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Discussion Starter #1
So I've noticed most suppliers have 3 or 4 options. Probably not doing this until spring/summer 2020. But thought I'd get the basics and logistics out of the way.

My car is a 68' V8 C code, with front drum brakes that work pretty well for what they are, as I had to rebuild them. I've read extensively about it on here, on CSRP and other sites. Just for fun my photo is from when I was redoing all 4 drum brakes, wheel cylinders, master cyl last April. Quite cheap, but the old ones sat so many years they were quite rotten. So I went ahead and did them. Ball joints, control arms everything is new except the knuckle & spindle.

Going by the CSRP example:

Option 1 kit - The Full kit that uses existing drump brake spindles like I have. Uses a 4-piston caliper. 67-68 disc and drum spindles were one and the same. Though this is the easiest route I'm questioning re-using 51 year old Spindles. Haven't put a mic on them but I can see some wear. Rotors between the opt1 opt3 look different.

(Opt 2 is the Granada) - But Why? Not sure why anyone would go w/a reproduction Grenada based spindle when a native 68' style is available?

Option 3 kit - The 68' Full kit that uses a Single Piston with 68' Vintage style new knuckles and spindles. Obviously going to be extra work to replace those and re-do the alignment. I noted the opt 3 kit is single piston where as opt 1 is 4 piston.

Option 4 is the 99-04 brakes. Not going there.

The costs difference for power-assist on 1 & 3 are not huge. I'm sure there are many here who have done both from CSRP or other common suppliers. Which one was the best result and experience during and after the swap? I'm sure there has to be differences besides the level of effort to rebuild/install them.

**Also was wondering if when the brakes and Master Cylinder are out if this is a good time to yank out the steering box for inspection & rebuild too? Seems like you'd have a chance of getting it out through the top with the master cyl out of the way. Still meditating on that one.

Cheers!

Jonathan
 

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Wear on your spindles? like the bearings have spun on them? I'm not aware of any aftermarket spindles that are forged like the ford units, I would verify the new spindles are forged if you go that route. I would opt for the 67 style brakes myself if i was converting drums. I would call chockostang and order up one of his kits and send him your steering box for a rebuild while you're in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You can see visibly that there is wear. Not surprising after 51 years. But judging by how lightly worn the inside of the original 289 piston bores, and bearings were (all original parts) this was probably not a super high mileage car! Proper way to do this would be to mic them. But then I'd have a buy another caliper tool. Oh well. Very tempted to go the easy route for once. I've done most things the hardest way.

Good point to check how they are made and that they aren't China Taiwain made cheapies. But then again, how many miles am I going to put on this Stang driving weekends in Spring, Summer & Fall? Maybe 5k a year? 10k at best if I got regular tags instead of Vintage.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I went with your Option 1 with power, bought from Open Tracker, and I love them.
Oh yes, I bought my 4 Bilstein shocks from them. I love the Bilsteins and couldn't find them anywhere else in-stock and at sane prices. I will check out their options, right now actually.

Looks like the same kit CSRP has. Most prices between 3 providers I've looked at are in the same ballpark.

Still looking for someone who did the spindle swap for 68' disc type spindles.
 

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Several years ago the only option to put disc brakes on an early Mustang was to buy a very expensive original Kelsey Hayes setup. Then Ford came out with the Granada and Maverick and those systems were very cheap in the junk yards and they were a bolt-on swap for Mustangs. As I recall I paid $50 for my entire Granada spindle/caliper/rotor setup.Then the chinese started reproducing the KH calipers and the price came down.

Where is there wear on your spindles? There are no moving parts on a spindle so there should be no wear.
Opentracker sells the CSRP kits.
 

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Option 2 and 3 are the worst. I have factory '68 discs and I don't like them. They work well, but the non-floating single piston caliper is a crap design. Option 1 with the Wilwood kit is what I plan on replacing my factory discs with.

 

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If the drum brakes work fine then why replace them? FWIW, when it comes to heavy-duty brakes on semi's, etc., drum brakes are still very popular.
 

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Oh yes, I bought my 4 Bilstein shocks from them. I love the Bilsteins and couldn't find them anywhere else in-stock and at sane prices. I will check out their options, right now actually.

Looks like the same kit CSRP has. Most prices between 3 providers I've looked at are in the same ballpark.

Still looking for someone who did the spindle swap for 68' disc type spindles.
I would say if you’re going to change spindles, might as well upgrade to the 70-73 mustang spindles. Uses larger inner and outer bearings. You’d have to change to 70-73 outer tie rods, but that’s easy. And you just get a brake kit that fits the 70-73 car...

I use these spindles http://www.streetortrack.com/Big-Spindles-pr-24430.html Specifically, I use the OEM disc brake spindles. Super high quality piece.


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Discussion Starter #11
@Woodchuck I Though I'll admit they're better than I would have thought due to being set up well, I need the stopping distance and heat disappating properties of power disc brakes. It's hard to explain to someone that doesn't drive around here often, but drivers here in D.C. are insanely aggressive and stupid. The only way to beat them is to sometimes be way more agressive (get away) and smarter ;) So I can feel a point where I smash pedal and get no more stop. With disc brakes it's much more linear. We need that here when some Honda jumps in front of you because you did the right thing and left a following distance to the next car in front of you. Plus our traffic stop and go can run up into heat fade.

Option 2 and 3 are the worst. I have factory '68 discs and I don't like them. They work well, but the non-floating single piston caliper is a crap design. Option 1 with the Wilwood kit is what I plan on replacing my factory discs with.

That CJ Pony kit from Wildwood sure has some nice calipers and big rotors But it says it fits 'some' 14" and 15" wheels. I've got a nice set of 15" American Racing Torque Thrusts that are staying ;) Plus that kit does not include any Master Cylinder, or power booster. But thanks for the input on the single-piston setup being poor. If they work well what is the crap in the design? Did a piston seize on you?
 
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