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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im surfing online and not really finding what Im looking for.

I want to mount a covered box near the battery that has a main power wire and main ground wire.

To minimize the amount of clutter, I dont want individual power and ground wires. Plus, where would I get multiple power leads?

Inside the box I want to mount my relays and fuses for the various electrical components that I want to add or take off the factory harness.

I probably need room for 6 or 8 relays. Lights, horns, choke, fog lights, EAPS.

I want to do this in my 65 and 67, so the same box wired the same would be much easier.
 

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You will probably want a box like Cougar70 shows AND a couple bus bars to handle main power and ground distribution.

I bought this:


and

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Right, so I cant buy a box that is compact and an all in one? Relays, fuses, bus bar.

I havent seen one.

Im betting that I can find one on a Honda at the Pull-A-Part.
 

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I bought a box similar to that one and installed it in my Jeep. Just ran a 50 amp fused feed from the battery to the box. I use it for solenoid power to control my winch, along with auxilary lights. It has switch legs for the relays so they can be remotely operated by switches in the cab. Very nice setup, exactly what I wanted to build.(but didn't have to)
 

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You are going to run power to it from the battery side of the starter solenoid on the firewall. That is where the original power that supplied everything but the starter's positive cable comes from. You do not want a ground at the power distribution box unless you want it to go up in smoke. Everything there is 12V positive only.

For the ground side you want a cable from the battery to the block, preferably connected close to the starter. That's your engine ground. Then you need a ground from the block to the firewall. That is your body ground. Both must be there.

Your not running ground wires back to one terminal because body is the ground. You connect the grounds of each circuit to the body and that eliminates having ground wires running all over the place. The grounds will flow through the body, to the cable on the firewall, to the block and from the cable on the block back to the negative post of the battery.
 

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Hi
I just recently ordered this for my 65 Mustang to be used under the hood as a battery junction box. I was going to make my own but this was more cost effective since I didn't have the crimp tools and would have source all the different wire and terminals. The company was very easy to work with. The box is made to order the way you want it. Got it in 3 days time. Here is an article about the same setup that someone built himself. Very good insight to using one of these setups.

747263
 

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Later model Fords have very nice ground buses. They connect to the body with a copper bolt and they have 4 to 6 threaded holes for a screw and wire with a ring terminal. And it is very compact. In my TBird there are at least 6 of these on the car. Wish I could find a picture.
 

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When I put in my headlight relays I tucked the box in under the battery to keep it out of the way. The positive comes from the battery side of the solenoid, and the ground is to the battery negative cable on the engine under the alternator.

I'm not sure where the negative cable goes on your 289, but on the 200 this keeps everything pretty compact and out of the way. Plus both my positive and negative sides are only one hop from the battery so I figure that's a pretty good connection.
 

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I was not motivated by clutter reduction, so I used something like this as my fuse bus (they are available in different sizes and circuits):

 

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You DO realize that the Mustang has, basically, ONE power feed wire, attached to the solenoid "common" post that runs inside the passenger compartment to the fuse box and ignition switch and, from there, to all the various switches, etc., and out to the various components. Relocating all those circuits to a fuse box in the engine compartment means you're going to have not one, but however many "power wires" going through the firewall where you're going to pretty much be scrapping the under-dash harness and custom wiring everything? You'd be much better off, if you want decent circuit protection, to put ONE mega-fuse between the solenoid and the main power feed wire and "updating" the fuse box in the passenger compartment so you can keep the factory (or equivalent) harness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The headlights and horn are the two biggest power draws. Im probably going to put an electric fan on the 67. Both cars have an electric choke.

No interior rewire required for any of those items.
 

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The headlights and horn are the two biggest power draws. Im probably going to put an electric fan on the 67. Both cars have an electric choke.

No interior rewire required for any of those items.
FWIW, if you install a horn relay you can eliminate the power feed to the horn switch.
 
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