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Discussion Starter #1
It is a near Doofus because there is no bodily harm or blood (not yet anyways).

This winter I've been slowly replacing my stock strut rods with an adjustable homemade set, I also put in roller spring perches, cleaned-up a mistake on my front disc brake conversion and replaced the old original shock tower bracket bolts (I also stripped and repainted the shock tower brackets). Today I did the final assembly.

The shock tower bracket bolts were starting to spin - their shoulders were rusting away. So I put in new stainless bolts. As I'm tighening them down I manage to snap one clear through. :pissed: That is the doofus. The only way (I know of) to replace these is to remove the spring! :chainsaw: I just did that and I really don't want to face doing it again. :wall: The reason I said there is no blood yet, is I haven't dealt with the spring yet!

Once I can face doing the whole spring removal thing again, I'll put another new bolt in.

Oh and one tip for you folks going to the roller perches, stick your shock in the holes and see if the center has been crimped enough to get a socket on the nut! There just isn't anyway to get to the rear nut with anything besides a socket once the spring is in. (If there is a way to do it, please tell me!!!!!!!)

John Harvey
 

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Compressing springs are such a pain. See if you can jack the front of the car all the way up so all the weight is off the suspension, you might be able to slide that snapped one out. Btw, what type of bolt did you use to replace them? (I need to do the same thing as well)
 

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Why would you need to remove the spring to replace the shock tower bolts? I assume you mean the carriage bolts that go in the top of the shock tower that go through the shock tower cap. Just take the cap off, slide out the remnants of the carriage bolt, slide a new one in and put it back together. Removing the spring won't get you any more access to them.

Now if you're talking about the upper control arm bolts, those need to be grade 8 bolts, and if you snapped one off, they aren't grade 8 (or you put about a billion cagillion ft. lbs. of torque on it).

Hint on installing roller perches (I've done several now): Put the shock in, get BOTH nuts started, and tighten them down a little on one, a little on the other until they are both snug. You can get a 1/2" wrench on the back one (not a socket), but it's a bit tricky and requires a kind of thin wrench (I have some cheapies that I keep around just for these types of jobs).
 

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Now if you're talking about the upper control arm bolts, those need to be grade 8 bolts, and if you snapped one off, they aren't grade 8 (or you put about a billion cagillion ft. lbs. of torque on it).
According to the SAE specs manual, it take 1.7 billion cagillion ft. lbs. of torque. Please post correct info on this site! :pissed:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I used stainless steel (I thought it would be good for rust resistence). In hindsight (always 20/20!) I should have worried more about the grade (5 or 8) then the stainless part.

As far as size goes I just took one of the old bolts to the hardware store and got the same diameter, but a little longer. I used a flat washer, lock washer and nut.

I have stock type springs, they are under many 100 of pounds of pressure when the suspension is at full drop.

John Harvey
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is a shock tower bracket bolt that broke. The top of shock tower (on mine) has a hole in one layer of the steel and a slot on the lower layer. I didn't see any way to get it out with the spring in place (I've got the thick polyurethane spacer) since the spring pushes the spacer right against the bottom of the bolt.

What am I missing?

John Harvey
 

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sounds to me like the doofus part was using the wrong grade of bolt, not snapping it. It's a good thing you snapped a bolt now. Think about shearing a few bolts later, maybe on a freeway onramp, or a hard corner? Someone may have been watching out for you on this deal. :: ::.......I've had a few of those types of doofi ( is that the correct word.. :eek: :eek:) where it seems like something went wrong, but that little something that goes wrong exposes a much bigger problem that could have went wrong later, with really bad possible consequences. I think most of us have done this.
 

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Mess around with it a bit first, John. I had one of mine snap a few months back, and as JohnPro alluded to, you can usually fish them out without having to remove the spring. It definitely takes some wiggling around on both the R&R, but MUCH easier than what you're contemplating!
 

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Did you just you a regular bolt? It seems like the one on mine are a real short carriage bolts since they have a round head which is now flattend from time.
 

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Now if you're talking about the upper control arm bolts, those need to be grade 8 bolts, and if you snapped one off, they aren't grade 8 (or you put about a billion cagillion ft. lbs. of torque on it).
According to the SAE specs manual, it take 1.7 billion cagillion ft. lbs. of torque. Please post correct info on this site! :pissed:
Correct ....That's why he went for a quick well deserved nap after snapping it....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
A stainless steel carriage bolt of the appropriate diameter, you need the shoulders to keep it from spinning.

John Harvey
 
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