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Discussion Starter #1
I assume that forged pistons are better, but are they that much more reliable than cast? building the roller engine, just wanted some opinions.

College Station, TX
 
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Discussion Starter #2
cast pistons will allmost allways work ok. It's my opinion that unless you are supercharging, running nitrous, or something like that, forged pistons are not needed unless you have a big pocket book.
 

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Forged pistons are more durable under high heat and cylinder pressures....conditions commonly experienced in heavy duty service or racing..

For most street folks and weekend warriors, the newer hypereutectic pistons are fine....

If I was building an engine for my street car, that's what I would use....

Pat
http://www.jps.net/binay/webdocs/strtmstng002_sml.JPG
 

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When I was building my 302 to put in my 66 I asked the same question. The engine was to be mildly modified. Cam, intake, carb, headers. People told me that cast would work just fine as long as I stayed away from Nitrous or heavy racing. And the price is a lot better! I bought 8 stock cast pistons for the price of around 2 forged.

Lancaster, South Carolina
66 Coupe, 302, Auto, 3.25 gears. [color:red]Candyapple Red</font color=red> with White Pearl Stripes. Cragars.
http://web.infoave.net/~ronniek
 

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I agree with Pat. Hypereutectic pistons are a good comprimise between regular cast pistons and forged pistons. Hypereutectic alloys are tougher and more wear resistant than regular cast pistons due to their high silicon content. Keith Black has an excellent selection of hypereutectic pistons, as do others.

Phil

'65 Convertible (with many mods.)
http://www.blueriver.net/~finite/Pony.htm
 

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Forged pistons also require more clearance, resulting in some piston slap until it warms up.

[color:blue]68 GT500[color:blue]
[color:green]68 1/2 CJ Coupe</font color=green>

[color:red]MCA# 18519[color:red]
 
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Discussion Starter #10
What would happen if you used nitrous with hypereutectic pistons?

Jon Sherar/ 67 Fastback
 
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Discussion Starter #13
I know the original topic here is pistons, but I don't agree with the Nitrous concerns. If you get a mild (150 horsepower or less) nitrous kit, you will probably be fine with cast pistons. The main key is to make sure you have sufficient fuel supply and a little less than normal ignition timing. Nitrous actually acts as a shock absorber in the cylinder, and when used properly, will put much LESS wear on an engine than other "power adders" such as a big cam, which produces power at higher rpms. Nitrous produces additional power throughout the rpm range. I ran a 150 horsepower kit on my '68 Coupe for two years back in the early 1980s with no problems, and the motor is still running strong today (I now have a blower with those same cast pistons). I just wish I had not sold the nitrous, because I'd be putting it on my convertible right now!

'68 Coupe, Modified 289 w/ Holley blower
'65 Convertible (future 66 Shelby GT350 clone)
'65 427 Cobra S/C Replica
 
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