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Greetings fellow Mustang lovers. I just picked up a '67 convertible. The engine and tranny are intact and with a minor rebuild would probably run great, but here is my problem. The floor from the front of the front seats to the firewall are pretty much gone in several places. This includes everything that was below the floor plates also being eaten by rust. The back passenger area (from the rear of the front buckets) to the front of the rear seat is also in the same shape. This meaning that in several places the frame is having the "swiss-cheese" effect. Now, understanding this is a convertable and the car could be subject to breaking in half if this is not properly fixed and strengthened, can anyone here offer tips, pointers etc for strengthening my frame as i remove the rotted portions and install "fresh metal"?
I have a complete floor pan for the car and all the framing from firewall to trunk from a donor car, conveniently available and already cut out and laying beside the car when i picked it up for $900. I do not intend to rebuild the motor, as I think just picking up a rebuilt or crate motor from ford would be my best option. I am wanting to put in about $4k to get this beauty back to road worthy and drive-able condition. (this meaning primer applied with alot of the amenities still needing to be replaced/repaired. Also the top mechanics are all sound, just the actual pads and top/rear window are gone.
Any thoughts, comments, suggestions, do's and do-not's are hugely appreciated. I am looking to get it road worthy as fast as possible and as safely as possible.
Thanks for providing hours of enjoyable and informative reading!
A.J.
 
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the best thing i can think of to really strengthen the unibody is the chassis strengthening kit at mustangs plus. since u have to do all those repairs u might as well throw it on. its about $ 350 and is mostly just abunch of strengthening plates and torque boxes and what not. its supposed to be really good but i have no personal experience with it.another way to go would be subframe connectors. i plan to get some for my 66 but havent got around to it yet.
 

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Considering all of the structural pieces that need replacement and that you do not have a top like a coupe to help keep your car aligned, you you may have trouble getting your car aligned correctly. Mustangs Plus does sell strengthening kits that are part of a larger kit for making a coupe into a "hartop convertible." They clearly state in those instructions to install all reinforcements underneath before cutting the top off. While their kit may be even better than what Ford put on the convertibles, that installation or the repairs you describe already may put you in front of the "Eight Ball" and getting undesireable results. Unless you are a real pro at this, you may need a pro with a usable jig.

I do not mean to say I know more about this, but I have seen some swayback verts and what you described makes me concerned as to possible results.

Russ

Last year at Knott's, I'll get a better picture this year!
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1595962&a=12199293&p=45322944.JPG
 

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Gee, I don't want to sound like a nay-sayer but the floor is the structural integrity for a convertible. If the floor is that far gone and the frame rails are also rusted to the point of needing replacement or reinforcement, my take is that this is not a do-it-yourself job. Better to spend your money having a pro do the floors and frame, then save as much as you can doing the less critical things that can be done over later if while learning you do a less than perfect job.

That said, if you need to do this yourself, keep in mind that the reinforcement kits are meant to strengthen a good floor that now has to carry the structural load by themselves when the hardtop is cut off. They are designed to prevent excessive cowl shake on converted cars, not to hold one together while the floor and frame is repaired.

Be sure that the car is supported well enough that no damaged area is supporting more than its own weight. That shouldl minimize twisting and sagging. You might want to get some 2x4's to rest the body and frame rails on until you actually start to work on them. That might provide enough reinforcement along a sufficient length to ensure that the car stays straight.

Good luck with the project. I admire all of you guys that have the willingness and the patience to take on these projects. I hope it turns out great!

Our Ponies
http://www.ultranet.com/~bpratt/images/Mach1painted.jpg http://www.ultranet.com/~bpratt/images/65vert.jpg
 
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Thanks for the information. As I said I am willing to take on the floor replacement and frame resto myself, but although i am very decent with a welder and torch, I think i will look into my local shops and see what they can do for my situation and at what cost. I truelly think that $1000 bucks of my budget spent in this area is well worth it. You never know, since the car will be totally stripped down to just the unibody and frame (as far stripped as I can get it), that may help with the cost since they wont have to disassemble or reassemble anything other then the frame and floor they are to repair/restore. I'll keep you guys posted on my progress and by all means, keep throwing out ideas. I think it may be a good idea to get one of the affore mentioned kits and put it on after I get the car back from the shop with the new floor and frame put in.
A.J
 

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We did an all the bolts out and parts off media blasting on my 67 vert. Cleaned it up, then etch primed it. That made it allot easier to find all the rust, body damage, etc. then do the repairs. Mine had hidden pinholes in floorboards and a little hidden rust around the left rear tire. While the rust was small, it was allot for a so called rust free car.

Big downside to media blasting the car isn't the blasting cost, but that you feel obligated to purchase and install new parts. Ouch$



Russ

Last year at Knott's, I'll get a better picture this year!
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1595962&a=12199293&p=45322944.JPG
 
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