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1966 Mustang Hardtop 289 4 Speed
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Cool! So how exactly did you line up the gasket on the ribbed part?
Cool! So how exactly did you line up the gasket on the ribbed part?
Just use the 4 blue alignment dowels to hold the gasket on the block and put the pan in place making sure the ends are tucked in. You are just over thinking it. Start putting the bolts in place and follow the correct torquing procedure. Do not over tighten the bolts as it will warp the pan. Also, I found I had to put a little dab of sealant on both sides of the sharp corners of the gasket and pan. 2 at the front and 2 at the rear. Don't overdo the sealant, just a little dab will do. Right where I have highlighted in red.

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Heads up... you may want to remove the plastic alignment pins after putting in just 4 bolts near the corners. Then put in the rest of the bolts. Another thread just went up where the OP snapped off a couple of the plastic alignment pins (I'm assuming because when the other bolts were tighten that inadvertently cinched the plastic pins in). At least as you're putting on the pan test that you can easily back out the plastic alignment pins

 

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Discussion Starter #25
Just use the 4 blue alignment dowels to hold the gasket on the block and put the pan in place making sure the ends are tucked in. You are just over thinking it. Start putting the bolts in place and follow the correct torquing procedure. Do not over tighten the bolts as it will warp the pan. Also, I found I had to put a little dab of sealant on both sides of the sharp corners of the gasket and pan. 2 at the front and 2 at the rear. Don't overdo the sealant, just a little dab will do. Right where I have highlighted in red.

View attachment 757332
Thanks that is very helpful! We are still waiting for some new bolts so I will install it sometime next week. I only had one more question, and this question applies to other repairs as well. How can I find the correct tourqe/order for tightening down bolts? Do I need a tourqe wrench?
 

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1966 Mustang Hardtop 289 4 Speed
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All your bolts in hand tight. Start at the center bolts on each side of the pan and work your way out in each direction alternating each side evenly as you go. You have 2 different size bolts in your pan. 1/4-20 is 7-9 ft/lbs and 5/16-18 is 9-11 ft/lbs. Yes a torque wrench will lessen the chance you'll snap one of the bolts off in the block. And it's a huge advantage to buy a copy of the shop manual for your car. They are available in print or digital download from National Parts Depot or just do a google search.
 

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Thanks that is very helpful! We are still waiting for some new bolts so I will install it sometime next week. I only had one more question, and this question applies to other repairs as well. How can I find the correct tourqe/order for tightening down bolts? Do I need a tourqe wrench?
You should get a shop manual for your year mustang. It has all the specs. Per my 1968 shop manual, the torque spec for the pan bolts for a 289/302 is 9-11 ft-lbs. So as not to warp the pan, you should tighten the bolts in two or three stages. Eg 4 ft-lbs, 7 ft-lbs, 10 ft-lbs. And tighten in a criss-cross order from center to corners.

Do you need a torque wrench? The general answer is "yes". You'll need it for other things in the future anyway. But, IMO, while some parts of the engine need exact torque specs, pan bolts are not so critical that you could get by without a torque wrench if you have good "mechanics feel" for how much ~10 ft-lbs is. The main thing is to tighten them all the same amount and not to grossly "gorilla" overtighten them. If you under-tighten them or they loosen you'll just get some leaks and you can do a re-tighten later.

One final suggestion, if you buy only a single torque wrench get one that is in the mid-range (~10 ft-lb to ~120 ft-lb). That will be the most useful for most things in the future. And don't buy the cheapest one you can find pay a bit of premium to get an accurate one.

Shop manual (pdf). You can also order hard copies (just google it).
 

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Torque wrench - absolutely. I was one of the few in my "group" that always followed torque specs and sequences and had the fewest problems with leaking gaskets. I have both a 3/8" and a 1/2" torque wrench. I also have a 1/4" torque meter, but that's for a different purpose. I recommend you invest in a top quality torque wrench, CDI is a Snap On owned company, so you get snap On quality, with normal tool prices. I've had this one for three years and it has not needed any adjustment or calibration.

 

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Discussion Starter #29
Using that gasket I would:

Remove the engine cross member and remover or drop the steering as indicated (DO NOT FORCE YOUR CROSS MEMBER BOLTS. THEY WILL SNAP OFF. IF YOU FEEL YOU NEED A CHEATER OR IMPACT, POST FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS). Also may have to remove the starter.

Remove the old pan, You'll have to wiggle it and move it forward over the steering linkage to get it all the way out.

Clean the block surface completely.

Put black (oil rated) silicon sealant at the "corners" where the arch of the bearing caps meets the flat of the block face.

Install the blue "holders" that come with the gasket and push the gasket into place.

Put more sealant along the entire arched surface of the oil pan (front and back)....I know you shouldn't have to...but the last two I put in leaked there until I did this.

Maneuver pan onto blue holders and push it into position. Hand tighten all bolts. Snug them down a tad and then allow sealant to set for an hour or so. Then torque to spec.

Good luck.

Don't break your crossmember bolts.

Phil
I’m right now installing the new pan, and the cross member has been a pain so far. It is on so tight that it actually cracked one of my 7/8 sockets, so ive had to purchase a new one. What should I do when
Using that gasket I would:

Remove the engine cross member and remover or drop the steering as indicated (DO NOT FORCE YOUR CROSS MEMBER BOLTS. THEY WILL SNAP OFF. IF YOU FEEL YOU NEED A CHEATER OR IMPACT, POST FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS). Also may have to remove the starter.

Remove the old pan, You'll have to wiggle it and move it forward over the steering linkage to get it all the way out.

Clean the block surface completely.

Put black (oil rated) silicon sealant at the "corners" where the arch of the bearing caps meets the flat of the block face.

Install the blue "holders" that come with the gasket and push the gasket into place.

Put more sealant along the entire arched surface of the oil pan (front and back)....I know you shouldn't have to...but the last two I put in leaked there until I did this.

Maneuver pan onto blue holders and push it into position. Hand tighten all bolts. Snug them down a tad and then allow sealant to set for an hour or so. Then torque to spec.

Good luck.

Don't break your crossmember bolts.

Phil
I’m right now in the process of replacing the pan, and as expected the crossmember has been a pain, and it’s in extremely tight. How can I remove it without forcing it?
 

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If your crossmember bolts will not easily come out of the frame nuts, I would suggest a MAPP torch to heat them up red hot and then remove them.

If you break those bolts off in the frame nuts, you are going to wish you didn't. If you broke a socket, you've already pulled on them WAY TOO HARD. I'm very surprised the bolt hasn't already broke off OR busted the weld that keeps the frame nut from spinning inside the frame.

Good Luck!

Phil
 

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+1 on the CDI torque wrenches. Good quality and made in the USA California. :eek::p:ROFLMAO: (for my anti-surfing buddies...)
For $20-30 more than the Quinn or Icon at HF (or the private label big box stores) you can have a click type CDI. A good thing about getting a CDI is that if needed eventually they can recalibrate it. That’s not going to happen with an HF or Craftsman. Although as a home guy the chances of you needing to have it calibrated are pretty slim. Unless you’re working all the time like some of us.

In the >10 lb range the window on the 3/8” is pretty narrow at only about 80 lbs max in most cases. It’s really a job for a 1/4” wrench but that’s going to be even more limited than a narrow window 3/8” if you only have one wrench.

I torque most everything in and on the engine. I also torque suspension, brakes and most of the rest of the drive train. You can snug the pan by hand and you should be OK. Just don’t crush or crimp the gasket.
 
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