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I'm about to finish putting the engine back together, and haven't so much as touched the body in over a year. My biggest fear is that I'll eventually find that there is no shop that will do the cut & weld rust remediation needed for less than the car will be worth when it's done.

Half the time I want to just kick it into gear and get it finished. The other half I want to post it for sale and eat the loss. I have come to the realization that I like the engine work, but don't like the project work and quite frankly I'd be happy to see the thing just go.
 

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I stalled when it became time to start sanding lol. Sometimes ya gotta walk away and take a break.
Im with you on this. I'm doing everything BUT start sanding on my car to avoid it. Granted my paint is not perfect, but I worked on it so much to get it to where it is now, once that first sheet starts sanding on the fender, there is no going back.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Definitely - My major focus this summer was to install an ClassicAir A/C system in the car as I live in Houston. I put a lot of smaller issues on the same plate as well, but nothing major, and what was supposed to be an A/C install turned into fixing wiring issues from PO, finding that my cowl was leaking and fixing that, and numerous other issues that you find out about when you go in to fix the "small issues". I get frustrated, especially when I am upside down in my car trying to fix wiring in my dash, but overall, once you get "over the hump", its very satisfying.

I am finally starting to put mine back together (3 months later), and knowing that I am a few weeks from driving it again makes it worth it.

I added a $500 A/C system to my garage that made working in the car at this time of year tolerable. BlakeTX has a thread of what various people are doing, which gave me some additional ideas.
Hey from Beaumont
 

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There are two ways that I have found to get me out of motivation slump. The first way is simple, find a hard deadline and promise yourself (and others around you for peer pressure purposes) that you will be done at that point. This could be your anniversary, for instance, and you promise your wife you'll take her out to dinner in the Mustang. Or, in my case, tell yourself that you are leaving for a roadtrip on day X no matter what, floor pans or not!

The other way is to re-experience why you wanted to rebuild the car in the first place. The best way to do this is the get a ride in a friend's/fellow VMFer's Mustang to remind you what the end product looks like. If you don't know anyone who can give you a ride, the next best option is to just do a lot of reading/watching the stories of other people finishing their cars and getting out and enjoying them. That usually gets me motivated enough to get out there and turn some wrenches.

Now go get it done and keep us updated!

Ken
 

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Now add this Texas heat my progress has stopped.
You have your heat in the summer and I have the cold in the winter. Frankly, I would rather have the cold as I have a garage. Once you get working, ypu don't notice the cold to much. I also have a propane heater I can run for 30 minutes to take the edge off.

We could move to southern California and have good weather all year. Wait. What am I thinking????
 

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Hash tag ME TOO, LOL. I've gone through burn out on my car so many times I lost count. The other thing that impacts my car project is is that all kinds of other things that have to be done have to be done and take time away from working on the car. I also have a serious health condition that makes me really tired a lot and pretty much kills my motivation and enthusiasm. I am not giving up on it though.
 

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I have had several, but there is one that sticks out in my mind..

Back in 2010, I had just finished installing my motor and trans, and got the car fired up. I was elated! Tore the car apart, got the mechanical bits back in, and it ran!

But a few weeks later, the engine started running funny. Random misses, backfires (more like a pop thru the carb), which would cause the car to buck rather violently under power. This went on for months... advice from fellow car friends, every carb and timing adjustment I could think of, spark plug changes, triple checking firing order... nothing seemed to cure it.

This chump was definitely stumped.

It got to a point where I started thinking to myself “You know what, i’m just not cut out to be working on a car. I obviously don’t have the chops to work on cars” I started thinking about selling the car. Months of not being able to get the car running right, doubting myself, I figured it was time to move on.

In my moment of self loathing, I was staring at the engine, and a little something caught my eye. I had trimmed the two wires coming from the distributor (i have a MSD billet dizzy) when I wired up the ignition. So, when following the purple and green wires, when it got the to point where I had shortened them, I made the bone head move of crossing them (instead of green to green and purple to purple, it was green to purple and purple to green).

I corrected the wiring snafu and guess what?? Ran like a champ. Crisis averted. Lesson learned and unforgettable.


Sent from the interwebs... where else?
 

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There are two ways that I have found to get me out of motivation slump. The first way is simple, find a hard deadline and promise yourself (and others around you for peer pressure purposes) that you will be done at that point. This could be your anniversary, for instance, and you promise your wife you'll take her out to dinner in the Mustang. Or, in my case, tell yourself that you are leaving for a roadtrip on day X no matter what, floor pans or not!

The other way is to re-experience why you wanted to rebuild the car in the first place. The best way to do this is the get a ride in a friend's/fellow VMFer's Mustang to remind you what the end product looks like. If you don't know anyone who can give you a ride, the next best option is to just do a lot of reading/watching the stories of other people finishing their cars and getting out and enjoying them. That usually gets me motivated enough to get out there and turn some wrenches.

Now go get it done and keep us updated!

Ken
another good motivator is going to the local car show / cruise in. walk around and look at other peoples cars and you'll want to get yours done.
 

