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When I stripped car I discovered the passenger seat pan was smashed to fit non mustang seat, I am replacing that allready, I then noticed a small rust deposit in 3 of 4 corners or the pans <Driver front and back and Passanger front, now these are small after I grinded the rust away from inside and under car , My friend suggests not replacing pan but since small and mostly rust free , I should use fiberglass.
Would that be solid enough and last ? Sorry I'm new but I wont drive my family in a car thats not safe of sound.
advice welcomed thank you
www.tradeshoworlando.com/mustang
Vinny ;)
 

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I would cut out the affected area and if small enough, weld in regular sheet metal. Fiberglass is a band-aid patch and will start to rust again. If you want it safe, new metal is the way to go. But I'm an engineer and I over do everything to ensure my a$$ is covered. Just my opinion. ::
 

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If you have the welding skills, make small metal patches and do it right. You don't want to be someone who is referred to as "you won't believe what my PO did to the car" ;) Fiberglass would work as long as the damage is not in a "load" bearing spot, but it's always better to patch it with metal and then POR or something to prevent future rust. My .02 worth.
 
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If the rust has not penetrated (if you can't easily poke a hole in the sheetmetal with a screwdriver or scratch awl), you might consider the POR-15 products. The current issue of Mustang Monthly magazine has an article on no-weld floor rust repair using the Paint Over Rust products - including a type of fiberglass cloth. You definitely want to use a rust-killing product in conjunction with any sort of fiberglass repair, otherwise the rust will be back bigger and uglier.

If you've got rust-through, go ahead and replace the metal - but only the portion needed. Leave as much original steel as you can.

BTW, nice web page.
 

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I'd really hate to see you get carried away with something so minor. A little floor pan rust doesn't make the car unsafe. POR-15 makes a product they call POR-Patch. It comes in a squeeze tube. It's just a thicker form of POR-15. Cost is about $14 a tube. Squeeze out a little onto the rusty spot and trowel it flat. You don't even have to remove the rust. It'll stick and set up hard. It works. Its cheap. Its fast. What's the last time you got those three qualities in one product?
 

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I'd really hate to see you get carried away with something so minor. A little floor pan rust doesn't make the car unsafe. POR-15 makes a product they call POR-Patch. It comes in a squeeze tube. It's just a thicker form of POR-15. Cost is about $14 a tube. Squeeze out a little onto the rusty spot and trowel it flat. You don't even have to remove the rust. It'll stick and set up hard. It works. Its cheap. Its fast. What's the last time you got those three qualities in one product?
You're partially right, only a properly prepaired metal patch will last until rust eats the rest of the car around it. It's also more solid than your way (which is the 'new way' to make these repairs).

I say if you have a welder, some experiance usign the welder, you're best bet is to weld a patch in there like i did.

If you didn't have a welder or any experiance at all i'd suggust you're way with the POR-15 stuff. ::
 
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