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67 mustang that I bought 3 years ago and upon purchasing the car I filled the gas tank up at a gas station. Here the last several months when I go to fill it up it only takes a few gallons and then pukes out the gas. Had to push the car into the garage the other day due to a battery problem and while pushing the car from the back as we pushed it over a small bump I could hear gas sloshing around which to me indicates I am low on fuel. I have a 5 gallon gas can at the garage so I started putting gas into the car and after about a gallon it puked gas out. Btw the gas gauge does not work. What is causing this??

thanks
 

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I could not tell you what the odometer reading was. But when I hear sloshing in the tank that I believe usually means the tank is getting low on gas
 

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It pukes gas when you fill because there is no vent hose to allow the air to escape. Try filling it slowly and this should allow the air to escape when the gas displaces it.
 

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Gas tank filling issues are common. If you are using the handle latch on the nozzle you have to latch it in the first notch and let the gas trickle into the tank. If you try to latch it in the last notch the fumes will trip the latch and cut the flow. You just have to be patient when filling the tank on these old Mustangs.
 

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Rotate the nozzle 90 degrees and don't go past the first click on the nozzle....slow and easy.
 

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I usually turn the filler nozzle 45 degrees while filling, and as has been suggested, I fill it slow. I also don't care if the pump stops at $24.57. Once it clicks off, it's full. I pay with CC anyway so what do I care? If you don't top it off, you won't have to worry about it puking.
 

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This helps me in filling these old tanks, I installed a clear filler hose between a modified entry point and the tank. When I fill the tank, I open the tank and watch the fuel entry. As others have stated, fill slow and allow for the fuel to replace the air.
 

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Yep. I listen to the change in the sound of the fuel going in. I click the handle off and back on a few times to get it full and not have to wear it. Learned about 27 years ago, depending on what the gauge showed how much needs to go in. At -almost- "E", I can get in 14.5 gallons. If you fill it slam full on a hot day, it may still expand and push out the filler cap as the cool fuel and vapor from underground tanks increases temp and pressure on the cap seal. When I park my car and shut it off quickly I can hear the fuel slosh even on a nearly full tank.
 

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Nature of the beast.
Some stations type of filler necks work better than others. Especially he in Cali. The nozzles with the big long vapor return rubber piece that looks like a full blown Accordion are a REAL PAIN.

Like others said, slow and easy and listen.
Also helps if you can find a spot where you can get the nose of the Stang down hill to help keep an air pocket forming at the front of the tank.
The air pocket syndrome is even worse with a '69 & '70 tank.
 

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Nature of the beast.
Some stations type of filler necks work better than others. Especially he in Cali. The nozzles with the big long vapor return rubber piece that looks like a full blown Accordion are a REAL PAIN.

Like others said, slow and easy and listen.
Also helps if you can find a spot where you can get the nose of the Stang down hill to help keep an air pocket forming at the front of the tank.
The air pocket syndrome is even worse with a '69 & '70 tank.
I wonder if adding a vent in the top of the tank and running the hose to a canister? Didn't the do that in the late 60s and 70s. I never understood their existence, but, now I'm starting to understand the need.
 

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Nature of the beast.
Some stations type of filler necks work better than others. Especially he in Cali. The nozzles with the big long vapor return rubber piece that looks like a full blown Accordion are a REAL PAIN.

Like others said, slow and easy and listen.
Also helps if you can find a spot where you can get the nose of the Stang down hill to help keep an air pocket forming at the front of the tank.
The air pocket syndrome is even worse with a '69 & '70 tank.
I wonder if adding a vent in the top of the tank and running the hose to a canister? Didn't the do that in the late 60s and 70s. I never understood their existence, but, now I'm starting to understand the need.
no need for a canister, just run it back to the top of the filler neck.

Not my picture
 

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yeah its especially hard in california with the vapor return nozzles... i can count on one hand the amount of times i've filled up and NOT had a least a 1/4 gallon of fuel on the ground during it.


I added a vent to my filler neck that did help a little, but its all about the angle of the pump nozzle .... theres a... romancing you'll need to do to make sure it doesn't "seal" like it wants to.
and dont even think about using the auto pump little toggle on the pump handle... you need to hold the pump down yourself


another thing - i've run out of gas with my 20 gallon tank, and even then the most I was able to get into it was 15 gallons. you have to assume the last couple gallons in the tank aren't really usable based on the stock fuel pump setup - as well as gonna half at least a gallon of "air" in there.
 
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