Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,293 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been kindly given a damaged repro Shelby hood for my 66 coupe. It was damaged after my friend, after a quick underhood "peek and tweak" at the track forgot to replace his hood pins....well you can guess what happened when he got up to speed !!!

I've yet to do a thorough inspection, but from my recollection the metal frame is a little bent, and the fiberglass has cracked at the rear of the hood and scoop.

Anyone ever attempt to repair this sort of damage? Any suggestions as to how I should go about it? Do you think I'll be able to repair it to the point where I can use hinges, or am I now doomed to a 4 hood pin world...? TIA - Dickson

BTW, even damaged it still looks awfully cool in wimbeldon white with blue Lemans stripes...../forums/images/icons/cool.gif
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,928 Posts
If the frame is bent... thats a fairly easy fix... if its "tweaked" then its gonna be tough to ever get your lines right. You'll probably end up breaking more glass by the time you spring it the other way in bringing it back to square.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
I saw on Speedchannel's Dream Car Garage Shelby Episode where they rebuilt a shelby hood that had the same damage.

Check it out. They replace the metal framing, repaired the damaged hood...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,293 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
It does not have to be perfect. This is NOT meant to be a car for show - it's destined for around the town and track (I hope).

Frankly, I'm trying my best to use ALL used / refurbished parts where possible to keep the costs down. With thos lowered appearance expectations, I hope this hood will work. TIA - Dickson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
Damaged fiberglass components go in my [color:blue]'Hall of Shame'</font color=blue>/forums/images/icons/shocked.gif. I presently have a hood there. No plans for any additions.

I believe that the glass can be repaired. Usually epoxies are used to strengthen the glass parts that are seperated. Then the entire assemble is glassed/resined over. After that, primer, fill, primer, etc... Paint gets applied last. The first time my hall of shame item broke, I had it repaired. Second time, it was time to retire the hood to my garage ceiling.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,294 Posts
I have recently done the job myself. I repaired the rear corners on my hood, as well as the front ones. It is a fairly easy job..... I think fiberglass is really easy to work with. Just remember after you fiberglass, then spread a thin layer of body filler over it, and smooth it out. Then you need to get some "icing" or glazing putty, take a razor blade, and spread a super thin layer of that over the filler. Then use like 400 grit sand paper to sand that smooth. Mine turned out great..... if you need any other help, just PM me.

Good Luck with the hood......

EDIT: I forgot to mention you need to sand your fiberglass smooth first, and it may take 2 or three layers of glass.... just be sure to get it smooth before the filler, and be sure to get the filler smooth before the glazing putty /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top