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Hello all my name is Marvic and i am new to this forum group. I have a 1965 mustang fastback and today i started up after 3 months sitting in the garage, i noticed that the fuel pump was leaking fuel dripping from top but after like 2 minutes with the car on idle it stopped leaking. Any suggestions please? Or anybody had the same issue? I'm hoping that maybe because the car was sitting for a while and will be back to normal. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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You'll need to replace the pump. Cheap and easy. Just do it.
… and welcome to the Forum!
 
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If fuel is leaking out the vent hole, on top of the fuel pump, your rubber diaphragm inside is failing. Don't drive it until you put another fuel pump on it or you might be walking home. Underneath the rubber diaphragm is the fuel. Above the diagram if just an empty air space. If you see fuel coming out of that vent hole. There is no doubt that the diaphragm has failed, I see people on eBay advertising old NOS flathead and later Ford parts ford fuel pumps. Bad idea unless your just after the original casting. The rubber is going to be bad inside. Have it rebuilt, plus I bet rubber technology has come a long way since then.

If your going completely original and you think you might want to have the car judged for originality you want to find a pump with the correct casting numbers, for you car and even the correct build date on the casting if they had them? If you don't care about originality go buy an Airtex pump. We used Airtex pumps at work for 30-year's and they seemed to be pretty good. Check Rockauto for fuel pumps. You can compared the photos to yours. I prefer the early pumps with fuel filter canister on them. That is a wonderful fuel filter, pretty hard to plug one of those large filters up.

Installation. Glue the gasket to the pump and let it dry so it cannot slip out of place. I use Gasgacinch on just about everything I do. Its a contact cement.. You put it on the gasket and the pump. Let both pieces dry a couple of minutes until they are no longer wet, then stick the gasket to the pump. Its not going to move from that spot. The problem with Gasgacinch is it will last one year at the most and then it turns from a nice thin brushed on yellow liquid into a one-inch thick yellow rubber band. I think the part number is 440B. Buy the smallest can you can. Its up to you if you want to put Gasgacinch, silcone or nothing on the opposite side of the gasket. If the timing cover surface is nice, just use the Gasgacinch. It makes the gaskets come off easily later on. If its a brand new machined surface then I always the Gasgacinch. If somebody has put deep gouges in a part while they were scraping the gaskets off I prefer to use a little silicone so it can fill in those scratches. Little being the key word.

A lot of people want to use silicone on both sides of a gasket. Its a bad idea because it makes the gasket slippery and they slip out of place as you tighten the bolts. You always want to glue the gasket to the part with something that will not allow it move. Gasgacinch is good because in just a couple of minutes the gasket is not going anywhere. Its super good stuff for gluing transmission pan gaskets to the pan. Yet it will peel off nicely next time without have to wire wheel off a stuck on gasket. Its not the easiest stuff to find. You will find that professional mechanics know what it is and almost nobody else has ever heard of it. Most people have heard of Permatex contact glue. Its messy and the gaskets do not stick as good.

Installing the fuel pump. The fuel pump is actuated by an eccentric on the camshaft. If you try to install the pump with the eccentric in the position where it is wanting to push down on the fuel pump lever you will be fighting the levers spring inside the pump, while your trying to get the bolts in. Its a good way to end-up cross-threading the timing cover. Its better to rotate the engine until the eccentric is on the opposite side, where it does not push on the lever. That way the pump will slide in there nice and straight and you wont have any problems getting the bolts started.

Loosen the bolts on the old pump and then rotate the engine. You will feel when the cam is pushing on the fuel pump lever and when its not. Then remove the pump and you already have the cam in the correct position to install your new pump. You don't need to do this but it makes so much easier. Stick a little oil on the the fuel pump lever where it rides on the cam so its not starting off dry. If your have steel lines I always like to get them started before I finish tightening down the part. Being able to wiggle the part makes it easy to get that flared fitting started nice and straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If fuel is leaking out the vent hole, on top of the fuel pump, your rubber diaphragm inside is failing. Don't drive it until you put another fuel pump on it or you might be walking home. Underneath the rubber diaphragm is the fuel. Above the diagram if just an empty air space. If you see fuel coming out of that vent hole. There is no doubt that the diaphragm has failed, I see people on eBay advertising old NOS flathead and later Ford parts ford fuel pumps. Bad idea unless your just after the original casting. The rubber is going to be bad inside. Have it rebuilt, plus I bet rubber technology has come a long way since then.

