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Discussion Starter #21
Thank you Woodchuck. I agree with you, but I am going to look at the oil pump screen and oil pump driveshaft and clean up the pan. Then go from there. I am trying to avoid a tear down.
 

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Thank you Woodchuck. I agree with you, but I am going to look at the oil pump screen and oil pump driveshaft and clean up the pan. Then go from there. I am trying to avoid a tear down.
Then, at the very least, after you clean up the pan and replace the oil pump PICK-UP, set the pan back in place (no need for a gasket just yet) with a bolt on each corner, get a couple gallons of mineral spirits and a fresh oil filter and, using a gallon at a time, put one gallon in the crankcase and run the oil pump with a drill for 10 minutes or so at a stretch, drain off that batch, refill and run for another 10 minutes, dump THAT batch, then put in a gallon of straight SAE30HD and run THAT for 10 minutes, dump IT and put on your new filter, then button everything up. At least that might push anything else that's remaining the rest of the way through.... I'd also leave the valve covers loose and when you're pumping the oil through at the end make sure each pushrod is flowing oil. If not then you'll be at least pulling that lifter.
 

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I would check the coil. I had a problem with my 53 Hudson where you could drive it a couple miles down the road and it would get hot and the car would die. If you waited 10 minutes, it would start back up again.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Woodchuck, that is a good idea! Your post #22 is appreciated. I will have to look up the procedure for running the oil pump with an electric drill. I was hoping not to have to pull the distributor as it is timed quite nicely at 8 degrees BTC with vacuum on.

I have installed a new Blue Streak coil (see post #15). And I have made a fixture to raise the coil up and forward so it will be somewhat air-cooled. :) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Getting back again on this thread. Preparing to drop the pan for a good clean up and check the oil pump pickup screen. I was able to drop the crossmember and remove the starter. However, I ran into a problem trying to remove the idler arm bolts connected to passenger framerail. The idler arm needs to drop a bit for pan clearance, as specified in the 1968 shop manual.

There are two bolts. Access would be good except, I can not get a 9/16 inch socket on the lower nut due to interference with the castle nut and threads connecting the steering link that rotates. A open end wrench will not work either. I do not think there is clearance for a box wrench. I did not want to disassemble the steering bushing on the idler arm. Removal of the castle nut would not provide any needed clearance as the threads are sticking up and thereby providing interference.

Does anyone have an idea on how to remove this nut? Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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A open end wrench will not work either.
I have never had a problem removing the idler arm bracket bolts with a 9/16" socket on the outside of the frame rail and a 9/16" wrench on the nuts. Would turning the steering wheel and moving the idler arm help?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Thanks for the thoughts.

I tried turning the wheels with no luck, because the idler arm cone with the bushing pivots vertically, so no matter which way the wheels are turned the location of the castle nut in relation to the idler arm bolt actually does not change.

Woodchuck, the visuals are appreciated. But, the open end wrench would not provide enough leverage IMHO. These nuts are really really torqued down. The crows foot wrench may be able to be installed on the nut, but my guess, once some torque was applied the wrench would slip off and gum up the nut. Never the less, I will give it a try.

I am going to try removing the bolt with a wrench from outside the frame rail with a breaker bar, but if I break it loose the bolt is just going to spin. So, I am going to figure out how to install a wrench inside the frame rail and anchor it from spinning.

I am working on my back on the ground with the front end lifted, and I am old and weak with no power tools, just hand tools. So, I need to come up with neat way to get this nut off.

Any further ideas would be appreciated.
 

