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Discussion Starter #1
I dug up some old photos of my 68 coupe that I thought would be fun to share. Although now the car is shown in the trailered concours class, it was a hard driven Mustang that had the scars to prove it. If these parts can be restored, I believe almost anything can. The dust shields, spindles, axle, springs, etc., in the older pictures are the same parts in the restored parts photos.


1998 - Rear Axle, etc.

http://www.tucsonpony.com/badaxle.jpg


2002 - Rear Axle, etc.

http://www.tucsonpony.com/raxle2.jpg



1998 - Front Spindle and Dust Shield

http://www.tucsonpony.com/badbreak.jpg


2001 - Front Spindle and Dust Shield

http://www.tucsonpony.com/brakes2.jpg
 

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I really didn't mean you never drove it, I cringe to think of throwing a pick axe onto the gas tank though LOL. Imagine the sandblasting the under carriage went through while plowing through the desert too! The "after" pix look better than new.
 

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Darn you! Darn you! Darn you! Darn you! :: Your car is so beautiful! Any words of encouragement for us non-concourse non-trailered restorers? Once again, nice car.
 

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It's kind of interesting, because other than the suspension parts, the undercarriage has always been in excellent shape despite the awful places that I drove the car. But, the damage to the front and rear suspension parts more than made up for that. ::
 

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Thanks! Patience is the biggest key. Just take your time in restoring each part. For example, the dust shields were one of the hardest to restore as you can see by the condition. Repros aren't available for 68 and I couldn't find any NOS or good used ones. Chuck sandblasted most of the rust off, then I spent several hours sanding them by hand to further smooth them. Then, we used Metal2Metal to smooth the surfaces, putting thin layers on and sanding after each one. It took several days to get them done, but it was worth it. You can even read the "FoMoCo" logo on one of the shields. So, basically, take your time and use good materials and you can do a great restoration of most parts.
 

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Truly a work of love, absolutely beautiful :: :D ::
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It didn't get driven very much in Michigan, and very little, if any of that rust came from there. The problem was when I attended the University of Cincinnati, the car had to sit a couple of winters in snowed-in parking lots with snow almost up to the axles. That really took its toll on the suspension. The undercarriage, however, was untouched and there was no cancerous-type rust at all on either the body or the floorpans. What you see in these photos (along with the driveshaft) is the worst of it. I also did a little damage driving the car across the desert. :eek:
 
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