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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I just joined this forum and I am hoping I can find some help with some problems I have been having with a 1965 Mustang.

It’s a ‘C’ engine code with a 289 V8 engine, a 2100 2bbl carburetor and an automatic transmission.

The car was running but had a few things that were odd which I already listed on my introductory post.

I am going to try to stick to what is pertinent to my question.

I replaced the spark plugs and gapped them at .035”, restored the throttle linkage with a kit from CJ Ponny, rebuilt the 2100 carburetor, there was already a Pertronix Ignitor I and I installed a Flamethrower 40011 coil (40,000 V & 1.5 Ohm) and removed an external ballast resistor that the PO has installed (per Perrronix instructions) and installed a relay from Pertronix so I wouldn’t have to deal with the pink ballast resistor under the dash.

The problem I am having is that my vacuum reading seems too high and it is also fluctuating between 19 and 20 in Hg.

And I can also hear a bit of a ‘hiss’ sound, almost as if there was a vacuum leak although if there was, my reading would be lower right?

The vacuum gauge is connected to the port coming from the the back of the carburetor spacer (with the PCV removed). And I have a tachometer and a timing light connected as well for the test.

When I originally hooked everything up, I noticed that the timing was set at 12 BTDC. I have read that some people like to advance it that much but the standard for an engine and model this year I know is 6 BTDC. What I do not know for sure is if by having a Pertronix Ignitor and a 40,000v flamethrower coul, are you actually supposed to advance the timing?

I did actually set it at 6 BTDC and for a brief moment the vacuum was close to being steady, very very minimal fluctuation although still high. But after a little while and as the engine was getting warmer it started fluctuating between 19 and 20 in Hg again.

I know the standard is supposed to be around 17-18in Hg, correct?

I attached a quick video showing my readings:

https://youtu.be/oQ_Tfs5K8I4

I played with the idle mixture screws but I am not very good with adjusting those. It seemed that by messing with them I could lower the vacuum but then the engine was running like crap.

Any tips or advice on how to properly address this issue?

Thank you so much!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I forgot to mention that actually the vacuum reading when the timing was at 12 BTDC was even a bit higher, fluctuating around 20-21.

Once I brougt it to 6 BTDC then it lowered by 1 in Hg but is still fluctuating.

Also, I am not sure if it’s important but the spark plugs are NGK iridium.

Thanks again!
 

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Not sure where you got the idea that 18" - 20" vacuum is "too much" for a well tuned engine. Keep in mind that for power brakes the factory boosters need a minimum of 13" of vacuum with the transmission in "Drive" to function properly.

One school of thought is to adjust distributor and carb to highest vacuum reading then test drive the car under load. If it pings, back off the distributor a degree or two and test again. Continue until the engine does not ping under load and that is the sweet spot for your engine.

It goes without saying that vacuum leaks should be found and fixed.
 

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Not so concerned about your vac readings, but I would look into the noise it's making!....sounds mechanical to me, and NOT good....lifters, etc???
 

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Tapping noise is paramount..... compared to idle. No such thing as too high a vacuum reading. It’s a balancing act between idle mixture screws and idle speed screw on the carb. Look into the tapping.....
Idle speed may be a little low too.
It’ll probably work out as you’re fooling with everything else..... including the tapping.
 

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Tapping noise is paramount..... compared to idle. No such thing as too high a vacuum reading. It’s a balancing act between idle mixture screws and idle speed screw on the carb. Look into the tapping.....
Idle speed may be a little low too.
It’ll probably work out as you’re fooling with everything else..... including the tapping.
I agree, no such thing as "too high" vacuum.

The tapping sound may be misaligned rockers, this was a problem on 63-66 smallblocks.

If you merely have noisy tappets, do this-

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Do this, and it will run smoothly, and likely with more power:


Disconnect the coil + wire.

Attach a bump switch to the solenoid, or just use a screwdriver.

Turn the engine so the #1 intake valve is fully opened. Loosen the exhaust valve until you can move the #1 exhaust valve pushrod up and down (NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.


Note: Spinning the pushrod can cause a false adjustment, as a slowly collapsing lifter can allow the pushrod to spin freely, thus throwing off the base line of your adjustment.

Turn the engine so the #1 exhaust valve is fully opened. Loosen the intake valve until you can move the #1 intake valve pushrod up and down (again, NOT spinning).
Tighten this valve until no up and down movement can be felt, then tighten an additional 3/4 turn.

Repeat for the other 7 cylinders.

