a) get a ford shop manual for this car and follow the assembly by the book!
b) noises inside motors NEVER go away, they just get more expensive the longer you run them
c) If your bearings are still good, inspect the cam next, I know its hard, but pull it if you have to and make sure nothing is scored. If it looks good and the surfaces of the followers are good, write a great review for your assembly lube and let us know what you used! Once the cam has scoring it will self destruct quickly and run metal all through your motor.

Final quesiton, what did the oil look like, did you find any metal or metallic looking oil in the bottom of the pan?
 

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So is the number six cylinder the only one that has any scoring? Was the cylinder honed by the shop or you before putting the pistons in? I was expecting to see some indication that the cylinder was honed given that it's a fresh build. When I had my block bored, I didn't ask the shop to but they did a good cross hatch honing of the cylinders too. The owner said honing was including in the boring. I never had a block re-sleeved and don't know if you can re-sleeve just one cylinder but it would suck to have to re-bore the entire block and buy new pistons because of one cylinder. Someone may chime in about re-sleeving. When you finally get around to putting it back together again you may be money ahead paying someone with experience supervise you each step of the way. That's how I learned. If you have a high school or community college near you that does auto shop you may want to make contact with the instructor and make a deal with him/her.
 

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So is the number six cylinder the only one that has any scoring? Was the cylinder honed by the shop or you before putting the pistons in? I was expecting to see some indication that the cylinder was honed given that it's a fresh build. When I had my block bored, I didn't ask the shop to but they did a good cross hatch honing of the cylinders too. The owner said honing was including in the boring. I never had a block re-sleeved and don't know if you can re-sleeve just one cylinder but it would suck to have to re-bore the entire block and buy new pistons because of one cylinder. Someone may chime in about re-sleeving. When you finally get around to putting it back together again you may be money ahead paying someone with experience supervise you each step of the way. That's how I learned. If you have a high school or community college near you that does auto shop you may want to make contact with the instructor and make a deal with him/her.
You can totally resleeve just one cylinder - my 289 has an old sleeve in the #3 cylinder from who-knows-when. So at least there's that!

But to the OP - as others have noted, your experience level is zero. That's fine, but that means that you need to ask for EVERY. SINGLE. STEP. in a process, especially when building a motor. Just slapping stuff together only gets you so far. If you're not 100000% sure about something, you need to ask someone who is likely to be very 100000% sure what the procedure is.

That can be tough, as sometimes people online are not the most descriptive or thorough. Sometimes I feel like I am pulling teeth trying to get a 100% clear response out of a mass of internet people. But when the alternative is costing myself hundreds to thousands of dollars, I do it. Engines are annoying because there's so many little bits to keep straight in your head. It's things like: Do I lubricate this bearing? Do I lubricate only one side, or both sides, or dunk the whole thing in a vat of lube? What kind of lube do I use? How much? What is the installation order? What is the order I should torque bolts in? Is there any big no-no I should know about that will hurt this part? Figure out the answer to all of those questions, and congratulations, you can install... ONE bearing confidently. It just takes a lot of time and a lot of clarification.

Videos are very helpful though I'm not familiar with any that cover a 6 cylinder. There's many that cover a step-by-step process of building a 289. The general steps should be more or less the same, it just helps to have someone who's working on your engine specifically that you can see, so you can see where things are and what looks right / wrong. At this point you're unlikely to know what counts as a lot of metal in the oil, or what an okay/wiped bearing looks like. Posting photos and asking questions will go a long way towards diagnosing what all you need to fix.

If you don't catch everything that needs to be fixed, all in the first try, you will very likely destroy the motor the second time you build it as well.
 
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You can totally resleeve just one cylinder - my 289 has an old sleeve in the #3 cylinder from who-knows-when. So at least there's that!
Thanks Kelly, That should be some relief to the OP jaredlgoldman. at least he won't have to go through the expense of having to buy all new pistons. I'm assuming he can have that one cylinder re-sleeved and bored to the .040 over the rest of the cylinders already are.

