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Discussion Starter #1
I am just about out of my old petroleum based cleaner and I need to pick up some new stuff. Any favorites out there? Thoughts on the water based stuff. My biggest complaint about the stuff that I have always used was that it takes ages and ages and ages for it to finally dry. There have been times that I have rinsed the surface wash off with lacquer thinner to get it off because it was taking so long to dry.

The petroleum based stuff is basically mineral spirits for the most part and that takes forever to dry as well.
 

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Grow 1705. It’s ligorine, naptha, toluene and isopropol. Quick flash time. High VOC, OSHA rated hazardous. Except for TIG weld prep I use it around the shop for a myriad of things other than paint and body.

 

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Dupont 3812 Enamel Reducer, sold also as PrepSol, The Zone sells a similar product called PrepAll. They're still petroleum-based, but they don't take long to dry. It's a staple for auto detailers for wax and grease removal. Stay far away from lacquer thinner. It'll eat your paint. Denatured alcohol will work on a factory paint job, but if you had your car re-painted, that will eat the paint too.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Dupont 3812 Enamel Reducer, sold also as PrepSol, The Zone sells a similar product called PrepAll. They're still petroleum-based, but they don't take long to dry. It's a staple for auto detailers for wax and grease removal. Stay far away from lacquer thinner. It'll eat your paint. Denatured alcohol will work on a factory paint job, but if you had your car re-painted, that will eat the paint too.

Eat what paint... I'm cleaning bare steel. The old cleaner I have dries fairly fast on the whatever is on the car primer junk but on sanded and blasted steel it takes forever to dry because of the nooks and crannys.
I have about a pint of my old stuff left that I bought several years ago for other projects. I will take a look at some of those and see what the paint guy has at the swapmeet tomorrow. If he doesn't have I'll stop by national coatings next week and see what they have.

I have always had issues with washes not drying fast enough here. Now if I was outside in the summer it would dry great in the 115* even though the humidity is still high but in the shop it's always a problem. I even pointed the heater at the firewall and it doesn't help much. Seems they formulate it for dry climates and for humid ones you just have to deal with longer dry times.

A shot of the firewall before I did some more prep to it. Getting it primed before I weld the aprons on.
 

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I've been using Super Clean. Spray it on, hose it off, and the grease, oil, and grime disappears. I use it for almost everything. The BW even uses it to clean the bathroom and around the kitchen. And it's cheap.
 

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I generally use acetone and a non-fiber shedding cloth like a microfiber.
 

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I also like the SPI wax and grease remover. The only downside is the required 30 minute flash time. SPI also makes a petroleum-based product, which has a quicker flash time, but I've never used it.

Of course, whatever primers you're using is a big factor. For example, SPI does not recommend using petroleum solvents to prep for their epoxy primer. They told on the phone tap water with a bit of Dawn detergent is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No luck at the swapmeet for cleaner. The paint guy didn't bring any with hi this time. I wanted to grab a gallon of gloss black for the engine compartment but he mainly brought lots of arcylic enamel instead of urethane. I was going to grab 5 gallons of lacquer thinner but I didn't bring my hand truck and I didn't want to haul it half a mile... (going price is $40/5 gallons)

Will see what the coatings supplier has. I don't like using cleaners mixed with water on bare steel... Fine on a boat but not for a car. and our city tap water isn't fit to drink let alone put on steel before painting and leave lots of mineral deposits on the bare steel. My old irrigation well actually has less minerals and much lower TDS.

I found the label for the old cleaner I have and it is prepsol and I will not be buying it again as it just takes too long to dry. I went back out an hour later and it still hadn't flashed off...
 

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It all depends of what you are cleaning. I would not use lacquer thinner or acetone over existing primer of paint. It will eat it like paint remover. Its great if you want to clean off bare metal and have it dry quickly.
If you want zero contamination on the metal, like when your TIG welding than I recommend acetone. The price of lacquer thinner is way too expensive to use as a cleaning solvent. Use regular mineral spirits, solvent or paint thinner to clean off grease and oil and then you can lightly spar the surface with lacquer thinner, acetone or brake clean to remove the solvent. That's for drivetrain parts your prepping . Do not get solvent or paint thinner near any autobody parts your going to be applying automotive primer or paint too.


For body paint prep go to an automotive paint supply store and buy "wax and grease" remover to prep panels for paint so it does not damage the existing body filler, primer and paint. You want to be really-really careful with what you use. Everything has to be compatible. You do not want to use a product that will leave a film of some kind and then have it ruin all your work.

You also do not want to wipe-off oil and grease with rag and then accidentally contaminate your nice clean can of wax and grease remover with the oil and grease from your rag.
 

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I guess no one actually reads the previous posts anymore.
Bare metal or painted surfaces, 3812 or PrepSol. Dries faster than water and has been the staple of the industry for decades.
 
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