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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Currently, my 1969 mustang coupe 302 that has non power front disk brakes, and rear drums. Before i got the car, someone did a front disk brake conversion on it, so i am not sure which brand they went with. The calipers seem pretty ordinary (ill post a picture when i can).

My question is, i don't know if i want to go with power disk brakes or leave them manual. I plan on tracking the car (haven't had any track time yet though, cars not ready. Also talking circuit tracks, not drag), and i am eventually going to get rear disk brakes as well.

Also, which brand would you go with? What kind of rotors, calipers, etc.

I know this is a lot of information, but i want to make sure i get everything right.

Thanks guys!
 

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I tend to prefer manual brakes, especially on a car that will go on the track. Much better pedal feel. A correctly setup system won't require massive leg strength to stop your car.

Heat will be your biggest enemy on the track, especially where you live. Thunderhill and Laguna Seca are hard on brakes, Sears Point, not as much. Rotor size/mass and thickness are all important, so is good fresh fluid and pad compound.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yea, i figured manual brakes are the way go.


Is it true that the the bigger the rotors are, the more drag the car has?
 

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Manual brakes are best on the track.If you run power brakes you had better have a lot of vacuum all the time, you sometimes will need to use the brakes in rapid succession. So then you need to get a cam that makes good vacuum, not a good choice for the track. I just got done installing a Street or Track rear disc conversion on my '67, it was a piece of cake. Everything I needed to do the job and it didn't take much time. Have yet to get the car out but from the looks of the installed product, it will stop just fine. I highly recommend them!
 

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Yea, i figured manual brakes are the way go.


Is it true that the the bigger the rotors are, the more drag the car has?
Not sure what you mean by this. Typically larger rotors weigh more than smaller ones if thats what you mean (unless you go with a 2-piece rotor with aluminum hat).

As a general rule, go with the largest rotor you can get inside the wheel. Larger heat sink and better mechanical advantage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I heard somewhere that the bigger your rotors are, it will actually slow the car down (not during braking). I thought it was a little weird, haha

How about slotted vs. drilled? Is there a difference between them? Do you want a combination of the 2? Neither?
 

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I heard somewhere that the bigger your rotors are, it will actually slow the car down (not during braking). I thought it was a little weird, haha

How about slotted vs. drilled? Is there a difference between them? Do you want a combination of the 2? Neither?

Many people feel in a drag race car, a heavier flywheel is the way to go. More mass, more inertia to get the car out of the hole quicker. But an article I read a few years ago did back to back drag strip testing on the same car with a heavy and a light flywheel and found the light flywheel was the quicker of the two because it took less energy to accelerate after each shift because there was less mass. I suppose maybe the same could apply to brake rotors. Perhaps the road race guys could comment
 

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Many people feel in a drag race car, a heavier flywheel is the way to go. More mass, more inertia to get the car out of the hole quicker. But an article I read a few years ago did back to back drag strip testing on the same car with a heavy and a light flywheel and found the light flywheel was the quicker of the two because it took less energy to accelerate after each shift because there was less mass. I suppose maybe the same could apply to brake rotors. Perhaps the road race guys could comment
Well weight is always the enemy. You want enough mass so your brakes don't cook but not too much due to the extra weight. This is for all out racing where every pound counts.
 

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Shaun,

Since your the vendor responding, where do you think the trade off is in your brake packages? T/A kit versus big rotor kit on a car say in the build level of your coupe? I personally would like the option of running 15's on occassion. Just love the look of a Hoosier/Blue Streak on these coupes though will run 17's most of time for lower cost/lap, but don't want to leave TOO much on table for those rare occassions if so.

T/A brake kit with your after market rotors vs. Pure aftermarket similarly priced big rotor kit. I'm asking this specific to our Mustangs as they are tire limited and nose heavy (relative to my other car addiction who are hard to beat in the brake zone)
 

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Hi Kenny,

First off, you should try to come up to Thunderhill the first weekend in April: the NorCal Shelby Club is holding the "Spring Sprint" open track and that's the best place to see different setups and talk to the drivers to see what they like. I'll be up there with my brother-in-law: if you make it up there, look for us - he red 66 coupe is number 613.

I've had two different sets of disc brakes on my 67 Coupe. First was a Wilwood setup from the late 1990's that I was never really happy with (their kits are much better now - my setup was an early attempt for them). I recently switched to the Trans Am kit from Street or Track. Disclaimer: Shaun, the owner of Street or Track, and I are old friends - just want that out in the open even though I always give honest feedback. I'm having an issue with knock-back on my rear end (an old problem for me), but was really impressed with the stopping power of my new setup. The kit comes with everything you need and Shaun always uses high quality components. Because of the issue with my rear, I haven't had a chance to really put them through the paces, but they already outperformed my old setup. The rotors in this kit are massive (12 x 1.25) , compared to my old Wilwoods - they were 11 x .83 inches and I would regularly overheat them at Thunderhill).

Personally, I have no interest in slotting or cross-drilling: looks cool, but I don't believe there's a benefit any longer (new pad materials alleviated problem of outgassing) and have heard that it can chew up pads quicker.

One important consideration is what size wheels you will be running: if you are going with 17 inch wheels, you have many more choices because you won't be limited to smaller rotors. The Trans Am kit does cost more than some other setups, but you can run it under 15 inch wheels (hard for me to believe they'll squeeze in, but Shaun has at least one customer who runs the setup in Vintage racing in Europe and he has to run 15 inch wheels).

Baer makes great kits for our cars and Street or Track has several "flavors" of kits that are great deals. Shaun is really good at giving honest recommendations based on what your intentions are - he's a former NorCal Shelby club member and tests most of his setups himself.

Hope to see you at Spring Sprint!

Lance
 

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Shaun,

Since your the vendor responding, where do you think the trade off is in your brake packages? T/A kit versus big rotor kit on a car say in the build level of your coupe? I personally would like the option of running 15's on occassion. Just love the look of a Hoosier/Blue Streak on these coupes though will run 17's most of time for lower cost/lap, but don't want to leave TOO much on table for those rare occassions if so.

T/A brake kit with your after market rotors vs. Pure aftermarket similarly priced big rotor kit. I'm asking this specific to our Mustangs as they are tire limited and nose heavy (relative to my other car addiction who are hard to beat in the brake zone)
Luke,

Are you going to Columbus next month? I am. I've Pm'd you my #, would be easier to explain over the phone.
 
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