There is a bit in Mustang monthly on how to rebuild a I6 200. http://www.mustangandfords.com/how-to/engine/mump-0909-how-to-rebuild-a-200ci-six-part-1/

It also answers a question I had in the back of my mind. When I had my 289 5 bolt block bored the .040 over the #2 cylinder had a hot spot on the cylinder wall about an inch in diameter that was still there after boring. The shop owner pointed it out to me when I picked up the block and didn't know how or if it would have any affect. I went ahead and reassembled the engine. That was in 2009 and it is still running strong 11 years later. The compression in each cylinder when I checked it a couple of years ago was still the same as it was after the engine was broken in...170 in each cylinder. I found another complete 5 bolt rebuilt 289 motor for $300 so I bought that for insurance in case my motor failed. Still have it.
 

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guys, I appreciate all your feedback. How do you learn without doing.
You just did, you'll never forget to put the oil pump shaft in again. I double gasketed an oil filter - once.

FWIW, many of us started off with nothing more than a toolbox full of hand-me-down tools and a Haynes or Chiltons manual. I learned by the seat of my pants and the necessity to do my own work. As @Lizer noted, none of us were born with this knowledge. I have the scars on my hands to show how I earned it. You have a wealth of information available to you that we never had starting off. If you haven't yet, get the reprint of the factory shop manual as it has step-by-step processes for most all repairs. You have the forum and the internet and judging by your pics, a nice garage to work in. You've made your big mistake, now you can just push ahead, get the damage fixed and enjoy your car.
 
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The best (and sometimes expensive) way is to learn from mistakes. You'll look back will be proud that you fixed everything. When I had my engine rebuilt, the builder told me its OK to lose oil pressure, but do not let it run out of water. Meaning it's easier to fix an oil lose problem. Hang in there.
 

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I double gasketed an oil filter - once.
I did too. Not intentionally. The gasket from the old filter stuck to the mating surface when I removed the filter, I failed to wipe off that mating surface as I always have done in the past and put the new filter on. When I started the engine a stream of oil shot out between the two gaskets and missed my wife's head by inches. I learned from that, never to assume that the old gasket came off with the filter and always wipe down the mating surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Thank you everyone for the great feedback and encouragement. I have been watching videos and actually found a old video of a guy putting together my exact engine. That was a big help. I have the shop manual, parts catalogs and any other info I can get my hands on. Not knowing about something is the biggest way to make a mistake. I thought I had all my bases covered.

Next step, I will talk to the machine shop on monday and see what they think. I will probably bring in the head to have it looked at. I am hoping there isn't too much damage. I expect one cycling, the #6 will have to have some work done. We will see. I will keep you all posted. Thanks for being a great resource.

Here is a pic, someone asked. It's nothing fancy. I bought the car 3 years ago for myself and 12 year (now 15) son to work on. It's been great. I have upgraded to power disc brakes, fixed the front suspension, re-built the engine now, welded new floor pans, new carpet and interior including dash, headliner and radio. Last thing after the engine is good is the paint job. We will see about that

752144
 

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Thank you everyone for the great feedback and encouragement. I have been watching videos and actually found a old video of a guy putting together my exact engine. That was a big help. I have the shop manual, parts catalogs and any other info I can get my hands on. Not knowing about something is the biggest way to make a mistake. I thought I had all my bases covered.

Next step, I will talk to the machine shop on monday and see what they think. I will probably bring in the head to have it looked at. I am hoping there isn't too much damage. I expect one cycling, the #6 will have to have some work done. We will see. I will keep you all posted. Thanks for being a great resource.

