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Discussion Starter #1
For those that have done this swap do you have any advice or wish you had dones or wish hadn't done things? Basically I have a 1967 mustang and I just picked up a 1996 explorer 3.73 locker. I have 0 offset wheels on my car now but I'm nervous to angle my driveshaft which then I keep my wheels. So any of you have your driveshaft angled and any side effects?
 

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You can use the Explorer rear end as-is (width wise) in your '67 (you will have to relocate the spring perches). Since the pinion on the rear end is offset to the passenger side your driveshaft will operate at an angle and some owners have reported that they had to modify the right rear passenger footwell with a BFH to prevent the driveshaft from hitting the footwell.
You can narrow the rear end by cutting 2-7/8" out of the driver side axle tube and using another passenger side axle on the driver side. This centers the pinion and eliminates the horizontal angle of the driveshaft. You may need spacers or adapters to move the wheels and tires outboard.
 

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I cut my explorer rear down and went with two short side axles to get it (almost) centered in back, but I know someone who kept his intact and he says the pumpkin bottoms out and slams up underneath at times. His rear end is lowered a little from stock height though. I suppose you could go with very shallow spring perches and stock height leaf springs to reduce the possibility of that happening. He's never mentioned any issues due to the drive shaft being angled to the side somewhat though. It's just the occasional bang/thump from hitting dips in the road or with passengers that aggravates him.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I cut my explorer rear down and went with two short side axles to get it (almost) centered in back, but I know someone who kept his intact and he says the pumpkin bottoms out and slams up underneath at times. His rear end is lowered a little from stock height though. I suppose you could go with very shallow spring perches and stock height leaf springs to reduce the possibility of that happening. He's never mentioned any issues due to the drive shaft being angled to the side somewhat though. It's just the occasional bang/thump from hitting dips in the road or with passengers that aggravates him.
Thank you so much for the info. I've decided to cut mine down and center it. Thanks again for the great info
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You can use the Explorer rear end as-is (width wise) in your '67 (you will have to relocate the spring perches). Since the pinion on the rear end is offset to the passenger side your driveshaft will operate at an angle and some owners have reported that they had to modify the right rear passenger footwell with a BFH to prevent the driveshaft from hitting the footwell.
You can narrow the rear end by cutting 2-7/8" out of the driver side axle tube and using another passenger side axle on the driver side. This centers the pinion and eliminates the horizontal angle of the driveshaft. You may need spacers or adapters to move the wheels and tires outboard.

Thank you very much. I'll be cutting mine down. That's the way I was leaning anyway. I really appreciate the feedback
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In that case, the width of your rear will be just slightly shorter than stock was when you add a 1" adapter on each end. I chose Eibach. Also, it won't be exactly centered, but close enough. (y)
Yes I'll do the spacers for a little while and then maybe upgrade to a nicer wheel that will fit my new offset. Thanks again for the information.
 

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Yes I'll do the spacers for a little while and then maybe upgrade to a nicer wheel that will fit my new offset.
The narrow rear end will allow you to use "old school" "deep-dish" style wheels which have less backspace.
 

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You may find this handy:

 

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Discussion Starter #11
You may find this handy:


This is fantastic. Thanks for the write up.
 

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I’ll add one more tid bit to think about... depending on your HP, the cars intended purpose (cruising, drag strip, track car, hooligan, or some combination there of), you might also consider increasing the preload on the clutch pack. It makes a noticeable difference with two wheeled traction challenged events and may even help keep the clutches alive longer (less slip when you don’t want slip; ie, lots of side to side weight transfer with lots of throttle). I set my 8.8 up with extra preload and it’s been performing great for over 12 years now.

Something to think about...:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I’ll add one more tid bit to think about... depending on your HP, the cars intended purpose (cruising, drag strip, track car, hooligan, or some combination there of), you might also consider increasing the preload on the clutch pack. It makes a noticeable difference with two wheeled traction challenged events and may even help keep the clutches alive longer (less slip when you don’t want slip; ie, lots of side to side weight transfer with lots of throttle). I set my 8.8 up with extra preload and it’s been performing great for over 12 years now.

Something to think about...:)

Thank you very much for the advice. Right now I'm not much over 200 horsepower and the car is just a weekend street driver but I will definitely look into this. Thanks again
 

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Dimples
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I had a ‘75 Maverick master in both of those configurations. Worth noting that by the time I went 4-wheel disc, I had added the Mustang Steve booster conversion that changes the pedal ratio.
 

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Mine is disc-disc appropriate and came as part of a complete power brake kit from Chockostang. I have no idea who makes it offhand. Sorry that's not much help.
 

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I am using a master cylinder for a Ford Ranger, 1986-1990. It is aluminum with a plastic reservoir (very light weight), has standard thread line sizes, and a 15/16" bore. I have disc up front and drum in the rear, no power assist. I've got good pedal feel; firm but not too firm, and doesn't go to the floor under hard braking. I've tried both 7/8" bore (too much pedal travel) and 1" bore (too hard of a pedal) and liked the 15/16" the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I am using a master cylinder for a Ford Ranger, 1986-1990. It is aluminum with a plastic reservoir (very light weight), has standard thread line sizes, and a 15/16" bore. I have disc up front and drum in the rear, no power assist. I've got good pedal feel; firm but not too firm, and doesn't go to the floor under hard braking. I've tried both 7/8" bore (too much pedal travel) and 1" bore (too hard of a pedal) and liked the 15/16" the best.
Thank you very much for that info
 
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