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I saved up money 2 1/2 years ago to buy my mustang, it was in rough shape. I was 17 when I bought it and had no idea what I was doing and got ripped off by the PO. Turned out to be in a lot worse shape then originally thought. I ended up having to teach myself everything I needed to know to fix it (I don't know much). I honestly did everything without the help of a single person (other then you guys on here) and that I am proud of. Here I am 2 and 1/2 years later and I finally get my car on the road and drove it to school yesterday. I couldn't be more happy. Got it here and heard a few laughs as its not that best looking car in the world, but I could deal with the jokes I mean who else had a 67 mustang on campus....well just about a half an hour ago I heard and noise. It was without a doubt a ford engine. I thought to myself that sounds just like my car. I heard the doors open and slam and thought that sounds just like a mustangs doors slamming. I ran over to the window and sure enough there sat an immaculate 67 coupe. My heart dropped. Here I thought I had something to be proud of, but now realize it's just a joke. I don't have thousands of dollars to dump into my car or the knowledge to get there. It was just a reminder of a dream that seemingly will never be fulfilled.

Not looking for sympathy, but I love my car and just wanted to share with some cars guys that would understand.

Thanks for listening...
 

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oh quit complaning ! i'm just now working on a 65 fastback i bought in 1974 ! it was to be completed by june BUT that may not happen ! i'v owned mustangs since 1973 and some never got finished ! i had people call my mustang and 68 torino fastback "CLUNKERS "! ha ha both are worth more then their modern stuff will be 5 years from now and i can work on mine. in 1973 i got my first mustang, a 66 coupe with a bad transmission and wore out engine. i was 15 years old and didnt know "S" about cars. my dad told me if i wanted it to run i'd have to fix it myself. i complained !!! he said i could use his tools and he bought me a hardback chiltons mustang manual. that was the begining of the best fun i was going to have my entire life. i got that mustang running with the money from my part time jobs and several months later bought a 65 FB GT yellow on black from the woman that bought it new. the story goes on ! your only 17 ! what does it matter if no one but you likes your mustang ! so what if people laugh ! to hell with them ! man you gotta car that has outlasted anyone elses popularity ! it can take years to complete a project. all those people with the newer stuff cant touch what you got ! my 66 station wagon looked like a backwoods cow patty hauler but the 460 and 4 speed outran a lotta nice lookin stuff and the owners took their cars and hid and i bragged !!! dont give up and you'll finish your car. just lay off the complaining cause thats a waste of time when you could be workin on your MUSTANG ! Behold pictures of my "SHEET BOX WAGON" and a 66 mustang i never finished ! BOTH blew the doors off some nice looking cars including REAL shelbys ! i got the last laugh with the station wagon , YYEEESSS HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA !!!!! i'm proud of both these cars especially the station wagon , and it sure looks like a moonshine hauler to certain people , yes "certain people" ! a long time ago i had (2) 8x12 prints of the mustang foto made. i framed one and hung it on my living room wall and my friend in the foto framed the other one and hung it in his living room. i'm on the left.
 

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I didn't have money to restore cars when I was your age. I still don't and I do pretty well now days.
Learn to wheel and deal, take what you learned about cars and start making money on the side with it. I learned to work on cars the same way, being poor and owning broke *** cars, It eventually turned into 7 ASE certifications while I put myself through school.
Why do you think only old people drive nice restored cars? or rich kids, but they don't count.
 

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Geeze...why so glum chum? lol You'll get there...there's a couple ways to do it without buying them already restored...save save save and pay a "professional" to restore it...you'll learn nothing and have a nice ride...or you'll learn nevero waste your hard earned money paying somebody else to rip you off and do a crappy job when you could have done it your self for free!

Which brings me to the 2nd way...

Google google google...its a LOT of research and headaches rebuilding a car yourself with a low budget..lots of planning...but you also learn alot and no one can take that away from you...or the satisfaction that "Man...I built this."

Just dont be afraid to take things apart...rip it apart..figure it out and put it back together...you might make mistakes but ya cant look at it that way with these cars...Its a journey...and when your driving across country on a road trip with the windows or top down...in your freshly waxed classic mustang...listening to Elvis...or the Beatles...or CCR...whatever...there's nothing better. Well...almost nothing ;)

Lay your hands to work...see it through...it's worth it!


