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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1970 D0oE Engine/ Heads. Can not tell if heads have been reworked.
Car ran great until I tore the top end off to find out what kind of cam and lifters it had. Discovered that every push rod was severely bent. Car ran strong, did not burn oil, but ran a little too rich and had a tendency to stall out unless I put the car in neutral.
I also discovered that the engine had been bored over .030 (as stamped on the TRW L-2249 piston tops). I pulled the cam, but I could not find any manufacturers identification. The only numbers stamped to the cam were "1206".
Here are my questions???
1. Do I need to pull the engine and tear out internals to eliminate possibility of metal shavings. (found none in oil pan)?
2. Do I need to determine all the crank measurements to determine which type of cam, lifters, rockers to install?
3. Are the TRW L-2249 pistons to high of a compression for this block.
4. What is the best combination of cam, lifters,rockers for this engine for street use and ability to drive long distance?
5. Best place to buy rebuilt engine should I need to get rid of this one?
 

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Those TRW L-2249 pistons are domed (pop-up) pistons. A quick google search on them reveals a lot of discussion about them, with people stating anywhere from 10.5-11.5:1 compression, depending on heads.

That is some serious compression for iron heads. I doubt you'll ever figure out what the cam is, though.
 

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..Car ran great until I tore the top end off to find out what kind of cam and lifters it had. Discovered that every push rod was severely bent. Car ran strong, did not burn oil, but ran a little too rich and had a tendency to stall out unless I put the car in neutral.
I must admit, I've never heard of an engine that "ran great & strong" with "every pushrod severely bent"....

I guess I haven't seen and heard it all yet. ;)
 

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The reason for bent pushrods is that the pushrods were too long. As the lifters rode up on the cam lobes to max lift, the valve retainers hit the valve guides and could not move any further. With solid lifters, there was nowhere for the rest of the lift to go but to bend the pushrods.

You would only get metal shavings from this if the cam lobes or the lifters wore irregularly. Check the cam lobes. If they're square at the edges, you didn't lose any metal from the cam. Check the lifters. If they're slightly convex, or even flat, you didn't lose any metal from the lifters. Anyway, if you've dropped the pan, you would see a gray film on the bottom if you had lost any appreciable amount of metal.

Crank measurements have nothing to do with the cam, other than I guess when you have such a big stroker crank that you have to use a reduced base circle cam to make it fit. I don't believe a typical 347 is that way, but I would ask around to make sure.

If your engine was not pinging and these are domed pistons, you should stick with the same level of cam as you have. Anything less will increase the effective compression ratio and cause ping. You can figure out the specs with a degree wheel and a dial indicator.
 

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It sounds like who ever put the rockers on, just tightened them all the way down, instead of setting the lash properly, It doesn't matter what cam was in it, because it's most likely smoked. I would not trash the engine just because of this. You need to call a cam company and tell them your set-up. They will recommend a good cam. If you don't know how to set up your cam and valve lash, find someone who does. It takes a matter of seconds to smoke a new cam. Good luck! P.S. Make sure you take a look at the cam bearings.
 

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Check the pushrod length. If you don't know how to measure for proper pushrod length, checkout some of the major cam sites. They have good instructions and anyone building and engine needs to know how to do this. I always measure and usually end up ordering custom length pushrods rods just to get everything right.

Oscar
 

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It sounds like who ever put the rockers on, just tightened them all the way down, instead of setting the lash properly, It doesn't matter what cam was in it, because it's most likely smoked. I would not trash the engine just because of this. You need to call a cam company and tell them your set-up. They will recommend a good cam. If you don't know how to set up your cam and valve lash, find someone who does. It takes a matter of seconds to smoke a new cam. Good luck! P.S. Make sure you take a look at the cam bearings.
If these heads are the DO0E heads then they are non adjustables and you torque them each down to the proper specs when both valves are closed in that cylinder. I have the same heads and i bought the CompCams conversion kit that converts them to adjustables. Bent pushrods are definitely caused by them being too long. Check the CraneCams website for a tech article on lifter preload, and also pushrod length . Hope this helps. I failed to check lifter preload on my freshly built 351w with a higher lift cam and i bent some pushrods and even wore the tips off of them. Lesson learned here :lol:
 

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What was involved in making them adjustable? They still have threaded studs don't they? The point I was trying to make was: When you stick in a after-market cam, you have to adjust your valve train properly. Not just torque them to factory settings. It is not a stock cam anymore! But I guess you figured this one out the hard way.
 

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What was involved in making them adjustable? They still have threaded studs don't they? The point I was trying to make was: When you stick in a after-market cam, you have to adjust your valve train properly. Not just torque them to factory settings. It is not a stock cam anymore! But I guess you figured this one out the hard way.
The kit was basically a thick washer that sat on the fulcrum (whatever that is called) and then a special nut. The nut is made to tighter clearances so it will hold without being torqued. Stock nuts will vibrate loose and will eventually fly off if not torqued. Non adjustable heads are not adjustable by using the zero lash method (twisting the pushrod). You adjust the valvetrain by getting longer or shorter pushrods. A combination of a valve job, higher strength springs, and a higher lift cam made the valvetrain geometry all out of whack.
 

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You are right about the original studs rockers and nuts being non-adjustable. Ford Motorsport used to sell correct length push rods for the 289/302 D0OE head combination. I have a set of these pushrods that I purchased over ten years ago but never use. An old Ford Motorsport Catalog should have the part number.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I pulled the engine, thouroughly inspected the underside and found no indication of metal shavings anywhere. I had put a large magnet in the oil catch pan and on the underside of the oil pan, no metal found at all. I took the heads to local speed shop and was told that these heads, as mentioned on this thread, are not made to withstand high compression. Mechanic said that he was surprised that the car had ran at all and that it wouldn't be long before I threw a valve through the engine. (not sure how that happens.
He said the heads are not worth rebuilding for this vehicle, and said that the cam was a solid cam. I will be bringing engine to him on Feb 20th. Assuming the bottom end checks out with him, he will make recomendations to match up the correct top end assembly.
Thinking if engine is lost to go with a 351 long block, if that will fit in 66 coupe with headers.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The reason for bent pushrods is that the pushrods were too long. As the lifters rode up on the cam lobes to max lift, the valve retainers hit the valve guides and could not move any further. With solid lifters, there was nowhere for the rest of the lift to go but to bend the pushrods.

You would only get metal shavings from this if the cam lobes or the lifters wore irregularly. Check the cam lobes. If they're square at the edges, you didn't lose any metal from the cam. Check the lifters. If they're slightly convex, or even flat, you didn't lose any metal from the lifters. Anyway, if you've dropped the pan, you would see a gray film on the bottom if you had lost any appreciable amount of metal.

Crank measurements have nothing to do with the cam, other than I guess when you have such a big stroker crank that you have to use a reduced base circle cam to make it fit. I don't believe a typical 347 is that way, but I would ask around to make sure.

If your engine was not pinging and these are domed pistons, you should stick with the same level of cam as you have. Anything less will increase the effective compression ratio and cause ping. You can figure out the specs with a degree wheel and a dial indicator.
I found absolutely no metal shavings in the oil pan, the catch basin, or the magnets placed in both. Piston are severely carboned and I could take a putty knife to the carbon to scrape it off. I have engine shop coming to pick up engine today. This shop is very reputable and I trust the owner not to feed me a lot of crap. If the crank and pistons checkout to be ok, then he will help me to design best components for street and highway use. I like having the torque and power, but I don't drag race and 11:1 compression might be a bit high for my needs.
 
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