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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just got the July 2019 Hot Rod mag in the mail. Amazingly, there is not a red Camaro on the cover. Even more amazing, it's not even a Chevy on the cover but a Mustang. The cover is a Shelby G.T.350R Continuation Car.

I haven't actually read the article yet but I saw this picture of what looks like extended frame rails. I just found it interesting and thought I'd share.
 

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Yes, it looks like they added another floor support rearward of the factory location. Doubt it provides any benefit other than reinforcing the floor underneath the rear of the seat pan.
 

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1) Those continuation cars are built by folks who know what they are doing. They had thier hands in on the original 36 GT 350 race cars.
2) I've been suggesting for years that Hot Rod Magazine ought to be on your subscription list. Something new to learn every month no matter what make.
 

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67 coupe, 69 Sportsroof, 86 hatchback
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No one thinks it might have something to do with that IRS setup?
Wonder why no subframe connectors though? Seems an odd omission.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
It looks like it adds rigidity by running through to the back of the seat risers instead of just ending at the front. Since the risers tie-in to the rockers its probably a significant improvement.
 

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"Above frame" connectors then? To clear the exhaust? I didn't see any pictures of the rear floorboard area from the top.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"Above frame" connectors then? To clear the exhaust? I didn't see any pictures of the rear floorboard area from the top.

I don't know what's above the floor. I was just trying to describe that it looks, to me, like the extended front frame rails on this car run under the front seat risers. And the front seat risers tie in to the rockers. As opposed to the stock style frame rails ending just before the front seat risers. Seems being tied to the front seat risers would add a lot of rigidity.
 

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Hard to know what effectively helps, without actual knowledge about what parts of the body that moves and in what directions. Without real measuring it's guesswork. A guy on Stangnet tried to do that some years ago in a simple set up and got some interesting results. Like that the frame connectors he welded to his car didn't made any measurable change on the torsional deflection.
 

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I don't know what's above the floor. I was just trying to describe that it looks, to me, like the extended front frame rails on this car run under the front seat risers. And the front seat risers tie in to the rockers. As opposed to the stock style frame rails ending just before the front seat risers. Seems being tied to the front seat risers would add a lot of rigidity.
There don't seem many pictures of this car on the internet. They must be keeping the specs secret or something. There are some pictures here: autoblog.com/2018/05/09/1965-shelby-gt350r-mustang-original-venice-crew-review/. It looks there's a roll cage and a 5 point racing harness inside the car. The bolt visible at the rear of the extended floor support may tie into these added safety features. And it may add just enough extra rigidity while keeping the car light.

 

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It may have the convertible inner rockers added to it which is supposed to make a considerable difference.

I see what looks like a bolt at the very rear of the extended floor support. I wonder if they are using it for some sort of roll bar/cage support mount or... Possibly a mount for a 5 point harness bottom belt? Just throwing out ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hard to know what effectively helps, without actual knowledge about what parts of the body that moves and in what directions. Without real measuring it's guesswork. A guy on Stangnet tried to do that some years ago in a simple set up and got some interesting results. Like that the frame connectors he welded to his car didn't made any measurable change on the torsional deflection.

iirc, They added significant beam stiffness. Which I think makes sense with no tie-in to each other or the rockers.
 

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iirc, They added significant beam stiffness. Which I think makes sense with no tie-in to each other or the rockers.
But have anyone measured? Or is it just based on guesswork, company ads and something said so many times that it have become a truth. Which design are the most bang for the buck from a performance view?

But yes these extended frame rails are interesting, because it's a different solution and it's made by some people that may have some interesting knowledge about these cars. :)
 
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