I did this on a friend’s engine that had been adjusted when built, then driven for several years. It was running OK, but not great, you could hear some valve noise. After doing the above, it did not seem to be much better immediately after adjustment, mostly because the lifters had been varnished into position by years of driving. Coupla miles around the block, though, and it was a whole 'nother engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Wow thank you so much guys for all the responses! And thank you for pointing out the noise, to be honest I had no reference about the sound. I always thought that was normal but now that you mentioned it I really have to take care of it. Thank you 22GT for the procedure, I will try to see if I can do it myself, its a little scary to mess with rockers and valves since I have never done it before but its definetively worth trying.

I will report the results! Thanks again!
 

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If you follow 22GT's advice you won't go wrong :)

Agree that high vacuum is actually a good thing. For a bone stock motor 20" sounds about right.

Modern gasoline blends seem to take kindly to more advanced timing, so probably put it back at 12 if it likes to run there. Mess with it enough and you will get to where you can hear where the motor is "happy" - vacuum will peak and everything will smooth out nicely. My motor (with a biggish cam) prefers somewhere around 16-18*BTDC initial and runs like piss with 12*. I've found that timing is best done when you use the factory setting as a starting point, then throw that out the window and put it wherever the engine is happiest.
 

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".......for a brief moment the vacuum was close to being steady, very very minimal fluctuation although still high. But after a little while and as the engine was getting warmer it started fluctuating between 19 and 20 in Hg again.

I know the standard is supposed to be around 17-18in Hg, correct?......."
you've already heard the good news, vacuum not too high. And the bad news, lifters making too much noise.

So I've just got a couple of quick questions for you:

1) where did you read it, or who told you, that the vacuum had to be 17-18" ?

2) do you have a Ford published shop manual ? If not that should be your next move, having a genuine Ford shop manual (not theClymer or Haynes manuals) will SAVE you so much time and money, that's it's hard to imagine owning a classic car without one.

amazon has them, as well as the usual Mustang vendors:


https://www.amazon.com/Comet-Falcon-Fairlane-Mustang-Manual/dp/0967321123/ref=sr_1_1?crid=X651OSPMF0K0&keywords=1965+ford+mustang+shop+manual&qid=1552471226&replacementKeywords=shop+manual&s=gateway&sprefix=1965+Ford+Mustang+Shop,aps,176&sr=8-1&vehicle=1965-54-688------------&vehicleName=1965+Ford+Mustang

this link is for the CD version. I prefer the hardcopy, which you can find if you look around.

Z

be sure to keep a NEW set of points and a condenser in the car at all times, and a flashlight. One cannot choose when and where the Pertronix ignition will go belly up.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I made this video right before replacing the valve cover gaskets which I probably should have shown you earlier. Some of the rocker arms were a bit loose, I asked a friend and he told me that was normal but I am not that knowledgeable in this area so I trusted him and replaced the gasket and kept on with the tune up.

I don’t know if it has anything to do with the tapping noise but I thought it would be worth showing you.

https://youtu.be/KGArkf1SHL4

Also, mention that I used Pennzoil 10W-40 conventional when replacing the oil.

And the fact that the car had been sitting for quite some time, around 4 months. It’s not been driven very often, only once or twice a month and sometimes it spends quite some time without being driven like this last time.

I should have recorded a video before doing any of this to compare the sound, that’s my fault. To be honest I can not remember if the tapping noise was there before and I could have perfectly shoved some dirt inside the engine while removing the old gasket material as well, I was being very careful but anything can happen.

Or maybe the lifters and passages were dirty already and because it was sitting for so long the oil passages were clogged?

This is why I was thinking of asking, would putting a cleaning additive like the Liqui Moly Engine Flush to the oil be worth doing before proceeding with what @22GT is suggesting?

Also, someone mentioned that the RPM feels too low, but the stock settings call for 500 RPM for idle on a 1965 289 V8 engine with A/T, is that incorrect?

Thanks again!
 

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I made this video right before replacing the valve cover gaskets which I probably should have shown you earlier. Some of the rocker arms were a bit loose, I asked a friend and he told me that was normal but I am not that knowledgeable in this area so I trusted him and replaced the gasket and kept on with the tune up.

I don’t know if it has anything to do with the tapping noise but I thought it would be worth showing you.

https://youtu.be/KGArkf1SHL4

Also, mention that I used Pennzoil 10W-40 conventional when replacing the oil.

