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So I am gonna start my project, I have a mustang 1965 and I'm gonna do a 2jz swap. If I could get any help to make it easier. Doesn't really have to be specific to a 2jz swap, just in general to do a swap on a older classic with another make of engine. I'd appreciate the help. Another thing I'm doing this by myself with help of some close friends and family. And I'm saving up by myself, but ill get there.
 

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If you're struggling to start, I'd take a stroll through the build forum. IMO the engine swap is going to be one of the last things addressed. Does the car currently run? If so leave the motor in it until you save the money for your swap, the last thing you want is a shell of a car sitting for years until you get the to do your build (don't ask how I know). Get the body work done, then move on to the suspension. Is the car a factory v8 car? If not you'll need a stronger rear axle and I would upgrade to v8 front suspension as well.

These swaps are rare in the vintage mustang world but it has been done. Read this build https://forums.vintage-mustang.com/build-forum/611035-beau-s-68-coupe.html he does the swap and IIRC it wasnt all roses.
 

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Before you start down this road, look at what you intend to accomplish. What is it that you intend? Improvement? Weirdness? "modern-ness"?

Then look at what engines will meet your performance goals, along with the other ideas you have.

I'm actually a big fan of the 2JZ, and I've owned more than one MR2, which I also loved. However, the 3 liter inline has some disadvantages. It has a taller center of gravity than the smallblock Windsors, and due to its smaller displacement, it will never have the crisp, instant torque delivery of a V8. Instead, you get a more gradual application of power as the turbos wind up. It's a more 'European' solution, I suppose. But it does take away from many of the aspects of a classic musclecar that make it fun to drive. This would also be true of most 6 and 4 cylinder 'modern' engines that deliver decent horsepower.

The low-stressed, higher-displacement Ford engines offer a lot more long-term reliability in comparison with turbocharging. Coked-up oil ash in the bearings, ultra-hot exhaust, and high under-hood temps do not lend themselves well to longevity.

Even if you modify things to fit it in, you'll have a ton of work to deal with. These cars work really well with high torque but modest horsepower. Cranking the horsepower up to 11 means you'll need to spend a lot of time working on the chassis and handling to make it safer, but that's also true with hot-rodded V8's.

If you truly want a sports car with the characteristics of a small displacement turbocharged sports car, you might consider starting with one of those, instead of carving away the aspects of a Mustang that make it so unique and different in the first place.

But if you have a clear vision, and the drive to follow your dreams, you do what you need to, with your own car.

Best wishes!
 

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Why a 2JZ? Do you have one sitting around? They are a great engine...but realistically speaking they only make 280HP from the factory....so does a K-code 289 and it came from the factory in vintage mustangs. If you are doing it for max power potential...you can make crazy amounts of power through engines that bolt in. If you want a better I6 than came from the factory, there are more modern options than the 2JZ that are also cheaper(The Chevrolet Atlas I6 for instance is all aluminum, makes 280HP from the factory without a turbo, has max power potential of over 1200HP, etc). I like 2JZ engines...they are a good option...but they only make sense if A: You already have one sitting around, or B: You hang out with an import crowd that you feel you want to impress.

If I were to swap in a DOHC I6 engine, my choices would be the following order:

1. Chevy Atlas 4.2L I6 (Colorado, Hummer H2, etc). It gets the #1 spot because its easy to find parts for domestically and cheap to buy as well being a modern I6
2. The Australian Ford Falcon BA 4.1L I6...this option is also more modern than the 2JZ and wins for the coolest I6 swap because its a direct descendant of the 60s Ford Falcon I6 engine...available 250HP NA or 400+ turbocharged from the Falcon Xr6
3. The 2JZ 3.0L I6...it makes #3 because of its reputation for reliability and fuel efficiency and not much else
4. The RB26...normally this would beat out the 2JZ, but its physical size is on a par with the first 2 without the advantages those offer
5. A Jaguar I6....this makes the list just because Jaguar makes some very visually pleasing engines
 

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Being limited on time and money, I spent literally years upgrading the chassis and repairing bodywork on my six cylinder '67 in preparation fro upgrading to a bigger engine. Then came the day, pulled the six out and put a ready 5.0 in. In one weekend. A couple of months later I changed my mind and almost an entire weekend swapping the 5.0 out for the larger 5.8. Years of prep work and then an engine in a couple of days is my point here. If your car has the usual rust in the floorboards and such, a light duty rear axle and drum brakes all the way around you've got a LOT of work to do before you even really need to start worrying about an engine of any kind.
Huge amounts of turbo power are fun but you kind of need to stop, turn corners, and not be shedding rusty bits of car wherever you go. All that said, show us what you're starting out with and the comments will be more on point. Granny's rusty old abandoned six cylinder and a full roll caged retired road racer would be VERY different projects.
 
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