Ryan
 

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after i got my first 66 running with a good used 289 i got a 2v to 4v adapter and a rochchester QJ and tried to put it on. it wasnt a tight seal so i tried tie wiring the carb to the intake. still wouldnt start. gee i wonder why !!!!! i went to put the 2V carb back on and dropped a nut(not me) down the intake and learned what it was like to pull a head on an engine. i was 15 years old.
 

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Well Supershifter2... 15 is alittle late to drop a Nut...but better late than never, right?? right! LOL
 

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HaHa it's all in good fun...And what good is a "venting thread" if ya cant laugh it off after...
 

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hang in there buddy...my first car I took to school was an 84 Mustang with the incredible 3.8L engine. Yes, I said incredible, but was laying the sarcasm on pretty thick. The first day I had it there a buddy laughed at it too.

In the grand scheme of things, this will be a great story down the road. Hang in there, getting your car running after 2.5 years means you know more about cars than just about everyone else in HS. Honestly, you probably know more about cars than 90% of the population ourside of HS, too.
 

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it could be worse ! you could be drivin a ........... vega !!! OH NONONONONONONONONONO !!!!!!!
 

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Been there, done that.

I'm 20 (nearly 21) now, and I bought my '66 mustang when I was 17 in high school.

My mustang was the one with the rusted out quarter, faded paint, and an engine tick. In my high school of 2000, there were several other classic mustangs. 3 or 4, if I remember correctly. All of them had new paint jobs and were more-or-less restored.

I bought every part and every flake of rust on that car with money I earned working minimum wage jobs. My parents paid my car insurance, but other than that, didn't help at all. I know that the other guys couldn't say that. I always took a great amount of satisfaction from that.

Now i'm a junior Mechanical Engineer in college. My current mustang, a '67, is a daily driver. Same story, faded-*** paint. But i bought a refurbished lincoln welder and taught myself to weld about a year ago. I replaced the floors, battery apron, added a PS torque box, and made my own roller spring perches.

I'm broke as $#!T and go to school full time but I work 25 hours as a manager at the campus dining center.

It can be done. And I do have a social life, too. Find your balance, set your goals, and stick to it.

When I started, I was the guy on here asking about how to gap a spark plug and advance timing. Now I've got 1800 VMF posts under my belt and I'm giving people welding advice and writing HOW-TO articles for headlight relays.

-Matt
 

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I ran over to the window and sure enough there sat an immaculate 67 coupe.
Yeah, that mom or dad bought them, (probably paid to much), and still owe on it. And I bet the driver knows nothing about fixing it.

My heart dropped. Here I thought I had something to be proud of, but now realize it's just a joke.
But it's not a joke, the PO wasn't up front with what it needed.
So it's not the best looking car, who cares, it's your car.
Bought and paid for! People might snicker, but I bet they'd love to own one.

I don't have thousands of dollars to dump into my car or the knowledge to get there. It was just a reminder of a dream that seemingly will never be fulfilled.

Don't be so hard on yourself, have faith, it will get done.
Restoring a classic car while having to concentrate on studying is like swimming against the current. You'll get there, just not a quick as you'd like.

Not looking for sympathy, but I love my car and just wanted to share with some cars guys that would understand.

Thanks for listening...
An ugly-duckling story usually has a happy ending....
Cheer up...

As Super said...at least you're not driving a Vega, or worse an AMC Gremlin!
 

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It's not about money, it's about experience. I have driven plenty of piles in my day, and when the nay-sayers see that you *are* capable of fulfilling a dream through hard work and perseverance, then I say that makes you a better person in the end.
"Wow! That's the same POS I saw you in last summer?"
"Nah. Finished it and sold it so I could buy this one, but here's some pix. This one was about the same condition as the other one when I started, but I finished it in February."
It's OK to dream, but you have to follow through and this is the hardest part for most people. Don't let some knucklehead with money discourage you. Use it as a goal. "Mine will be like that, only better." My old 53 Chevy truck was a piece, but when I was driving it down the road blasting Sex Pistols on the boom box on the seat (in order to try to overcome the lack of a muffler - died by backfire) I was in heaven and people got the hell out of my way. Live in the now, dream about the future and actualize your goals. It all starts with a well laid out plan.
 

