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Discussion Starter #1
I replaced my 289 engine 5,000 miles ago. I had a well known machine shop do a complete rebuild.

It has consistently used oil from the 1st mile. In fact, it used 2 qts in the last 1600 miles. The engine shop did a leak down and compression test. The leak down ranged between 2-5%. The compression was consistently between 150 - 155.

They are saying there is no indication that anything is wrong. I am saying using oil at a rate of 4qts every 3000 miles is a wrong.

They say they will do a valve job and re-ring the engine. Any suggestions on additional troubleshooting or recommendations on what the shop should redo.

The engine 302 Block .30 Over
Compression 10.7
SRP Forged Pistons
Total Seal Rings - Gapless Moly Top Ring/Gapless 2nd Ring/3 Piece
Melling Cam .05 Duration Int - 224 Exh - 234; Valve Lift Int - .498 Exh - .520
Power Heads Factory 289 Intake - .500" 215.1 Exhaust - .500" 173.8
1.94x1.60 Forged Stainless Steel Valves
Crane Roller Rockers
Intake Edelbrock Performer Port Matched
Carburetor Edelbrock 1406 600 CFM
Ignition Stock

Thanks in advance!
 

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Do you have baffles in your valve covers. I know of at leasrt two rebuilds where oil consumption was a problem because of no baffles. egr sucked oil right into engine Gary
 

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Do you mean that the PCV valve sucked oil right into the engine? The ERG is connected to the exhaust, and wasn't installed on engines until 1974
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure...I know there is a baffle on the valve cover where I poor in the oil. I will look at the PVC hole.
 

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GET RID OF THE MOLLEY RINGS.... I have heard of people never getting them to seal... but your compression doesnt sound bad. I would try some std cast iron rings....
 

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I have chrome moly rings and it took about 2K miles to seat, no more oil consumption. Have seen assorted issues including oil consumtion with total seal rings.
 

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How good are your valve seals?

My machinist had me replace the 6 year old rubber Edelbrock seals with TEFLON seals to dry it up. If you do this, and it may be a good idea in any case, get a good spring compressor, you'll thank yourself later.
 

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I replaced the motor in my 66 about 3500 miles ago. The 1st 2200 miles, I used close to 15 qts of oil.
Problem 1 was no baffles in the valve covers; oil was sucked right through the pcv valve.
Problem 2 was that i started using synthetic too soon and the rings never seated.
I fixed the valve covers and went back to standard grade oil. The last 1300 miles I've used less than 1/4 qt.
 

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I see a couple things that don't add up. First, with properly installed TotalSeal rings, I would think anything over 2% leakdown is unacceptable. Second, with true 10.7:1 compression, I would expect better cranking compression, somewhere up around 180-190psi, unless the cam is bleeding off alot of pressure. I also agree that the moly rings are a PITA to seat properly, especially if the finish hone wasn't done to match the ring material. I would expect that an observer would be able to see a slight haze in the exhaust upon moderate to hard accelleration. Before you resort to a re-ring, you could try the "Bon-Ami" approach:

One excerpt:

My Father-in-law, Joe Turlay, who passed away in '85 was an engineer of some
note at Buick, before and after WWII. He told me a story about the Buick
Straight-8 engine that he helped design. This was a robust engine that was
noted for excellent service for the lifetime of a car then being pulled and
put into marine use for many years. I removed a crankshaft from one in the
'60s that must have weighed over 100#. The story he told involved a batch
of extra hard blocks that made it through the manufacturing process and into
the field without notice, some time in the late 40's or early 50's. The
owners were complaining about higher than normal oil consumption when it was
realized that the extra hard blocks were not allowing the rings to seat
properly. He claimed that they 'stumbled' onto the Bon Ami trick using a
teaspoon to 'flick' it into the carb while the engine was running. This
solved the problem and was written up as a formal field service note for the
dealerships. According to Joe, the main ingredient in Bon Ami that did the
trick was the dust from the manufacturing processes for making grinding
wheels.

And another:

The Universal Cleanser
This one was told to me by the proprietor of a Mackay automotive engineering works, a man well respected in the trade. In the late 1960's he was an apprentice motor mechanic with the local distributors of British and European cars. The first of the six cylinder 109 Land Rovers in the district had been sold by them. The new owners soon brought them back, complaining bitterly about blue smoke and horrendous oil consumption. Cylinder heads were lifted on a couple of them revealing glazed bores and the only remedy the firm could think of was a light de-glazing hone and new rings.
The more of these sixes they sold, the more it began to look like an epidemic. Rover Australia were contacted and it seems that it was an Australia wide epidemic of near-new, smoky, oil guzzling 2.6 litre Land Rovers.
Eventually the solution came in the form of a technical bulletin from Rover HQ. There was something wrong with the bore finish on these engines and if they were treated gently, as owners of new cars tend to do, the rings would never bed in and the bores would glaze. Owners should be instructed to give them plenty of welly in the first few hundred miles.
The official fix for those vehicles already affected was as follows:-
Remove the aircleaner. Start engine and set to a fast 1500 rpm idle.Take a tablespoon full of Bon Ami, a popular household cleanser and slowly tap the powder into the carburettor throat over a period of fifteen minutes. Put everything back in place and take the vehicle for a brisk test drive.
The bulletin was most insistent that it should be Bon Ami cleanser. Ajax or Jif would not do.
My informant swears that this story is 100% true and that the fix did, in fact, work exactly as advertised.
 
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