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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had two extra door locks from some door shells I purchased over the ten year restoration. I know I trashed the pass. lock bc it was dinged up pretty bad.

So its time to assemble the door mechs. I took apart both extra door locks and layed out all the tumblers. I traced the key to get an idea of the tumbler lengths. I know I needed to keep the top tumbler half with the lock body. I worked one tumbler at a time, and eventualy made all of them work!

It only took about a half an hour. Maybe it was luck, but now have a "new" original door lock for the pass. door.
 

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Just think how much money you saved by not going
to a locksmith!

I have also re-keyed a few door locks and ignition
cylinders with success, if you have a key that is
worn then it can be a little more challenging.
I have a box with tumblers from several old locks
so that I have all the combinations that are used.
 

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White Elephant Guy
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When I bought my fastbasck it had a few different keys. I don't recall if it was one per key cylinder, but it might have been. A friend of my dad's is a locksmith and got the two doors and ignition to use the same key. I never investigated getting the trunk lock to use the same key, but it would be nice.
 

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obsidianspider said:
I never investigated getting the trunk lock to use the same key, but it would be nice.
The trunk lock uses a different key blank, the
slots are different hence the rectangular head
and oval key heads. Police cars would have special
trunk lock cylinders so every lock uses the same key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The way I understand it is, the top tumblers go with a specific cylinder. Carefully pry up the tumbler retainer from the side. It a stainless cover about 1/8" wide by about 3/4" long. I used a screwdriver and twisted it to force the cover open. Under the cover you should find 5 holes. In each hole there is a spring and two tumblers. Layout the springs and top tumblers in order. Note the top of the upper tumbler has a boss on it to locate the spring. These parts match the cylinder body and when lined up correctly allow the key to turn. The lower tumblers are sized to the key cuts. These lower tumblers are are what you swap around to match a key.

I layed my key on some graph paper and traced it to get an idea of what size lower tumblers I needed to look for. Then start trying different lower tumblers in one hole at a time to find the right one that allows the key to turn. You need to use the upper tumbler and spring in combination to get the correct operation. When you find a set that works, lay them aside and move on to the next hole. The lock will work with only one of the five sets installed, but it will be easy to pick. I would use at least 4-5 tumblers.

HTH
 
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