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The best way is to move up by me. Its been cold and snowy for way to long. Really though you need to keep the gas line away from or insulated from the heat. There may be other hints, but heat Is one of the causes.
 
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Hi John & Melisha...first i would like to say ..what a beautiful convertable you both have there ..!.. seems to have a better stance than ours..
I am not to sure about the hot water routing that a ford I6 has ..even though we have that type of motor here in australia. But in our General Motors Holden I6 engines of which i have had quite a few.. the manifold had hot radiator water flowing through the bottom of the carb.also on some models a heat tube from the exhaust was passed into the base of the carb as well....!!!! all this was ok during our winters ..but during the summer things always got a little hot.
I noticed you live in AZ. your winters would not be as cold as ours i would not think..anyway this is what i used to do...a little bit of fabrication but solved vapour lock for me...
block of any 'heat' sources to the carb...fab up a aluminium ' heat shield' that fits under the carb that extends forward and to the rear of the engine covering the manifold and exhaust. Leave the shield raw aluminium...it refects heat.. i also made a shield like this that fitted between the fuel pump and the engine...only a thin one ...approx. .8 mil ( about 1/16 "... we have metric here now i sometimes forget). next i fed the fuel line from the inner guard into a 'catch can'- camachinist will know all about this little trick- this can be a plastic, metal or whatever container that you route the fuel line in circles from the bottom to the top of the' can' - for the street i just used water ..racers actually put ice in there ...!!!! and change the ice after every race.. then finally if you can put a fresh air surround from your air filter base to the grill area ...if it is possible...all this is a little extreme i know but as far as iam concerned where you are living - and i have driven through your state on two occasions-these conditions exist in our outback... and i have driven out there on our way to numerious hunting trips..temp. about 44 deg ( approx 110 usa deg's). also look at your thermostat..run one.. dont take it out...and one of my favorite fixes...buy and fit the largest radiator that you can afford..i run what would be your ' limo' radiator...429-460..!!! a little overkil maybe... but i envy you both cruisin' around AZ. (we will be driving thru from CO. to Las Vagas 'bout 20th-22nd april, in our 460 E350 Econoline.. !!!)
Sorry for this long reply but this is how i takled this same problem...especially in such a harsh climate we both have to deal with...
I would be happy to read other VMF'ers opinions on this problem of yours....
Again just my 4 cents worth...the exchange rate here today was 48.80 aussie cents to each american dollar...!!! which means for every $1000 USD we spend next month we have to pay approx..$2080 aussie dollars....OUCH...!
We love visiting your great country and concider it worth every $$$$$.......Good luck
Larry and Christine....
 

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Yeah Larry, you must be a true OF....

I used copper tubing in an insulated aluminum container on my old street racer and early race car engines... and used dry ice (frozen CO2) as the cooling agent...that way, as the dry ice heated, it vaporized....no water mess..

After going to strictly high octane racing gas, I eliminated the cool can.....it didn't really help the car enough to mess with it...

I've found using the phenolic carb spacer goes a long way towards managing heat in the carb...

Glad you're having a good time here....

Pat
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1570936&a=11937754&p=42910787.jpg
 

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I first always use good quality fuel. Second, try to direct the heat away from the lines and carb. Pat's right, a GOOD phenolic spacer will help reduce heat. Also, routing the fuel lines a little farther from the exhaust manifold will help. I have also used pipe insulation with good results and when in a cheap state of mind, have used metal "butterfly" clips (the stainless ones used to hold papers together), clamped to the line as heat sinks.

'66 A-code Fastback (therapy)
'89 Town Car (SWMBO D'driver)
'87 Caprice (as req'd by Hagerty)
 

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Ford routed the gas line prettyclose to the block. On my daughter's '66 I6 coupe the PO installed a glass filter and it would periodically come to rest against the head. On a hot day the car would vapor lock. my solution was to reposition the line an inch away from the engine and get rid of that glass filter. They are unsafe in my experience. Since I made that change, she hasn't had any vapor lock problems.

...modified '65 convertible...
 

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clip a wooden clothes pin on the fuel line near the carb, maybe a couple of'um and see it it goes away

[color:red]1965 A code fastback c4 with factory air ,power steering and front disc, 10/64 build ,a pre GT...GT</font color=red>
[color:green]My web site is [color:purple]here</font color=purple>
http://www.valkyrie.net/~wayne50f1
 
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