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Saw this a couple of days ago. Couldn't believe the price of $175 for an original HIPO carb. Apparently the seller did not know what he had in the way of current market value. This was on Facebook Market Place. He even asked for an offer. Apparently it sold within minutes. Don't know what the buyer paid but I'd assume the asking price. Brings up the following questions:

1. Is it only the seller's responsibility to price an item without research?

2. Is there no buyer's responsibility for realizing the seller under priced the item by probably 1/10th of its value and thus to take advantage of the seller's lack of knowledge? What if the seller was a surviving spouse selling an item or car?

3. Would the higher road be to offer 50% of its value and still allow the buyer to flip it and make a very nice profit?

4. Am I so out of touch with today's world that greed and profit trumps all?

748820
 

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Saw this a couple of days ago. Couldn't believe the price of $175 for an original HIPO carb. Apparently the seller did not know what he had in the way of current market value. This was on Facebook Market Place. He even asked for an offer. Apparently it sold within minutes. Don't know what the buyer paid but I'd assume the asking price. Brings up the following questions:

1. Is it only the seller's responsibility to price an item without research?

2. Is there no buyer's responsibility for realizing the seller under priced the item by probably 1/10th of its value and thus to take advantage of the seller's lack of knowledge? What if the seller was a surviving spouse selling an item or car?

3. Would the higher road be to offer 50% of its value and still allow the buyer to flip it and make a very nice profit?

4. Am I so out of touch with today's world that greed and profit trumps all?

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The seller obviously did some research and knew the carb's exact details since he advertised it as a "289 271 HP". I would also assume he researched the value. Maybe only the tag is HiPo and the carb doesn't match the tag? Maybe the carb has serious problems and can't be repaired? We don't know the whole story.
 

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Best thing to do would be to purchase it at the asking price, look it over & then if you feel the need give the Seller more $$.
If you tell the Seller it is worth more & then try to buy it for a little more odds are the Seller will want top $$ and you will end
up not being the Buyer. That being said the answer to question (4) over the past few years appears to be yes.
 

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What makes you think the seller didn't know exactly what he had? He advertised it as if he did. Maybe he's flipping it for twice the money he paid for it? I see nothing immoral about paying the asking price for an item. Maybe greed and profits allowed the seller to amass a collection that he feels the moral imperative to pass along to others. If not for greed and profits we wouldn't be able to enjoy these cars and have the ability to rebuild them as we do.
 

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Agree with awhtx.

That said, for me there would be a balance. When I know I am getting a good deal I don't try to negotiate. If it were a ridiculous deal and an unknowing seller I would say I would take it, pay them what they want and then give them more $ and educate them a bit. That way it is a win-win.

I have a wealthy friend that will give me some significantly valued bicycle parts from time to time. I will then donate to a charity for which he has a passion.
 

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I'm not all that sure it's a K code carb. The choke cable bracket is certainly bogus. I'd have to see a few more photos.

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That's peanuts, how do you think the owner of the world's oldest hockey stick felt after he sold his hockey stick for $1000 and the guy who bought it flipped it for $300K. The barber who was given the stick is a very close friend to my step-dad. The barber had no clue of the value or significance of the stick but the buyer was a hockey historian. The stick used to hang on the barber shop wall along with many other antique items that were given to the barber over the years by customers. He treated them more as decorations that gave his shop the old time feel. When word got back on the significance and real value of the stick the barber felt duped and hired a lawyer. Long story short, the judge ruled in favor of the buyer. Here is the story Museum pays $300,000 to N.S. man for world's oldest hockey stick
 

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Due diligence on all parties,......
 

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I see nothing wrong with buying an item at its asking price. Now, if the buyer made misrepresentations to get the price down from the list price that's a different story. Personally, if I inspected the item and determined it was the real-deal I would probably pay extra, but that's me.
As for the hockey stick story, I can't believe that someone who had antique items didn't take a little time to assess their value.
 

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I see nothing wrong with buying an item at its asking price. Now, if the buyer made misrepresentations to get the price down from the list price that's a different story. Personally, if I inspected the item and determined it was the real-deal I would probably pay extra, but that's me.
As for the hockey stick story, I can't believe that someone who had antique items didn't take a little time to assess their value.
The bigger question is, who pays 300k for a stick?
 

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If you paid the price he was asking, then no issues. Something is only worth what someone else is willing to pay for it. If I have something that's supposedly worth a million bucks, but only ask 100, cuz I don't know any better, that's my fault. Buyer beware is a common saying; where's the one for the seller to know what they have before selling it dirt cheap?
 

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In this same vein I wish the folks who have in the past sold me completely misdescribed cars that turned out to need thousands and thousands in work to cure issues that were obviously and hidden from view would offer to give me money back for duping me.

Items have a price, you pay it and you own it, good or bad. Some you win, some you lose
 

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First there’s nothing wrong with paying what the buyer asks even if it’s a low ball. Second maybe like many of us here he has built his car and wants to give the part to someone that he knows will get good use out of it and Help that person out cause building one of our cars can be expensive!
 

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When I see any item for sale, I assume the owner knows his/her property and its value. The listed price is probably a bit high and the owner would be happy (if not overjoyed) to receive it. If I think the price is too high, or too low, my first thought is that I don’t know everything about the item. If I buy it thinking that it’s really something else, or really worth a lot more than the asking price, it is just as likely that I’m wrong as it is that the seller is wrong. There have more times that I’ve been wrong then I’ve been right.

What about the person who sold an old picture frame with worthless painting for the buyer to discover an original signed Declaration of Independence behind the painting? Should the buyer split any gain with the seller. I think not. Maybe the buyer also got “lucky” with the hockey stick with it being much older than either thought. And maybe the seller of the carburetor thinks he/she has a HIPO example when they do not or aren’t sure.
 
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