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For my '66 track coupe I need to add front disc brakes.

Would you recommend spending around $500 on an original setup (with dual MC added) ?

Or should I save those bucks and spend even more to upgrade to a better aftermarket system?

Thanks for any advice. Dickson
 

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I have an original factory setup that I added the dual MC on my vert. It works quite well. (stops much better than drums) Floating Calipers are supposed to be better, but I really haven't seen that much difference.
 

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I would start with the factory 4 pot KH's. Skip the splash shields, duct the center of the spindlepin/hub, run Portfield R4 pads and slotted rotors. This setup works pretty darn good. If you get too much brake, your lap times will increase (too much reliance on the brakes and not enough emphasis on cornering skills). When I can find all the pieces for the Lincoln caliper upgrade, I'll do it to match a few order sleathy upgrades.

Just my $0.02.
 

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If you are building it as a track car save your money for an aftermarket Hi Performance set up
 

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I have the 4 pots on the 67 and the sliders on the Boss.
I only just got the Boss to actually stop during open track, but this required rebuilding the whole system and using Porterfield R4S pads. It was the pads that finally made it work. These pads modulate REAL well and work well under pretty hard useage.
At Pacific Raceways (SIR) there are two corners back-to-back that fry brakes. The first is 125+ down to 60 braking followed by 100+ (downhill -- a very steep grade) down to 40. The Boss brakes can barely handle this abuse on a 3330 pound car plus me (225). Last year I just fried a set of stock pads.

I have no open track experience with the 4 pot -- although for street brakes they work well (assisted).

However, as Dinosawnj noted he's looking for something bigger. Like the Lincoln 12x1.25 system.
What we are looking for here is not so much size as we are mass. The heavier the rotors the more heat you can put into them. You do have to get the heat out (which is why the ducting works), but the mass makes it harder for them to hit their thermal limit on any one corner.
The Lincoln setup is a good era-correct system and it will stop you -- real well. But putting more weight at the outer extremity of my spindle is not some place I'm going. This suspension does not need more unsprung weight (IMO).
Therefore I'm opting for an aluminum hat, separate rotor, aluminum hub (cost is high though) and aluminum calipers. This system is near 20 lbs lighter (each wheel) than the Lincoln stuff. Plus I want 13x1.25 because there is no such thing as too much brake. Ask the guys in the Porsches.

BossBill
 

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that $500 will get you a nice granada setup with rebuilt calipers and new rotors but if i'm not mistaken a "stock" one if fairly rare.I just remember hearing the tail of trying to get an original proprtioning valve for a 65. Then after buying it havng to send it out to be rebuilt. The granada setup for all practical purposes looks like the 1966 factory setup. Its just the MCA judging that is picky. If your looking to stop the car under normal driving conditions the granada setup works fine. Its only if your planning on racing that larger disc diameter, vented, and drilled makes a difference. It will have more than enough power to lock up the front brake if you push the pedal hard enough. It just does not go to any great extend to prevent overheating. This is really no different than what they still sell to today for stock setups.

Unless you have a compelling reason not to use the granada setup its the cheapest and simplest way to go.
 

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Just remember that the big aftermarket brakes usually need larger than 15" wheels. On the stock side of ledger, I believe Opentracker is using Granada brakes. I believe SSB is selling an upgrade to single piston systems that offer slotted rotors and upgraded calipers for around $300.

Don't forget to get 70+ spindles.
 

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The club I run the majority of open tracks with actually still runs timed events by class. Because of this, I need to run stock brakes or take an uncompetitive two class bump. The Lincoln caliper/LTD rotor is a sleathly upgrade as to the nake eye through the wheel there is no difference. The alumunin hat would be a dead giveaway. The setup I am after utilizes the 68 LTD rotor (11.4764" diameter). The rotor is only 1/2" larger in diameter than the stock 66 rotor and weight is 2 to 3% range. This difference in sprung vs. unsprung weight can easily be offset by inverse mounting the shocks and eliminating the splash shields. Bigger weight savings come in your choice of wheels utilized. The big difference is in the size of the caliper pistons and pads that has a significant effect on the clamping power. I run ducts and have never incurred rotor cooling issues.

Bob.
 

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The weight savings for going full alumin is prob closer to 10/wheel, not 20 as I stated.
When I get all the pieces I'll weigh em and let ya'll know.
I have the entire spindle/rotor/caliper off of the 67 in one lump-- anybody curious?

You are in the same class as a friend who is only allowed to go as far as the TransAm brakes (Lincoln/LTD) on his
65 GT350. Vintage rules, so to speak. In other words you can't do all the fun lightweight/restomish stuff I'm going to.
Then again you get competitive fun and I just get Open Track.

Now if I run the lightweight brakes and lightweight rims...

BossBill
 
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