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Hi there! I'm a lover of vintage Fords. My wife and I used to own quite a fleet (a 1966 Mustang, a 1968 Mustang, a 1960 Ford Thunderbird, and 1963, 1965, 1966, 1967, and 1970 Ford Galaxies). Alas, we've had to sell them all, and we miss them very, very much.

I could use the forum's help to identify a vintage Mustang in a photograph on which I'm basing a story I'm writing. I was going to insert the photograph, but I don't know how to give it its own URL, so I'm including it as an attachment. My gut tells me its a 1970 Fastback, but I'd feel better if folks much more in the know advised me.

As much detail about the car as you fine folks can provide me, I sure would appreciate it. Thanks in advance!

Talk soon, Kerry
 

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I'm not the best authority, but I believe that is a '68 fastback. Notice the louvers behind the door along the roofline, and the "C" indentation on the rear quarter.

1968 Mustang fastback

1970 Mustang fastback
 

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You could get away with calling it a 67 or 68. The quarter ornament appears 68 but photo may have been altered. It shows no 68 rear side marker, but that could have been removed too. It is definitely one or the other, no possible others.
 

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Thanks so much, everyone! Man, does this help. Please reply with your opinion of the following scenario:

A fifteen-year-old kid buys this '68 Fastback as a junker out of a junkyard and spend the next three years and every penny restoring it to the condition as depicted in the above attached photograph.

Does that sound believable? Do you think an everyday, middle-class, red-blooded teenager would have the wherewithal to pull this scenario off? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Also, what details about the car can I pepper the story with? Here's a line I've already thrown into the story:

"5.0L, 302Cu. In., V8, naturally-aspirated.”

Does any of that sound right?

Thanks so much. You guys are great! Talk soon, Kerry

 

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Thanks so much, everyone! Man, does this help. Please reply with your opinion of the following scenario:

A fifteen-year-old kid buys this '68 Fastback as a junker out of a junkyard and spend the next three years and every penny restoring it to the condition as depicted in the above attached photograph.

Does that sound believable? Do you think an everyday, middle-class, red-blooded teenager would have the wherewithal to pull this scenario off? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Also, what details about the car can I pepper the story with? Here's a line I've already thrown into the story:

"5.0L, 302Cu. In., V8, naturally-aspirated.”

Does any of that sound right?

Thanks so much. You guys are great! Talk soon, Kerry

Just say 302, and maybe add 4bbl. to that. Drop the rest. :yoho:

Also, good for you doing some background research. Always, always write about what you know. The goal is to have things credible to readers that do know. Started reading a novel years ago, I think by Sidney Sheldon. He had a toddler slalom water skiing. Zero credibility, tossed the book, and wouldn't bother to read anything by him again no matter what the New York Times might say.
 

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The two items that would differentiate a 67 from a 68 are the rear reflector, and the trim inside the "C" behind the door. I zoomed in, and neither is clear enough to be 100% sure. But the almost certain lack of the reflector would make it a 67. 302-4V would be period correct.

Best
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, 4ocious! You're the best. Any thoughts on that scenario of a 15-year-old finding a junker for $800 and, within a few years, restoring it? Talk soon, Kerry
 

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Thanks, 4ocious! You're the best. Any thoughts on that scenario of a 15-year-old finding a junker for $800 and, within a few years, restoring it? Talk soon, Kerry
The character would need funding from somewhere (inheritance or trust access, family bucks?), a unique or special reason to do so, and at least one Mr. Miyagi type mentor, even if from afar.
 

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I love it! Thanks. All of that gives me some great ideas of where to take the story. With regard to the unique or special reason, I see Dave as simply having been bitten by the vintage-car bug (you and I both know, once bitten, hooked for life!). Thanks again. Talk soon, Kerry
 

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Also, good for you doing some background research. Always, always write about what you know. The goal is to have things credible to readers that do know. Started reading a novel years ago, I think by Sidney Sheldon. He had a toddler slalom water skiing. Zero credibility, tossed the book, and wouldn't bother to read anything by him again no matter what the New York Times might say.
Precisely!! I like the way you put that: "zero credibility". In writing circles, we call that "kicking the reader out of the story". Basically, if we as writers don't believe in the world in which we're writing, why should our readers? That's why I love these forums, because they are such a great way to get these little details right. (Also, I get to talk with great folks such as you.)

I appreciate the feedback. That means a lot. Talk soon, Kerry
 

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I think $8000 not $800 would be more believable. I don't think you can buy a rolling 67/68 fastback for anywhere close to $800. Also I don't believe you would find one in a junkyard. Most junkyards have cleared out of their 60's model stuff or at least the ones I've been to lately have. Anyways that's just my perspective.

david
 

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I think $8000 not $800 would be more believable. I don't think you can buy a rolling 67/68 fastback for anywhere close to $800. Also I don't believe you would find one in a junkyard. Most junkyards have cleared out of their 60's model stuff or at least the ones I've been to lately have. Anyways that's just my perspective.

david
Days of $800 67-68 mustangs are Gone in 60 seconds. The Eleanor mustang has made these years very collectable.
 

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Just wanted to mention 68 was the first year for the 302, 67 came from the factory with a 289. An engine from a junkyard to swap in would most likely be a 5.0 liter. All basically the same engine externally, biggest difference being if the car had the stock engine, or if he got one to swap in. 4bbl carb still appropriate in all cases.
 

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The OP did not state in what setting her novel takes place, which for all we know could be 1979 and Intercourse, Pennsylvania. I've been to that neck of the woods. Paradise isn't all it's cracked up to be, Virginville is really hard to find these days, Bird-In-Hand isn't as nice as Two-In-Bush, and Blue Ball? I just can't go there.
 

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A fifteen-year-old kid buys this '68 Fastback as a junker out of a junkyard and spend the next three years and every penny restoring it to the condition as depicted in the above attached photograph.

Does that sound believable? Do you think an everyday, middle-class, red-blooded teenager would have the wherewithal to pull this scenario off? I'd love to hear your thoughts.

Also, what details about the car can I pepper the story with? Here's a line I've already thrown into the story:

"5.0L, 302Cu. In., V8, naturally-aspirated.”

Does any of that sound right?
Well, we were 17, but myself and several friends did exactly that, except one of the cars was a 67 Cougar instead of a Mustang. And it didn't take us three years. Three months was closer to it. We needed wheels.

The only 302 in 68 was the J code 302 4V, the rest of the SBF 68's were 289, 2V of course. There was no such thing as a "5.0" then.
 
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