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My opinion will differ slightly from the others. I'm doubting you got that for a bargain price, but to me it almost always comes down to price and available funds. Just don't commit more cash than you are willing to douse with lighter fluid and set on fire because that might be exactly what you're doing buying it sight unseen.

But you already volunteered that this is your first time buying and you're not experienced with them. I think that probably means you should listen to the people cautioning you against doing this without a thorough inspection.

How much are we talking about being at risk if you just go for it?
 

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Wow i'm overwhelmed by all of your thoughtful responses - thank you! I will absolutely hire a 3rd party to inspect before committing to anything

Here's the car in question, she's just outside of Minneapolis. It's nearly identical to the '66 my grandmother used to drive so it has some sentimental draw for me

@myfirstcar66 @Mike the old grump @geicoman58 @Still workin' on my 66 @Maxum96 @cj428mach @awhtx @patrickstapler @Israel @image98
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Where at outside of Minneapolis? I may know someone in the area that could take a look at it for you. If you'd prefer, feel free to private message me.

John
 

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I hired an inspector as the car auction was in another state. He sent me 100+ pictures including inside the doors and floor pans. He was unable to drive it and it Had a lot of small mechanical and electrical issues. But fixing those is much less expensive than doing body/rust work.
 

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We are not trying to rain on you parade but if you have any experience with old mustang, you know that they all rust (most of us all know all too well from experience). The car looks good from the pictures but they usually all do and it's too easy to fall in love. These cars were never designed to last 50 years and add a few minor or not so minor fender benders..... Plus this care is from Minnesota which is in the rust belt. It may vey well be a great car just be cautious.
 

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Door tag indicates factory 76B and tahoe torques so the deluxe interior and paint is factory correct. I noticed an engine tag (metal) still attached to the engine. This could be a repop or
if factory, rather rare as most have been lost/displaced through the years.

One of my favorite colors. I had a 65 convertible painted that color (from springtime yellow) back in 92. Turned out really nice.

Ron
 

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I used my State Farm agent to put me in contact with a State Farm agent near the car I was interested in. I then asked that agent for the appraiser they use for antique car valuations. It cost me about $250 each time I did this. On the first one the appraiser called to say the car was definitely misrepresented. Saved me going from Detroit to South Carolina to discover that. The 2nd time I did this the appraiser said "run don't walk to get this one". My wife and I flew to Scottsdale and bought a 69 Cougar XR-7 vert. It had some mechanical and electrical issues, but that is therapeutic work to me. I didn't buy it sight unseen, but I did put down a $2000 deposit to secure the car until I could see it and hopefully complete the deal. Since they only made 4000 XR-7 verts in 69, I knew I would likely have to travel to get one.
 

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Wow i'm overwhelmed by all of your thoughtful responses - thank you! I will absolutely hire a 3rd party to inspect before committing to anything

Here's the car in question, she's just outside of Minneapolis. I've been searching high and low for the past year and this is one of the only cars in my price range that fits my criteria: 289 Convertible, Tahoe Turquoise, Pony Interior, two tone paneling, wood inlay. I love it!

@myfirstcar66 @Mike the old grump @geicoman58 @Still workin' on my 66 @Maxum96 @cj428mach @awhtx @patrickstapler @Israel @image98
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Be sure that the inspector you pick is experienced with first gen Mustangs, knows what to look for and Where to look,....
 

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I am sure people with nice classic cars would be sensible enough to only drive them in the summer.
They were driven for 25 years before they were ever considered classics
 

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It was built in Dearborn MI and delivered to Des Moines IA, so it may have spent its whole life in the rust belt. That doesn't mean it its guaranteed to be a rust bucket though. Pics of the underside of the car would tell us a lot more. Looks nice on the surface.
 

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These are 50 year old cars, they were daily drivers for Many years,.....
These are 50 year old cars, they were daily drivers for Many years,.....
Just because it's in Minnesota now doesn't mean it originally came from Minnesota. I've bought several cars that originally came from other states that were dry as a bone - New Mexico/Colorado/Texas etc...all bought in the Northeast. But provenance does help as to know where it "may" have come from. But I would listen to others - I've been fooling around for classic cars for 4 decades - and I thought I would never get burned - but I did - the last car I bought this past February.

I sold my previous car (a mustang fastback) sight unseen (the best body I ever had) and then chased after a car I owned several years ago and missed by one day. Then I emotionally bought a car out of Texas on just a few pictures - (boy did they look good lol) and and like a rebound relationship I screwed up. The car was supposed to be excellent and I paid an excellent price what I got was a good car so I paid more than I should have. Now I have to either sell and lose about 18% of my money (1300 to ship too) or take it down to bare metal and spend more time and money and see what is under the paint - yikes!,

Just make sure if you do get burned you can afford it - hell life was made for regrets - Go for it!,

Dean
 

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I would pay the money for an inspection. Even then, you will find surprises when you get it home.
 

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I AGREE with everyone!! Please find a third party to inspect it. A full inspection! Like not just who will see if the vehicle runs/shifts in gear! I bought mine locally inspected it the best I could (no car experience, just basic things to look for). Got a 3rd party too also for the loan only to realize months later that the inspector only made sure the vehicle started and shifted into gear! It took 8 months for me to get the vehicle from the guy I bought it from only to have it a few hrs and the money pit has started!! However, this 65 Convertible is my dream car as well! Just make sure you do your part as best as you can and go from there. Good luck and congratulations!!
 

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Red Flag 2: Convertible in MN.

Time travel back 55 years. These were relatively cheap cars (as mentioned before) that were driven 365. Convertibles leak air all the time and are tough to heat. In the winter, they are dogs. Heavier, drafty, can't see out the rear window, etc. They are not stored in garages for 6 months a year.

Tops fail (year 5 or so) start to leak, rust behind the rear seat, in addition to all the other places the cars rusted.

Convertibles and the snow belt do not get along. I am in Texas, and the convertibles that are brought here from up north are dogs, and often are basically parts cars.

The one in the picture is pretty, but enough Bondo and Paint can make a pig into a prom queen.
 

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I found this place when I was looking. Didn’t end up using them as I flew out to see the car myself. So I have no idea how good they are, but better than nothing. I liked the idea of asking an insurance agent. Good luck.

 

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I found this place when I was looking. Didn’t end up using them as I flew out to see the car myself. So I have no idea how good they are, but better than nothing. I liked the idea of asking an insurance agent. Good luck.

Hey everyone! I'm purchasing an '66 Mustang Convertible C code 289 V8 automatic sight unseen (not traveling due to covid and will have vehicle shipped cross country)

I've been dreaming of buying this exact car since I was a kid and couldn't be more excited. But this is my first classic car purchase and I'm a novice when it comes to anything mechanical. Any advice for vehicle due diligence that can be done remotely? What kind of questions should I be asking the seller to root out problems and major repair expenses?

Any advice would be much appreciated!
 
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