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Been watching FB Market Place and Craigslist for an anvil, prices are outrageous! Really wanted a nice 200 pounder, but considered making my own small one out of section of railroad track. Was quoted $20 per foot plus $10 per cut. Found a home made one on Facebook Market Place for $50. Guy said I was the first one that responded and within a couple hours of posting he had 8 more people wanting it.
I wish they had left a little more on the base for stability and weight but it should do most of what I want to do by the time I cut a big oak stump to attach it too.
I will probably round and smooth the pointed end a little and I also have a couple railroad track base plates I could weld on the bottom. May grind top a little flatter. Considering the $300 to $1,000 prices I have been seeing for regular anvils, I am happy.
 

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I'm going through the same mental gyrations and will probably do likewise. My sister-in-law is a farrier and she has one that makes me drool when I see it, just can't swing the $500+ price tag. Yours looks like it would fit the bill nicely for me.
 

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They seem to go by the pound. Good ones are definitely hard to find. I was supposed to pick up my late father-in-law's anvil from
his days at SF Railroad but I don't think I have enough truck or any way to load a 250# one. (the stand it's on is probably another 200)
The room available in my garage is also at a premium for something I'd use 2 days worth out of a year.
 

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The room available in my garage is also at a premium for something I'd use 2 days worth out of a year.
But there's the cool factor, and the pleasure of just looking at it.
 

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I had a 200 lb anvil stolen from my garage a few years ago.

After the Civil War the anvil traveled from Georgia to Arkansas then to Oklahoma. My Dad took it from the family farm in 1970 and we hauled it around until my Dad passed in 1995, then I had it until some SOB decided they needed it worse than I did.
 

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Been watching FB Market Place and Craigslist for an anvil, prices are outrageous! Really wanted a nice 200 pounder, but considered making my own small one out of section of railroad track. Was quoted $20 per foot plus $10 per cut. Found a home made one on Facebook Market Place for $50. Guy said I was the first one that responded and within a couple hours of posting he had 8 more people wanting it.
I wish they had left a little more on the base for stability and weight but it should do most of what I want to do by the time I cut a big oak stump to attach it too.
I will probably round and smooth the pointed end a little and I also have a couple railroad track base plates I could weld on the bottom. May grind top a little flatter. Considering the $300 to $1,000 prices I have been seeing for regular anvils, I am happy.
they didn't cut much if anything off the base except for front to back length side to side looks stock as that is a piece of rail road track, and so is the one mounted on a pipe welded to a wheel.
 

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It looks like people really like using pieces of old Railroad Track to make Anvils!!

:eek:)

Tony K.
 

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Saw a couple anvils at the swap meet and both were asking $650 .
I'll stick with the 12 inches of railroad track that I paid $5 for .
 

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Railroad iron is often the only available similar material people can get their hands on to work with. It took a while with a decent sized torch to cut mine off. I can't imagine how difficult it would be to dress it up more "anvilish" like some folks do. I just needed something to beat on at the time. Don't think I've used it for more than a doorstop for ten years or so. I have a big vise that has not been so lucky.


I was lucky enough to inherit an 80-90 pounder some years back. Not having an actual forge, I don't feel like I do enough "hot" work to warrant it having a stand. (You're actually not supposed to beat cold steel on an anvil.) I need to finally figure out SOME place to keep it though. It's wandered all around the shop. I've seen some people use anvils (and vises!) purely for decoration. I don't have that kind of shop, not the room.
 

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I ran into a great deal on one in a junk shop a couple of weeks ago. Can you believe it? $5! However, I think it's a little bit small to be very useful. (Lemon for scale)

I just had to have it though. I'm gonna hang it and use it to hold my hat.
 

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I was lucky enough to inherit an 80-90 pounder some years back. Not having an actual forge, I don't feel like I do enough "hot" work to warrant it having a stand. (You're actually not supposed to beat cold steel on an anvil.) I need to finally figure out SOME place to keep it though. It's wandered all around the shop. I've seen some people use anvils (and vises!) purely for decoration. I don't have that kind of shop, not the room.



There's always more room for something fun (I wish). I have a 24" school bell I'm trying to figure out what to do with. I don't have a fireplace anymore. I considered converting the chimney to a bell tower. HOA doesn't like that idea and it's a bit heavy. Afraid to put it in the yard. Really don't need kids ringing the bell in the middle of the night.



Nice anvil, I wouldn't be able to part with it.
 

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My dad has a good sized antique anvil he's trying to sell. I might take it except for 2 problems: Where to put this thing for the 2 times a Year I may use it, and the working surfaces aren't flat anymore. I don't think there's any good way to add material to repair it ?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
My dad has a good sized antique anvil he's trying to sell. I might take it except for 2 problems: Where to put this thing for the 2 times a Year I may use it, and the working surfaces aren't flat anymore. I don't think there's any good way to add material to repair it ?
Although you can add metal, it isn't good idea. To really do it right the anvil needs to be re tempered afterwards. The welded material has a tendency to be a little harder and more brittle than the rest of the anvil. Also has to be tempered to restore it's "ring". A lot of old timers judge an anvil by the bell like sound that it has when struck. A dull sound that dies down quickly usually indicates an anvil that has been beat down and possibly repaired or one of the cheap oriental imports. A high quality one from one of the old world manufacturers will have a clear sweat ring that sustains itself for several seconds.
 
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