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Discussion Starter #1
Last week I posted about how I was having heat soak problems on my Autolite 2100. I removed the airhorn and the fuel bowl was nearly dry. I assume that was because the bowl was nearly dry, and it had to fill back up as well as wait for the fuel line to fill back up.I did a search as well as asked last week and came up with these solutions. What do you all think?
1) Insulate the steel fuel line from pump to carb.
2) Ensure that fuel is flowing well enough (Replace filter, check pump for flow, clean needle/seat)
3) Use a less oxygenated fuel (Does that mean lover octane? I can run 87 with no problems but usually "treat" my car to more)
4) Add a small amount of diesel fuel or MM oil to each tank of gas to decrease its volitility and increase it's boiling point.
5) Move from the aluminum spacer to a phenilic spacer, and add heat sheilds to the carb.

I plan on doing a combo of these options (actually 1-4). My car has only had the heat soak problem this month, in the hot July heat. I would run the car to operating temprature, and then park. When I came back between 20 minutes and 2 hours later, the car would be flooded and would be a hard start, and when it finally would start, it would shoot out a nice cloud of black smoke. Then, if I let it sit over night, it would fire right up, but then die and have to crank a moment to start up a second time.

Lastly, what should the curb idle speed be on a '68 289 2v? Fast idle speed? When the choke is on the gap between the plate and the body? Thanks!
 
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I wanted to avoid #5 because I want the engine to look original. I dunno though... I guess If i do keep driving the car, it would be a heck of a lot more beneficial. Where can I pick up one of those spacers? Mustang vendor catalogs?
 

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If you want the original look, you could always spray paint the sides of the spacer with grey paint or blue paint. Once it is bolted between the intake and carb, it would not stand out as much.
 

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Thinking back to high school physics, you'll remember that as you go to higher elevations, liquids boil at lower temperatures. I live at 8200 feet and am no stranger to heat-soak percolation. Not only will it empty your float bowl, but all that raw fuel that boils out runs into your intake, pooling, or worse yet, going into any cylinder that happens to be on the intake stroke.

Yes, lower-octane fuel typically contains fewer "oxygenates", which are the additives that the government (with a big push from the corn-alcohol lobby) demand they put in fuels today. And, as several others pointed out, nothing will do more good than a phenolic spacer to replace the aluminum one.
 

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for future reference you ma also want to tackle the heat under the hood as a whole.....and have your A/F ratio checked...

Also...do you have headers? cast iron intake? heads?
tell us more about your combo....

Flowmasters are also known to bring engine bay temps down a bit due to their ability to flow...

You may also want to think about thermal barrier coatings on the headers and intake... in order to keep the heat from bleeding up into the carb...doing just the headers can bring the engine bay temps down 100 degrees or more...

The MM oil idea is also a good one.....it actually improves mileage a bit too....I also use it on the motor oil....
 
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Also...do you have headers? cast iron intake? heads?
tell us more about your combo....
Stock exhuast manifolds, intake, cam, you name it, its stock. I have turboflow mufflers out back with an h-pipe. I plan on taking my car to the shop soon to have the carb and timing profesionnally adjusted. I always go by ear, but I dont know what i am listening for!
 
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