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Discussion Starter #1
This weld is pretty sloppy, is it factory, or the work of one of the previous owners?


Passenger side frame where it meets the fire wall on my 68 Mustang
 

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I used to think that, but if there was a problem, they didn't take the car back to the weld bays, they pulled it off to the side and fixed it. I found this out years ago, I had to ask some very knowledgeable people about a repair on my 66. I had the carpet out, and there was a weld on either side of the RH rocker seat belt hole. The Ford engineer I used to know wasn't surprised, said the nut either fell off or was cross-threaded on the line, and they chopped it open on the top and either side, bent it down, welded in another nut, bent it back up, and welded it. The results were pretty ugly, but only with the carpet removed.
 

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That appears to be a weld from a wire feed welder. They didn't have MIG welders back then. They used either oxy/acetylene welding or brazing back then to do body work and repairs.
 

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Mig came out in the 40s, mig for steel was in the 50s, not saying they used em the factories but the technology was there
As I understand it, you are correct. Here's what I've read on it,


The first patent related to MIG welding was in the late 1920's. More techniques and patents for MIG weld occured in the 40's, 50's, and 60's. MIG welding as we know it (practical use in automotive areas) didn't occur until about the late 70's. Modern cars (including vintage Mustangs) have been assembled with spot welders due to cost, ease of training the operator, and speed. A MIG welder would require a higher level of skill, more time, and cost to operate versus a spot welder.
 

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mine had a very small amount of weld at that seam on the torque box of my 69. however, it was nothing like that.

that looks like someone forgot to turn the gas on.
 

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As I understand it, you are correct. Here's what I've read on it,


The first patent related to MIG welding was in the late 1920's. More techniques and patents for MIG weld occured in the 40's, 50's, and 60's. MIG welding as we know it (practical use in automotive areas) didn't occur until about the late 70's. Modern cars (including vintage Mustangs) have been assembled with spot welders due to cost, ease of training the operator, and speed. A MIG welder would require a higher level of skill, more time, and cost to operate versus a spot welder.
I'm pretty sure u r spot on!
 

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It is amazing sometimes what you find on these cars. I had what I thought were horrible repair welds at the seam between the roof and the rear quarters on my '71 when I first got it back in 1976. But when I dug into them, they were factory welds. The spot welds were under lead, and they had corroded. That caused the lead to pop out at each spot weld. What a mess. Melted out a lot of lead to repair it.
 

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This weld is pretty sloppy, is it factory, or the work of one of the previous owners?


Passenger side frame where it meets the fire wall on my 68 Mustang
UWO...unidentified welded object. What the heck kind of weld is that? Drunk welder who ran out of gas? No helmet so he closed his eyes?
Looks like he tried to shut the seam? Hard to tell if that's even a seam. You can probably
carefully reshape that seam w/ a cut off wheel and tape/scribe/mark so your line is straight, and then make your factory plug welds by using a spot cutter and weld.
 

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The pillar support for the windshield on my '69 has some really crummy looking welds, and I know for a fact the car had never been touched from the time it left the factory...looks similar to the OP welds....
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Figured it was not factory. All the sheet metal looks original, so perhaps it was a previous owner trying to strengthen the chassis by welding some seems.
 

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Ok here is a picture of mine, definitely factory seam welded, looks to be mig, does not look to be 100% seamed. much better welding than yours, looks to be real thick wire burning hot, so the guy on the line could weld it up FAST.

You have 2 options. Your car was welded by the new guy, or the guy who replaced the welder for the day.
Or someone came in and tried to seam up what was not welded, to make it 100% and just got happy, or he wanted it uniformed crappy..

Did your frame have the black thick undercoat on it? like dried hard tar? When I was wire brushing with the grinder I about got knocked out by it. and did it have the pink primer below that?

I think that coating will determine if it was done at the factory or by the last guy.

By the way It is F'N FREEZING in my garage, you owe me some Hot Chocolate or Coffee.


IMG_1867.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yup, I had huge amount of that tar stuff all over. Looked like it was slopped on pretty bad. My car must have been put together late on someones shift. All the factory red oxide primer under there with some of the original white overspray.
 
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