Here is a pic, someone asked. It's nothing fancy. I bought the car 3 years ago for myself and 12 year (now 15) son to work on. It's been great. I have upgraded to power disc brakes, fixed the front suspension, re-built the engine now, welded new floor pans, new carpet and interior including dash, headliner and radio. Last thing after the engine is good is the paint job. We will see about that

View attachment 752144
They're fun cars to drive. Auto or manual? My dad had a blue 67 I6 200 Coupe. Never knew what he did with it. I had a 67 289 C4 Vert that turned into a I6 200 3 speed in the late 70s after the engine got tired and I happen to get a I6 and 3 spd with all the linkage for free. I kept the 289 radiator and drove it all over the place. Northern Virginia to Key West and back the year Elvis died. No problem whatsoever. Now I have a 64.5 D Code 5 Speed Coupe and my wife has a 65 I6 200 C4 Vert.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Hey guys, remember me. Well I finally got to the bottom of my mustang rebuild problem. I ended up pulling the entire motor and rebuild again from the start. When I installed the new oil pump, I never installed the drive shaft. It's a $8 part that cost me time and money. Rookie mistake, I just didn't notice the part was missing. I had to have the block honed and the pistons cleaned up. It was a couple months of figuring out and waiting for the machine shop.
I am back in business now. The engine is all put back together, oil pump in and drive shaft is installed. I now am ready to attempt a start. I have many check offs to do before that, priming the pump, anti-freeze, pressure gauge, etc.
Any advise before I do this ?
 

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Remove the distributor and run the oil pump with a drill using the appropriate size (1/4" or 5/16") 6 point, deep socket. Turn the crank while running the oil pump to be sure that oil goes everywhere it should. You'll need to find #1 piston at TDC on compression stroke again to stab the dizzy.
Don't put ant-freeze in until you've run the engine on water and confirmed there are no leaks. If you don't mind paying for anti-freeze you can disregard.
If you installed a new cam and lifters be sure to comply with the cam manufacturer's break-in instructions which normally call for running the engine at 2000 rpm for several minutes to insure that there is plenty of oil splashing on the lobes.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #77
Yes, new cam and lifters.
1. How do you run at 2000 rpm ?
2. Clockwise or counterclockwise on the oil pump. I have been told both ?
3. I found TDC, how do I know if that's on the compression stroke ?
 

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Run the drill in reverse when priming the pump, if you are using a regular drill it will get hot quick. I bought a long extension at Harbor Freight with the button you have to push to release the socket, cut the other end off and chuck it up in my drill. You don't want that socket coming off and ending up in your oil pan!

To find the compression stroke, pull the #1 plug and put your thumb over the hole, spin the engine with a ratchet and socket on the balancer bolt, when you feel pressure pushing your thumb away, check to see where your timing marks are, they should be coming up to TDC, turn it to TDC and you are done. Best to turn the engine at least one complete revolution so you can feel the difference.
 

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Run the drill in reverse when priming the pump, if you are using a regular drill it will get hot quick. I bought a long extension at Harbor Freight with the button you have to push to release the socket, cut the other end off and chuck it up in my drill. You don't want that socket coming off and ending up in your oil pan!

To find the compression stroke, pull the #1 plug and put your thumb over the hole, spin the engine with a ratchet and socket on the balancer bolt, when you feel pressure pushing your thumb away, check to see where your timing marks are, they should be coming up to TDC, turn it to TDC and you are done. Best to turn the engine at least one complete revolution so you can feel the difference.
The ford inline 6 distributor runs clockwise!
761626
 

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Yes, new cam and lifters.
1. How do you run at 2000 rpm ?
2. Clockwise or counterclockwise on the oil pump. I have been told both ?
3. I found TDC, how do I know if that's on the compression stroke ?
1. Turn the idle screw in until the carb maintains 2000 engine rpm. Verify your cam manufacturer's recommendation, don't take my word for it. Allowing an engine with a new cam to idle at 700 rpm will kill that cam in a hurry.
2. Clockwise for the 6 cylinder.
3. Thumb in the spark plug hole.
 
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