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I am old and decrepit also and just last week I removed the idler arm bracket from my '65 using a socket and ratchet on the heads of the bolts and a 9/16" wrench on the nuts. Can you post a photo of the nuts on yours? I just can't imagine how the nuts would be "hidden" to the point that you can't even get a wrench on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
OK, I will try to get a photo in the next few days. However, I might be mistaken about this, but a 1965 idler arm is different than a 1968 idler arm in terms of bolt hole placement. I looked at replacement of the idler arm on the web and the respective idler arms look different in terms of hole placement. The 1965 arm looks to have good bolt clearance, while the 1968 lower bolt hole in too near the idler arm cone and bushing. A Ford design flaw?
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Here are three photos of my idler arm. The lower bolt nut access is blocked by the cotter pin on the bushing castle nut which I could not see while laying on the ground. However, just looking at the photo I am a bit skeptical that I will be able to get a socket on the nut with the cotter pin moved away. The cone threads could still be blocking access to the nut. We shall see.
68Idler Arm 008.jpg
68Idler Arm 009.jpg
68Idler Arm 011.jpg
68Idler Arm 011.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Well, I sent four photos by mistake; the last two are duplicates. Sorry about that. Any more thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Which nut are you trying to remove- the nut on the idler arm mounting bracket or the nut with the cotter pin?
I can see lots of access to the bracket nut with an open end wrench. And you'll need to remove that nut and bolt to get access to the nut with the cotter pin.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
The plan is to drop the oil pan for cleanup, and that calls for dropping the idler arm per 1968 Mustang shop manual. So, I need to remove the idler arm bracket lower nut (as well as the upper) and lower the steering just enough to remove the pan. I have tried an open end wrench, but it will not slide on far enough, and it will probably slip. As I said above, these idler arm nuts are really tight. So I need to get a socket on the nut. (I am not trying to do anything with the castle nut.) I am going to move the cotter pin out of the way, and see if I can get a socket on the nut. We shall see. Thanks for the input.
 

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Is this a Power steering car? Having dropped my pan a couple of months ago to install and ARP oil pump driveshaft, I didn't remove any of that stuff. Not even the starter. I just removed the brace, and the sway bar mounts but not the end links to lower it down enough to lower the pan forward and then back.
 
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Discussion Starter #36
Yes, this is a power steering car. The 1968 shop manual says the crossbar and starter need to be removed while the idler arm with all connected steering components connected needs to be lowered. This is a bone stock 1968 V8 289 coupe built in fall of 1967. The pan bolts next to the starter were not accessible (original starter).
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Upon closer inspection with a mirror, I determined that even with castle nut cotter pin moved away, a 9/16 socket would not go on to idler arm nut. (see above prior posts on this thread). So, I was able to get an open end wrench on the bottom nut inside, and loosen the bolt with a breaker bar from outside the frame rail. The bolt did spin, but the open end wrench inside stopped against the top idler arm bolt, and the bottom bolt was eventually backed out. Then the top bolt was removed. So, now there should be full access to the pan bolts. But, is the automatic transmission coolant lines going to be a problem? They are tight against the pan on the passenger side. Now for pan removal.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I was able to remove oil pan today. I found the following: 1. The oil pump pickup screen is plugged 75% with debris. 2. The deep part of pan has at least 1/4 inch of sludge, and most appears to have been there a while as it is fairly firm. 3. Embedded in the sludge I found three metal pieces shown in the photos below. The metal is non-magnetic, flexible, and shiny gray when scratched to bare metal, probably lead (maybe copper). The metal has the following dimensions; width = 21/32", thickness = 1/64 ", pieced together the diameter would be 1 3/4" plus or minus. There are no signs of recent circular scouring. I think the metal pieces have been in the pan a long time. The engine has been running without any knocks at all.

So, does anyone have any idea what the metal pieces are and where they came from?? The pan has never been off this engine as I am basically the original owner. My wife bought the car with 1500 miles on it in 1968 and drove it a lot, but it has been parked 30 plus years.
 

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Those sure look like bearing shells to me. I can even see the tang that fits in a notch in the rod on one of them. Maybe the original owner had an engine failure in less than 1500 miles and the dealer put in a long block and just stuck the original pan in place without even cleaning it.
 

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Here are three photos of my idler arm. The lower bolt nut access is blocked by the cotter pin on the bushing castle nut which I could not see while laying on the ground. However, just looking at the photo I am a bit skeptical that I will be able to get a socket on the nut with the cotter pin moved away. The cone threads could still be blocking access to the nut. We shall see. View attachment 752822
Looks like the "generic replacement" type idler arm of "less expensive" construction commonly used. The "better" ones have a one-piece bracket/shaft and look like this....

 
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