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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a brand new Mustang owner. I just bought a '65 coupe that I want to build as a GT with the HIPO engine. The seller told me to start off with an unmolested, good 289 block. I've looked on eBay, but pickings are slim. Any suggestions where I can find a good block at a reasonable price ??
 

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You need to fill out your Bio so we know where you are. I have a 289 block at my brother's house in Fresno. I don't know if it's been bored already or not. About all I know is it was running when I pulled it many years ago.
 

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Just get a new one from summit, jegs, or PAW. Might as well start totally fresh.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I like the suggestion, but I'm not familiar with any of the names mentioned. What are their website URL's or contact information ??
 

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I'm in wa state and can get you a good block for about 250.00 coded to a 65. ::
 

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I would try Dennis at DSC Motorsport. He specializes in hard to find Ford stuff, blocks, heads, cranks, etc. Check out their web site, DSC Motorsport.
 

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You can build a late-model roller engine that will romp over a GT engine. HIPO heads barely flow better than standard heads. HIPO exhaust manifolds are as restrictive as standard exhaust manifolds. Sixties technology does not compare to modern stuff.

If the 65 has a 5-bolt bellhousing the options are limited. My two cents.
 

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You need to know what you want to accomplish first. A true HIPO is a very difficult engine to build, expensive on parts, and hard to keep running.
A 289 and 302 block are, for what you are talking about, the same. It is easy to find 302 blocks around. If you have no engine at all, then just ensure the parts you are getting "match" each other. Best example, the 5 bolt vs 6 bolt blocks. If you do not know the difference, ask, and I will give you more details.
All that being said, I have a 65 engine, 6 bolt, with 78K miles, uncut, for $150.
 

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Hi Christopher,

As another poster said what is it you want to accomplish? If you want to duplicate a HIPO it can certainly be done, the HIPO used a standard 289 block and just added some better parts.

That said it will be expensive because most of those parts are NOT produced anywhere - so you will need to buy real HIPO parts to make your copy. That will get pricey very quickly.

You also can build a normally aspirated engine with modern heads, cam, and other goodies that will produce substantially more power than a HIPO duplicate would for less money. See Hoosierbuddy's write-up for an example of the possibilities at http://home.earthlink.net/~pirateship/mopower.htm .

Or you can go the modern route and do an EFI (even a crate motor) and get even power, even easier. Or if you want to go even higher on the power scale go EFI and turbos.

But start by figuring out what you want to do in terms of an end goal, and then choose the best route to get there.

FYI: I live in Sandy and work downtown in SLC, drop me an email or PM through the forum if you would like to meet to discuss options or just say hello.

John Harvey
 

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After going through the whole "build up a badass 289" thing was a lot of fun for me...I'd have to recommend starting with a new roller block rather than a 289. A roller cam is a very nice thing to have and although it is possible to retrofit one to an earlier block, you are limited to small base circle (special) cams and it is an expensive propoisition.

If you want to make serious power conisider going with a 3.25" crank and make yourself a 331 cid stroker.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hello Phil,

I appreciate the response, but most of what you said is Greek to me... What's a roller cam ?? What type of engine/block does that require ??
 

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In 1985, Ford updated their small block castings to accept a taller roller lifter in place of the regular lifters they had used since the engine had been introduced. A roller lifter has a roller that rides along the cam profile. This allows more aggressive (higher performance) cam profiles to be used that results in higher power output (all other things being equal) than a non-roller cam engine.

This is one of the MANY performance enhancements that have been developed for the ford small block since 1967...the last year of the hypo 289.

What I'm getting at here is that a K engine was the king of the streets back in "the day"...but it won't keep up with a well built engine using modern performance parts.

If I had an original K-code car...I'd go with a K-code engine. Building an "imitation K-code (hypo 289) for a non-K car doesn't make much sense given the other choices available now. IMHO.

Phil
 

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just buy a BRAND NEW and fully machined Ford Sporstman block. It's the B50 model.

It come FULLY MACHINED and has the thick 2 bolt main caps like a Hi-Po and has thicker main bearing webs as well.

About $900 you'll be way ahed in quality and hassle factor compared to the all-up cost of preparing a used block properly
 
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