Vintage Mustang Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I did a search before I posted. I am picking up a 66 nut and bolt restored convert. The guy has 20K in the car. And it shows. Metallic Blue with white pony interior white convert top. Bought it from the son. Dad died 3 years ago. The son doesn't know much about the car. I am not sure about the engine. My question is how can I tell a 289 from a 302? The engine is in the car and running.

I am picking the car up Sunday morning. Would be nice to know if it is a 289 or 302.

Thanks for the info.

Tom ::
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
The only real way to know is measure the stroke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
I'm sure there's casting numbers somewhere on the block. I know they're on the heads for sure but that doesn't tell you much since they are pretty much interchangeable anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,670 Posts
See if you can find the build date on the block. The last year for the 289 was 1968. That was also the first year for the 302.I am not sure were the date on the block is located but a search may help you. Also check the part number on the block. If it is c9 or later it is not a 289.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Yep the numbers would be the only reasonable way to tell, either way they are the same engine, just a slight more stroke on the 302.
 

·
Registered
71 Mach1, Mcode, AOD, 4 wheel discs, Ram air, Cragars in Vermilion Fire paint.
Joined
·
967 Posts
I thought I the firing order was different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,091 Posts
All the previous reply's assume the block was not replaced at some point. The only definitive way to know what rotating assembly is in the block is to remove the oilpan and look at the crank and rods. 1M crank, C3AE rods - 289, 2M crank, C8OE rods - 302. Unfortunately, this is not practical in your circumstance.
You can also locate some circumstantial evidence quickly without removing more than the air cleaner: On the carb toe, driver's front the number should be C6xx, Same on the distributor and intake.
 

·
Gone but never forgetten
Joined
·
25,239 Posts
Another quick way of identifying most 302's is by looking at the pad behind the intake. A 289 will have a valley there, where as most 302's will not only be flat, but have a partial VIN of the car it came from, although some early 302's (circa 1968) may not have the partial VIN.
 

·
Gone but never forgetten
Joined
·
25,239 Posts
The firing order didn't change until the introductin of the 5.0L. The firing order, though, is dependant on the cam. You can put a 351w cam into a 289 and run the later firing order, therefore, it's not a good way of telling the kind of block that's in the car (only the kind of cam).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,061 Posts
All the previous reply's assume the block was not replaced at some point. The only definitive way to know what rotating assembly is in the block is to remove the oilpan and look at the crank and rods. 1M crank, C3AE rods - 289, 2M crank, C8OE rods - 302. Unfortunately, this is not practical in your circumstance.
You can also locate some circumstantial evidence quickly without removing more than the air cleaner: On the carb toe, driver's front the number should be C6xx, Same on the distributor and intake.
Bingo! I just pulled the oil pan off a "302" with a block dated from 9/1970. It has a 1M crank and C3OE rods, making it a 289 +0.030. It was a mass rebuild for a 1966 289 replacement block. The mechanic (and the owner) were sure it was a 302, mostly from the block casting numbers.
Daniel
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top