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Discussion Starter #1
This weekend I chased the pesky poltergeist that keeps pushing my temperature gauge to the right. With the advice of my fellow Ghostbusters from the VMF, I tried to arm myself with the proper items to do battle. The first one I tried to get was a correct temp sending unit. The local Auto parts stores proved useless. The kid at Pep Boys told me the computers only go back as far as 1968 and when he went to the books, I realized that he wasn’t really sure how they worked. Okay, on to plan 2, I buy a cheap ($12.99) mechanical temperature gauge and do the temporary install. Run the engine a while: staying cool. Drive around a bit: still cool. In fact, some of my neighbor stopped to see if I needed assistance because I was pulled over with my head under the hood checking the gauge. I filled them in on my quest and sent them on their way. Now the true test, I let it idle with the AC running, the temp moves to just over 230. Drive it and it comes back down. Looks like most of my problems were with the sensor. I’m ordering a new one from VA Mustang today. The bad thing is when I shut the engine off with the temp over 230; it will not restart until it cools down some. Once it’s below 230 or so, starts right up no problem. Just when you contain one, there’s always one more ghost isn’t there?

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Tim,

I didn't see your earlier posts. So, sorry if this is repetative.

I don't have AC in my car...so that's a big difference. But, my car never even gets up to the middle of the temp guage since I put in a 4 row radiator, a fan shroud, and the proper spacer.

You could lower your temperature my installing a radiator cap with a lower pressure setting, but this will mean you'll be loosing coolant when the heat load is really hitting the radiator. What I'm saying here is...is water will only get so hot before it boils off. The more pressure you allow, the higher that temperature is. As steam leaves the radiator it takes heat with it...BUT...if you start running out of water in the radiator...you'll be pretty much screwed.

To get to my point...you probably ought to look at cooling system upgrades to keep your temp down, rather than figure out how to make it start after it gets real hot. Just my idea of where the cart goes in relationship to the horse.

Good luck!

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've done the same thing to try to keep this thing cooler. I upgraded from a 3-row to a 4-row radiator, have about and inch and a half between the radiator and fan and have the stock shroud. I've back flushed the cooling system - it runs through clear as can be. And I use 13 lb cap instead of a 14.

The engine is newly rebuilt and supposedly never bored. It has a higher performance cam and Chevy valves. I wouldn't think that would effect the heat that much. I've only ever timed it by feel. I bought a timing light on last week but it hasn't made it here yet. I know if the timing is retarded too much that can cause excess heat. Oh yeah, I have water wetter added to the 50/50 mix also.

If the timing is okay, I guess my next step is a Edelbrock water pump...
 

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Makes sense. Since you have a '66, I'm assuming that means your water pump has the backing plate on it. Those should be a lot easier to find. I had a milodon for mine, then figured out it wouldn't fit, because my '65 doesn't have that plate.

What about a fan clutch? Does your car have a fan clutch? It so, have you checked it?

Phil
 

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The not able to restart at 230 degrees is probably do to the gas boiling either in the carburator or the fuel line. A spacer under the carburetor may help if you don't already have one. Check the fuel line and make sure it is not to close to the engine or header.

You've pretty much done everything i can think of to kill off the ghost. One thing else that comes to mind is using coated headers or wrapped headers to try to push more heat down the exhaust pipe rather than radiating it under the hood.

Another thing is if your fuel mixture is too lean that can also cause overheating. As a test you could try to add a bit more fuel to your idle mixture, maybe 1/4 - 1/2 a turn. Since your only overheating at idle i wouldn't touch the rest of the adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I replaced the clutch fan it had in it when I got it with the correct 17" 5-blade. The one thing that puzzles me though: I also replaced the water pump pulley with a correct (and chromed) unit. The one that was on there was about 1/4" smaller in diameter. It guess that one actually improved water flow. I checked every source including the VMF and the one I have on there now is supposed to be correct. I've never seen the smaller one in any of the catalogs, and I threw away the old one - it was scored pretty badly.
 

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Tim,

I meant the clutch unit itself. My car doesn't even have one. All I've got is a solid spacer. But your car evidently has a clutch mechanism that allows the fan to spin at less than engine rpm, once the revs are up. What I'm wondering is if it is possible that your clutch is spinning slow at idle as well. This would cause the hot condition at idle, with the a/c on that you describe. As I say, my engine doesn't even have one, so I'm no expert on it.

Phil
 
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