And the fact that the car had been sitting for quite some time, around 4 months. It’s not been driven very often, only once or twice a month and sometimes it spends quite some time without being driven like this last time.

I should have recorded a video before doing any of this to compare the sound, that’s my fault. To be honest I can not remember if the tapping noise was there before and I could have perfectly shoved some dirt inside the engine while removing the old gasket material as well, I was being very careful but anything can happen.

Or maybe the lifters and passages were dirty already and because it was sitting for so long the oil passages were clogged?

This is why I was thinking of asking, would putting a cleaning additive like the Liqui Moly Engine Flush to the oil be worth doing before proceeding with what @22GT is suggesting?

Also, someone mentioned that the RPM feels too low, but the stock settings call for 500 RPM for idle on a 1965 289 V8 engine with A/T, is that incorrect?

Thanks again!
- Your rockers appear perfectly normal.

- The tops of your cylinder heads are very clean. That's a good sign the engine has been properly maintained with regular oil changes. Most older engines will have lots of gunk in that area from not changing the oil.

- Adjust the rockers as described by 22GT and report back. I would not recommend adding anything to your oil.

- Nothing wrong with Penzoil 10W-40. However, it's a good idea to run an oil with higher zinc with a flat tappet cam such as yours. There are many options. You can find Valvoline VR1 on the shelf at your local O'Reilly Auto Parts which makes it convenient as well as a good choice for a high zinc oil. Many of the high-zinc oils are hard to find and you have to mail-order and pay shipping which I don't like doing.
 

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Hard to say if its a lifter or rocker noise but its such a sharp noise I'd guess rocker which of course can be caused by a lifter:nerd:
I've had success from flushes before and LiquiMoly is a trusted brand. If you're lucky you can hear it quieten down within a few minutes. Do it, change the oil before thinking about adjusting anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
well that explain the poor information. It's a dead giveaway when they list the engine vacuum (and spark plugs) as being the same for all the 289's, even the K code too. Wrong.

Z
Will I be able to find all the correct settings at the Shop Manual? The shop manual I have for my 78 Bronco is very detailed but does not cover calibration settings.


- Your rockers appear perfectly normal.

- The tops of your cylinder heads are very clean. That's a good sign the engine has been properly maintained with regular oil changes. Most older engines will have lots of gunk in that area from not changing the oil.

- Adjust the rockers as described by 22GT and report back. I would not recommend adding anything to your oil.

- Nothing wrong with Penzoil 10W-40. However, it's a good idea to run an oil with higher zinc with a flat tappet cam such as yours. There are many options. You can find Valvoline VR1 on the shelf at your local O'Reilly Auto Parts which makes it convenient as well as a good choice for a high zinc oil. Many of the high-zinc oils are hard to find and you have to mail-order and pay shipping which I don't like doing.
Good to hear that the rockers are normal, another less thing to worry about. I will proceed then with what 22GT suggested.

About the the oil, if I were to use that Valvoline VR1 which viscosity do you recommend? They don’t seem to have 10w-40. Or I guess I could stick with the Pennzoil 10w-40 with a zinc additive, which is what I use on my Bronco.

Thank you so much again for all the responses!
 

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Also, someone mentioned that the RPM feels too low, but the stock settings call for 500 RPM for idle on a 1965 289 V8 engine with A/T, is that incorrect?

That seems to be about right...assuming you had the car in drive and someone holding the brake. If it is an AC car , that should be running as well - admittedly, I didn't watch the video because I would have been no help with the tapping sound.
 

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Hey guys, I am happy to inform that I successfully adjusted the valves. I wanted to make sure I didn't screw up and ended up rotating the engine manually. It took quite some time but with some patience I got it done.

I even put some tape with measurements around the harmonic balancer to see where I was for each adjustment, but honestly, I ended up not paying much attention to that as I was more focused on seeing the valves go up and down.




I also taped each valve as I was getting it done, I know a little silly but it was my first time and I wanted to make sure I didn't forget any.



Here are a couple of videos, one right after the adjustment. The valves were very noisy, and that scared me:


But then I remembered someone said that was normal and to drive it for a little bit so I did that and then the noise disappeared:


I also set back the timing at 12 BTDC (I had moved it at 6, it was at 12 before), and the vacuum reading is excellent now. So I would call this a success!

Thank you so much for all the help!

Now I have another problem which I am going to post on another thread. It is regarding leaks on my C4, especially the linkage and encountered a weird Mickey Mouse job the PO did. Check the forum for my post.
 
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