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These posts are motivation on a screen! In a sadistic way, it's comforting to hear the realities of building a classic Mustang, delays, hardships, moves...etc. I only recently got back in the game - 30 year hiatus to raise a family, career and all the bullsh_t that comes with life. I eased back into it by restoring old farm tractors 15 years ago. That taught me patience (Grass Hopper). I graduated back into this Mustang a few months ago thinking I was buying a "done" car. Nix that, the fantasy lasted a couple days - had to make mods & changes.... for every task I complete, I find two more, and three more...etc. For me, when I get frustrated, I step back and regroup. Doesn't always work but I'm still learning. What we do here is a gift and a privilege. At the end of the day or the end of a build, that satisfaction is explosive. They'll have to pry my 9/16 open-end wrench from my cold dead fingers - ha.
 

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I got discouraged plenty of times.
Discovering more rust than I thought, and having to remove even more metal, etc., etc., etc.
There was a time that I wanted to take a torch to it and cut it up and take it to the scrap metal dealer.
But I reasoned that the closer I got it to completion, the more money it was worth. So I kept pushing, little by little.
I continued to push, and over the last two years have completed enough so that now it is only one or two days away from being started after having not moved under its own power for over 38 years. :)
I've also never quit on anything in my life, and I was not going to break that record, no matter how painful.
 

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I've put the car on time out for a few months before. It can help you avoid just throwing parts at it when dealing with some bizarre issues. Also gives you time to ponder the problems.
 

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I spent about 7 years trying to get the carb right on my 67. It was running too rich and just could not get it right. I tried 3 different carbs, rebuilt them more than once. Swapped from the 4V back to the original 2V intake and carb and still could not get it right. Finally put the 4V intake back on and bought a new Summitt 500 CFM carb last month. OMG. Right out of the box with only a few minor tweaks and it runs great. No more dead dinosaur smell, no smoke, great throttle response, I can burn rubber again. Life is good again. My wife looks at me and says, we'll it only took you 7 years.

I now have 3 gently used carbs for sale. :D
 

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Bugs,

For me cars are a lot like houses, you never really are done.
Worse still, have a couple and you start swapping parts.
Or a better set of heads, suspension pieces, etc. hit the market and you just cannot resist.

If I did not have a business account to run most of my "redoes" through, I marriage would have never lasted these 43 years to be sure!
So enjoy the process. Some processes will go quickly and note a yield update, others will drag on and show little improvement to the average eye.
Do not let the stop and start get you down.
Enjoy the journey!

Hope this helps.
 

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I've got a list of smalls I need to get to but can't find any motivation. I got to pull out the interior to sound deaden, trim and fit the carpeting, install the console, some minor electrical, etc., etc. But everything is working good and I'm finally driving it again after 32 years.
 

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As I trudge slowly along I take lots and lots of pictures and do documentation of the things I've done and the things I purchased. When I get frustrated I look back at my pictures and I read some of my log and I think damn I'm fast!
 

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All. The. Time. It's even harder watching these car shows and seeing perfect products that come out, but nothing is really perfect and for the budget and skill level I'm on, it won't be near that. But that being said, I love my car and it's come a long way. The fun is fixing everything and making it better or my own.
 

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I designed and built the house I am living in. One end is made up of an early 1800s log cabin that I took apart and moved here. The day came that we had the foundation and subfloor ready for me to start reassembling the logs and we brought them to the site and lay them out. I remember looking out at all those logs scattered over half an acre, each with a numbered little yellow tag, and feeling totally overwhelmed and wondering what made me think I could do that. A LOT of money and convincing my wife had gotten me to that point.
SignCanDoIt.jpg

I have had several episodes like that with my Mustang, the latest just recently when looking at my new Coyote motor and the thought of squeezing it into my 65 engine bay and making it run. Stomach doing flip flops.
Each time though I have come through it a little stronger and more knowledgeable and will this time also.
 

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It took me 2 years to fix a broken motor mount. I pulled the engine and then it sat for awhile I eventually jumped back in and came out better then before. I managed to get the motor resealed and repainted, ceramic coated my headers, new oil pan to replace the oem with the lug nut welded to it. I got the toploader rebuilt by Dan Williams, painted the engine bay and got my steering hoses sorted out along with rerouting my wiring, fuel/ heater hoses and catch can more cleanly. I'm not worried about paint right now, having the car in primer makes me less scared to drive it.
 

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I had a big case of lost motivation when my dad died. After I got the 68 from him, I spent the next 8 years or so working on it and doing a rolling restoration. (It did not need any paint, just everything else.) I would take many pics and write many emails to dad to share in the restoration. Many phone calls to ask questions like when was the last time you changed the master cylinder. We'll dad died about a year or so before I figured I would finish it. I lost my mojo. The car sat in the garage untouched for a year. I had no one with which to share the experience. After a year, I decided it was time to get back to it and finish. It's what dad would have wanted. Here we are when we picked up the car from dad.
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