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The first time I drove my '66 (I was 15) the muffler fell off. When I got it there was a tree growing through the floor.

Don't worry, you'll get there. Some of us out there do understand your frustration though. Just remember, there is fun in the journey, as well as the destination.
 

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Most, if not all of the others at school with the popular cars have a daddy that buys their status in life. At least you have the feeling that what you have was built by you with real friends (here on VMF) helping you learn as you go. Each time you look at it or start it up, or go for a drive, you have the feeling of greater accomplishment than tossing money out too buy one.

I learned from experience. My older brother always got what he wanted, even though dad did not have the money to spare. Big brother was always getting tickets and dad was always paying them too. I came along and if I wanted a car, I had to graduate, get a job and save up to buy it. Then I only got a 1962 Fairlane 4 door with a 221 V8. Today, my brother is still mooching from mom and day and cannot manage his own money. What I have came from years of hard knocks and learning as I go.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
You guys are awesome, sometimes you just feel like "but I have to have it now" and "story of my life." I have a great appreciation for this forum and for the guys on hear and I had no one to talk to about my car woes, thanks everybody.
 

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Hang in there KL. Sounds like you've got a good start and the desire to do things for yourself. More than I can say for a lot of youth these days. I'm sure the guys on here can give you hundreds of examples of pieces of crap cars we bought when we were young but got through them. Most of them would probably even say they wish they had a lot of them back now.

When I was 17, I bought a 63 Chevy Nova 2 door coup from a buddy in my auto mechanics class for $275. It was all original, staight as a string with perfect chrome. It was red with...oh... 2 turquoise front fenders. Working part time at Long John Silvers didn't get me much money and with a brother, 5 sisters and not a lot of income for my Dad, I didn't even consider asking my parents for help buying anything. I'd like to have a dollar for everytime I got laughed at by the kids with their newer cars. I'd have enough to finish my Mustang restoration. But you know what? I didn't care. I had a car, I bought it myself, and in the end, I had a beautiful paint job on it and everyone (that had an appreciation for old cars) thought it was beautiful. Yes, I wish I had it back now.

Long story short, keep after it. Don't worry about others. There will always be one nicer. Heck, I look at the pictures of the cars on this forum and think about the piece of junk I have compared to theirs but it's mine and I love it.

Stay positive. It's a growing process and it looks like you've got a good handle on it.
 

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you just feel like "but I have to have it now"
Most can relate when they think back to your age. It all comes down to goal-setting and motivation. You probably go to some car shows like a lot of us. Here's a suggestion...next time you go, take time to visit with some 55-65 year old guys (I'm 75 :lol:). Ask if they built the car and if so, how long did it take them to complete it. At times, you will be pretty amazed. Example...at a show last year, my wife and I took a break from "baby sitting" our car and did what I suggested. We came up on the most gorgeous '47 Ford convertible you ever saw. I asked my standard questions and learned that he was self-taught and did ALL the work himself in an old type single car garage (he had a picture of it). The car was virtually a stock looking except for an almost undetectable, slight chop of the metal center top support so that it didn't "pooch up" quite so much in that area. Subtle, but very creative and nice. A couple of other things I recall is that he used the 2 dash- located ashtrays for a/c outlets and he fabricated his own fender skirts out of relatively flat metal vs. the aftermarket ones that people bought back in the day (they sort of "buldged out"). Again, thinking out of the perverbial box. He volunteered that this was his first time to show the car and of course, I asked how long he had been working on it...he casually said, "23 years". He said that like many people, he never had much money and bought any necessary parts one or two at a time every month or so. Patience and perservance...
 

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I honestly wouldn't worry about it at all. You are restoring you're car to how YOU want it... just because somebody's mommy and daddy got them something finished is not something to let get under your skin. It will take more time than his, but you will have done everything and know every inch of that car. Chances are he can't wrench on it when something goes either.

And remember a half finished Mustang is still better than anything else out there. It's not a joke... just a work in progress, which most kids your age have no conception of.
 

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My parents wouldn't let me get a car until I graduated from High School, even if I could afford to buy one myself. They even traded in a beat up 66 Mustang convertible for $75 in 76 for a Granada when I was 14. The first time they let me drive one of their cars was to the prom, then they let me have their old car to commute to college (You guessed it, the Granada).
 
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