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Discussion Starter #1
mocked up in the car.

The first picture was the original mock up in 2008 with UCAs I made my self but didn't like them so I did pick up an aftermarket set of UCAs.


I used this mockup layout and made brackets and installed it in the car. I modified the LCAs. They are boxed in and have screw in ball joints and spherical bearings at the inner pivot.


After the initial install I did not like the ride height, and I needed more room for the sway bar link so I shortened the upper mount by 2" and lengthened the lower mount by 1".

Obviously the design is nothing new as setups like this have been produced for the Mustang for years but it was a fun project and a bunch less $$ to do it myself.

For those of you wondering what the advantage of this setup is here is something I wrote on the subject:

First let me start by saying that the OEM Mustang suspension is really very good. The basic concepts are there to have excellent handling. I have heard from more than one autocross driver that are quite fond of the OEM mustang design even over more modern suspensions like the Mustang II. This is not to say that you can take a bone stock Mustang and turn in fantastic times on the autocross course. The design is good but the OEM equipment is a little lacking. I have found that the formula IMHO to having an excellent handling Mustang using the OEM design is:

medium rate front spring performance but not harsh 400# range
performance shocks
1" sway bar
adjustable strut rods
roller perches
1" UCA drop
performance alignment.

I have run this setup for years and am very happy with it. This combination will handle extremely well and the ride is not bad but the ride is still not a smooth as a modern car. With that said there is room for improvement. and that is where the full coil over front suspension comes in. (full coilover where the coil mounts to the LCA not to be confused with the less expensive kits where the coilover mounts to the UCA)

When it comes to the advantages of this design, the simplest way to explain it is to picture a modern strut. The strut attaches directly to the spindle so all road changes are transmitted immediately from the spindle to the spring shock combo with out any other movement of any other parts. Road vibrations are more effectively transferred directly into the spring and shock, where it is absorbed improving ride quality. A coil over or modern strut type front suspension also has better leverage from the spindle to the spring compared to the OEM Mustang setup. This is because the location of a stock Mustang spring perch is approximately centered between the pivot shaft of the upper control arm and the ball joint. In its simplest terms the spring is acting on a 6" lever (the UCA) The result of this is adequate but minimal leverage between the arm and spring. By relocating the lower coil-over mount closer to the spindle on the LCA, the length (of the "lever") increase to about 12" which is a vast improvement over the UCA mounting location. This allows for more consistent tire to road contact and allows you to run a softer springs without sacrificing tire to road contact which, in turn, again improves ride quality. A classic Mustang with one of these kits will respond in the front more like a new car due to improve control of wheel movement over changes in the road without increasing the stiffness of the front suspension, which in turn maintains the excellent handling potential of the OEM design but improves ride quality over a stock suspension.

Many Coil over kits also provide complete adjustability in aligning the car and most coil over shocks can be adjusted in both stiffness and spring location, resulting in adjustable ride quality and ride height.

This is not to be confused with a coil over kit that attaches to the UCA in place of the spring perch. IMHO other than ride height adjustability there is no advantage of this over an OEM type spring and shock combo sitting on a roller spring perch, especially given the cost.
 

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Looks familiar... :cool:

That strut rod connection to the LCA should be reconsidered. If you brake hard enough it will bend for sure or worse, snap. We have lots of time and money invested in real world driving and FEA studies to prove it. Be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Looks familiar... :cool:

That strut rod connection to the LCA should be reconsidered. If you brake hard enough it will bend for sure or worse, snap. We have lots of time and money invested in real world driving and FEA studies to prove it. Be careful.
Thanks for the heads up, I really appreciate it! When I mocked it up, that clevis seamed insufficient and I am already planning on addressing that. The mount that the clevis attaches to is 3/8" plate so lots of strength there. Then the clevis will be replaced with a solid rod end and I will make an "L" bracket that bolts in to the lower shock mount and creates an upper location for the solid rod end to bolt into so that it will be in double sheer.
 
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