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^^^^^^^. Yes, seen many of those bathtub rings. One work-a-round for vacuum filling of the cooling system is to jack up the front end of the car (safely and securely) and fill the radiator with the engine running until it gets hot and starts to overflow the open cap. That's the only other way I know of to get the maximum amount of coolant in the engine without a vacuum.


Z
I install a bleeder (rad drain fitting) into the impeller cavity as vertical as possible solves the issue.
 

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Actually antifreeze does not cool as well as straight water.
Antifreeze raises the boiling point, increased temperature increases cooling efficiency plus the antifreeze additives reduces corrosion. For everyday passenger vehicle anti freeze/coolant is considered to be worthwhile. In many cases engineering involves compromise/mixing of factors, one of which is cost.
 

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Anti freeze may increase the boiling point of water but it decreases the absorption of heat into the coolant. It dosent increase the boiling point that much compared to the rad caps ability to add pressure.

Learned this long ago from a rad shop in fla own by the same family for like 3 generations back in the early 70s. They made me custom radiators.

Things you should know about coolant | hellafunctional

Have done research on this. Ford even brought Evans in for a meeting on possible use of his product in production. At the time I was setting up several different methods of circulating coolant through engines and was invited to the meeting.

Evans waterless coolant, prevent engine overheating
 

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Another factor we do not like to look at is design life.

I used to be in the design phase for electronic components. For example, the production line I managed started about 100,000 cell phone chips per day, the main "brain" of the cell phone. The expected service life of the chips was 3.6 years. They were designed to operate 6.2 years. Virtually none of the failed parts that were examined failed due to the actual chip dying. Most were phones being smashed, water logged, battery overcharged, etc.

The chips were not designed to last a "long" time, 10, 20, 30 years, as there was no benefit to the majority of the customer customer base. To make it last THAT long, the chips would be FAR more expensive, and 0.001% of the population would still be using it after operational life (Slim's picture was displayed in the design lab). Most of the phones were out of service after 2 years, due to loss, damage, or upgrades. It is not to say the part WILL fail, it is just that it is not DESIGNED to last forever.

There are a LOT Of parts on the Mustang, not just aluminum, that had a relatively short design life. Seat belts, for example, are rated at 17 years. They may look good, the MAY work, or they may fail due just being old in a 40 mile per hour crash.

We can engineer a loaf of bread to last 2 years without any special action on the consumer's part. The loaf of bread will cost $17 each. Most people are content to pay $2 a loaf, knowing that it will fail in 3 weeks or less, since they do not plan to have it sit around longer than 3 weeks.
 

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I just replaced my neighbor's timing cover on his kid's 2006 Taurus 6 cyl. It started dripping coolant on Thu for the first time, fortunately while it was home here in Ia from college in KC! I pulled and replaced the aluminum timing cover as it was completely eaten away around the coolant passages. The car only had 130K on it! Then yesterday he brought over his wife's Caravan which also started leaking coolant. I'll be darned if we didn't find the exact same thing- the timing cover leaking! I guess I know what I'll be doing tonight...:shrug:
 

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I just replaced my neighbor's timing cover on his kid's 2006 Taurus 6 cyl. It started dripping coolant on Thu for the first time, fortunately while it was home here in Ia from college in KC! I pulled and replaced the aluminum timing cover as it was completely eaten away around the coolant passages. The car only had 130K on it! Then yesterday he brought over his wife's Caravan which also started leaking coolant. I'll be darned if we didn't find the exact same thing- the timing cover leaking! I guess I know what I'll be doing tonight...:shrug:

Instances like this can also be caused by the metallurgy of the material the parts are made from. Cheep munimula is going to be eaten away much easier. Often the case bean counters not engineering compromise durability of components just to save a couple of cents a part.
 
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