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Discussion Starter #1
Well yesterday was the day the car's owner took the car home (more or less over my desire to keep it here to debug the electrical system). I got an email today saying that as she was close to home the brakes starting going out and they were completely out when she got home - had to coast through the last stop sign. She lives in the foothills so stopping at home was no problem, being uphill. However, she cannot leave the driveway since it is a long, twisting downhill stretch. She reports that the pedal goes to the floor without stopping the car. I asked her to check the brake fluid level (I am thinking that the master cylinder is no good, that I did something in adjusting the rod from the booster which may have burst a seal or something.) If the fluid level is ok, then I figure there is air in the system somewhere, although having bled the brakes twice, I don't know what can be the problem. I figure that if there are no leaks, then I should check the adjustment nut on the rod from the booster by taking it off, putting locktite on the threads, then putting the nut back on, check the brake engagement/stop points, keep adjusting the nut to get that correct, raise the pedal height maybe another inch for safety/more travel, then bleed the master cylinder and rebleed the 4 wheel cylinders. If that doesn't cure the problem, I don't know what to do - it is a brand new SSBC booster and mastercylinder combination. It worked perfectly except that the brake pedal was about 6 inches up from the gas pedal. I removed the booster and master cylinder to remove the rod to the brake pedal and cut it an inch, then re-assembled everything. Is it possible that I have a bad check valve on the booster or need to put a hose clamp on the rubber vacuum hose where it meets with the metal pipe from the intake?

As for the horn, I pulled off the steering wheel and laid a screw driver across the horn contacts - horns sounded. When the steering wheel was on, I checked the horn contacts and they have juice. apparently, pushing on the center doesn't make a contact with the horn contacts. How is the 66 stock horn "button" supposed to contact those two horn contacts? I don't see how the metal of the horn ring or whatever it is called can contact the two metal prongs. Is there some other part which is supposed to fit under the horn ring so as to make the contact? Seems like there should be something like a washer or whatever under the spring so that pushing the horn ring pushes the washer against the contacts. None of my books have a diagram. Does someone have a stock 66 standard steering wheel they are willing to look into to see whether I am missing something? I checked my 65 and it looks like the 66. grr.

Ok, for the real bummer issue. This car is now about 85 miles away from my house. I will have to drive up there to work on the car. I figure to drive up and get the brakes fixed and maybe the horn, install the rocker moldings, and then tell the owner forget it. She took the car knowing it had electrical problems and after giving me a deadline, so I don't feel beholden to her, although I sure would like to get it perfect. This is a friend, though, so it is tough to do something which might hurt the friendship. Meanwhile, now I have to drive almost 200 miles over the weekend to work on the car. Bummer!!!!
 

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Ken - Sounds like a leak in the brake system and you need to slide the steering column up a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What would be the effect of sliding the steering column up a bit? Right now, after installing the steering wheel on the shaft, there are only 3 threads or so showing above the nut. I don't think there is play to move up the column. Also, sliding the column might reposition the column, but it will not change the relative distance between the horn contacts and the horn button will it? Are you saying that if I slide the column down, the horn contacts will extend up further so as to make contact with something when the horn is pressed? When the column is moved, do the internal guts move with the column? Are not the "guts" mounted to the column or is there a plate or something on the shaft that they mount to? All very confusing to me. BTW, I think the column is already bottomed out at the firewall. Thanks for the advice, I just don't know how to apply it.
 

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The steering column can slide up and down without affecting the steering shaft and wheel position. The turn signal cam assembly and horn buttons bottom out on a plate attached to the steering column. By moving the column up, you can bring the horn buttons closer to the steering wheel assembly (where the horn buttons contact the back of the steering wheel) so you can close the horn contacts. To move the column, loosen the two bolts holding it in under the dash and pull like the dickens!
 

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Ken, like midlife and prairebronze said, the horn contacts are mounted to the column, not the shaft. The shaft is rigid and goes into the steering gear box. Think of the column as just a removeable cover over it. It can slide up and down (along with the horn contacts).

Now since the column is rigid and the steering wheel is bolted to it, if the column is slid down too far, so are the horn contacts and they can't ever touch the metal collar in the steering wheel's horn button. If you slide it up and the horns sound all the time, you've gone too far ;)
 

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Maybe an entirely different approach...

...tell her to call a repair shop, have them pick it up, diagnose, and repair the problems.

Assuming you are beholden to her, you can pay for it (or split the cost). If you're not, then tell her she's on her own. (Knowing you, I don't think that likely, though.)
 
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