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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had an epiphiny regarding making a simple adjustable strut rod.
I had made a pair a while ago with a hiem joint and a fabricated connector for the hiem to the frame. I felt the benefit of the hiem joint immediately in smoother action, But I also felt a harsher ride from the unforgiving nature of the connection to the frame. I have 215/45 17 tires so the impact with road surfaces was jarring.

I removed them, reinstalled the originals and didn't give it much thought until recently. I have been spending an excessive amount of time and money at the alignment shop recently. I'm sure as many of you have also discovered the average alignment shop just can't seem to get it on our cars. The shop I had used for so many years, the guy who owns the shop who did all my alignments and did them right, made a staff change and is training one of his employees to perform alignments, and he just doesn't get it. I could go on and bore you to tears about the other shops, but that's not the purpose of the post.

To make a stock rod, adjustable is really a simple process. It only requires a hack saw and a right and left hand 3/4" die for tools. A 10" x 3/4" swedged tube and 2 3/4" jam nuts for each rod.
Here's the simplistic directions. Cut the strut rod 2 times to remove a section from the middle. Taper the very end of each end on a grinder enough to facilitate easy starting of the die. Cut threads on the end of each piece. Screw on the jam nuts and the swedged tube. And, voila adjustable strut rods with factory correct rubber bushing mounting.
I haven't done this yet, But I wanted to share this idea, to get some feed back, see if anyone else has done this.
It would make setting caster simple and leave the camber setting a stand alone adjustment, unlike it currently being tied to caster with more shims behind one upper control arm bolt.
 

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Isn't that the exact same as just twisting nut the nut on more or less? It's even the same angle.

I mean, they ARE adjustable..
 

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Just some guy
67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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That's what I thought, at least on the '67's and newer. A large part of the strut rod upgrade deal is to eliminate the "binding" action of the front rubber bushing by replacing it with a heim joint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No, I dont think that that is an adjustment area. I believe (correct me if I'm wrong) that the nut up front needs to be tight to secure the proper torque on the rubber bushings. But I don't know about 67 and newer.
 

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GypsyR said:
That's what I thought, at least on the '67's and newer. A large part of the strut rod upgrade deal is to eliminate the "binding" action of the front rubber bushing by replacing it with a heim joint.
That, and eliminating the brakes (or potholes) from being able to feed back alignment changes into the spindle. That rod is the only thing locating the lower control arm, and rubber compresses. Poly bushings would do the same thing, but the binding frequently leads to strut rod breaking .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree that the adjustable rods on the aftermarket are designed for less binding. The adjustablilty is an added benefit due to the method of construction.
But if like me, you could not tolerate the jarring harshness (my car is a daily driver) then the method I described would offer you a method to precisely dial in the caster.
 

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All '67/later came with adjustable strut rods ... it's how you set caster on them. Only the '65/'66 have non-adjustable, as both caster and camber are set with the shims.

I agree that a huge part of the upgrade is to get rid of the rubber strut rod bushings. Without eliminating them, it's not that great of an improvement. I absolutely love the StreetOrTrack strut rods in my '66!
 

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Ohh. I didn't know that pre-67's weren't adjustable.. I'm looking at my 67's going "They seem to be adjustable already?" :lol:
 

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That would work fine if all you want is the adjustable feature. I'm still intrigued by your experiences though, I just haven't experienced the harness you describe. Are you running the roller spring perches as well? I guess the tire height might be a contributing factor, but is so then you should get more harness with any rod. I'm stumped.

One suggestion that I've read on some other boards is that if you really want to keep the rubber put a poly bushing on the back side of the bracket and a plain rubber one on the front. That way when you hit the brakes you don't get much deflection, but hitting a pot hole still allows some give, and the pivot still occurs (although there would still be more stress on the rod than with two rubber bushings).

Any way I hope you find something that works for you - as you are the only person who has to like what you end up with. :)

John Harvey
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have rebuilt the entire front end this year with CF tubular arms, moog tie rods, Replaced the bearings in the spring perches, replaced the shocks, Alignments up the wazoo. I've been trying to locate some noises that eminate from the front and have been advised by a fellow VMF member to try a few things. Which I will try to do next week end, as they require about a day to accomplish. Requires removing some parts and test driving then reinstalling them.
My experience with adjustable rods may be related to my short sidewall tires. or this other problem.
Either way I hope to have a solution to that noise real soon. Then maybe I'll put the hiem joints on the rods, since I still have a pair of frame brackets I had fabricated.
Making adjustable rods is not that difficult. It's the Hiem connector bracket to the frame that requires some skill.
What size tires, sidewall height are you running?
 

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I have 205/60x16 on 16x7 rims. My suggestion above was backwards, it would be the poly in front and the rubber in back of the bracket.

Good luck with the noise hunt!

John Harvey
 
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