If your going completely original and you think you might want to have the car judged for originality you want to find a pump with the correct casting numbers, for you car and even the correct build date on the casting if they had them? If you don't care about originality go buy an Airtex pump. We used Airtex pumps at work for 30-year's and they seemed to be pretty good. Check Rockauto for fuel pumps. You can compared the photos to yours. I prefer the early pumps with fuel filter canister on them. That is a wonderful fuel filter, pretty hard to plug one of those large filters up.

Installation. Glue the gasket to the pump and let it dry so it cannot slip out of place. I use Gasgacinch on just about everything I do. Its a contact cement.. You put it on the gasket and the pump. Let both pieces dry a couple of minutes until they are no longer wet, then stick the gasket to the pump. Its not going to move from that spot. The problem with Gasgacinch is it will last one year at the most and then it turns from a nice thin brushed on yellow liquid into a one-inch thick yellow rubber band. I think the part number is 440B. Buy the smallest can you can. Its up to you if you want to put Gasgacinch, silcone or nothing on the opposite side of the gasket. If the timing cover surface is nice, just use the Gasgacinch. It makes the gaskets come off easily later on. If its a brand new machined surface then I always the Gasgacinch. If somebody has put deep gouges in a part while they were scraping the gaskets off I prefer to use a little silicone so it can fill in those scratches. Little being the key word.

A lot of people want to use silicone on both sides of a gasket. Its a bad idea because it makes the gasket slippery and they slip out of place as you tighten the bolts. You always want to glue the gasket to the part with something that will not allow it move. Gasgacinch is good because in just a couple of minutes the gasket is not going anywhere. Its super good stuff for gluing transmission pan gaskets to the pan. Yet it will peel off nicely next time without have to wire wheel off a stuck on gasket. Its not the easiest stuff to find. You will find that professional mechanics know what it is and almost nobody else has ever heard of it. Most people have heard of Permatex contact glue. Its messy and the gaskets do not stick as good.

Installing the fuel pump. The fuel pump is actuated by an eccentric on the camshaft. If you try to install the pump with the eccentric in the position where it is wanting to push down on the fuel pump lever you will be fighting the levers spring inside the pump, while your trying to get the bolts in. Its a good way to end-up cross-threading the timing cover. Its better to rotate the engine until the eccentric is on the opposite side, where it does not push on the lever. That way the pump will slide in there nice and straight and you wont have any problems getting the bolts started.

Loosen the bolts on the old pump and then rotate the engine. You will feel when the cam is pushing on the fuel pump lever and when its not. Then remove the pump and you already have the cam in the correct position to install your new pump. You don't need to do this but it makes so much easier. Stick a little oil on the the fuel pump lever where it rides on the cam so its not starting off dry. If your have steel lines I always like to get them started before I finish tightening down the part. Being able to wiggle the part makes it easy to get that flared fitting started nice and straight.
thanks a lot very helpful. I will replace my pump but my question is, do I need to empty the gas from fuel?How do I stop the fuel when I remove the old pump? Thanks again
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In 1965 both the 6 cylinder and 8 cylinder engines used a fuel pump with an integral filter like this:
Yes that’s the one I was looking to buy. My question is do I need to empty the fuel from gas tank? Will fuel come out when I remove the old one? Thanks
 

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No, you will not have to drain the fuel from the tank. You will get fuel draining from the fuel line going to the carburetor from the pump, but it's not a whole lot.
 

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When you remove the rubber line from the pump, stick a golf tee or pencil in the end as a plug and keep it as high up as possible. After replacing the pump, but before starting the engine, pull the dipstick and sniff for fuel contamination of the oil. When the fuel pump diaphragms rupture they typically pump excess fuel directly into the crankcase.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When you remove the rubber line from the pump, stick a golf tee or pencil in the end as a plug and keep it as high up as possible. After replacing the pump, but before starting the engine, pull the dipstick and sniff for fuel contamination of the oil. When the fuel pump diaphragms rupture they typically pump excess fuel directly into the crankcase.
Thanks yes I heard that I might have to change oil now, that sucks because I changed oil 3 months ago before winter storage.
 
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