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I'm going to change the oil today in a 66 coupe. All I know about the motor is its a 302. What oil viscosity should I use, how many quarts are needed, and what brand oil and oil filter is good for this motor? Thanks a lot
 

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I'll answer the easy one, 5 quarts.

Most of the others are a matter personal preference. Biggest issue is to make sure you have enoug zinc and phosphorus to properly lubricate your flat tappet cam.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. Also, is there supposed to be an oil pan gasket? Every car I've ever worked on has had one, but this oil pan doesnt have one.
 

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Is 10w30 ok? I live in Dallas, so it's pretty warm here all year.
I guess we can assume you are new at this....changing oil is pretty straight forward.. drain out old, replace with new. Vintage cars...10W - 30W / 40W is the norm....However, new oil formula's have left out some critical ingredients that some older engines need.

Replace your oil with Valvoline Racing Oil or similiar....

Do a search..you will see lots of discussion on the subject.
 

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I'm going to change the oil today in a 66 coupe. All I know about the motor is its a 302. What oil viscosity should I use, how many quarts are needed, and what brand oil and oil filter is good for this motor? Thanks a lot

The standard " 5 quarts" is true with a few exceptions. We need to assume you have a standard oil pan and a standard oil filter (not one or more remotely located). Back in the day some guys changed the filter every other oil change (pretty silly I know) - so that will increase the volume if you were an 'every other' kind of guy. I think its best to check your oil level after you change it at start the engine and let it run for 10 seconds and then reassesss your dipstick and make sure it is within the safe level. As far as oil goes - flat tappets love zinc
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I guess we can assume you are new at this....changing oil is pretty straight forward.. drain out old, replace with new. Vintage cars...10W - 30W / 40W is the norm....However, new oil formula's have left out some critical ingredients that some older engines need.

Replace your oil with Valvoline Racing Oil or similiar....

Do a search..you will see lots of discussion on the subject.
I'm not new at changing oil...
I never changed oil in car from the sixties. I assumed things with these older cars were different...and I was right.
 

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For one thing they are generally a lot easier. 66 didn't have 302 as an option so we can only guess on the year and origin of the engine. 302s in the 68-78 period used 5 quarts if you changed the filter. 10W-30 was recommended when they were new.

Never seen a oil pan of this vintage that didn't originally come with a pan gasket. Sometimes people use RTV type gasket sealer and leave out entirely a particular gasket. This may be what was done.
 

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I have a '95 5.0 HO engine from a Mustang in my '68 coupe. It was done by the previous owner and runs just fine. I am still restoring it and the dipstick tube is there but there is no dipstick. Will the original length dipstick for the '68 with a 302 work for this application? Should I buy a generic dipstick and change the oil and put 5 quarts in and use that to determine when it is full of oil? I have searched and didn't find a post about the correct dipstick to use with a roller 5.0 conversion in a classic.

I hope this isn't a complete thread hijack.

Thanks in advance for responses.
 

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Assuming that you have a standard oil pan, you should get the FelPro one-piece gasket (part #OS13260T). It's got the best seal and is the least likely to leak. It even has these handy little pins that help you install the gasket easily, which is great. $30 at RockAuto. Stick a bit of gasket sealer on the end corners and you're set.

As for oil, pretty much most people go with 10W-30 conventional. The important part is to make sure you're getting enough ZDDP - that means you either need to look for one that specifically states that it has higher levels (2000ppm, if I'm not mistaken? someone correct me if I'm wrong) OR get an additive like Cam Shield.

Personally, I use Valvoline VR1 Racing 10W-30 conventional oil. Runs me 5 bucks a quart and has everything I need. Plus, conventionals are less 'slippery' than synthetics so they aren't as likely to squeak out of tiny gaps.
 

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I'm a big fan of Royal Purple. I agree about the FelPro gasket! Here are a few answers from their FAQs.


Can your motor oils be used in older engines?
Yes. Mileage and/or age is not a factor when used in a mechanically sound engine. In high-mileage applications, we do recommend running a minimum of two short (3,000 mile/5,000Km) intervals before extending the oil drain intervals. This will enable Royal Purple’s high solvency to remove existing deposits gradually; such deposits can restrict oil flow, if excessive, as well as reduce the oil service life significantly.


Will synthetic oil cause my engine to leak?
Properly formulated synthetic oils will generally not cause an engine oil leak. Synthetic oils possess a higher degree of natural solvency, which can clean and remove deposits left by previous oils. The removal of extensive oil deposits can expose marginal or damaged oil seals, which may then leak. If an engine currently has excessive oil consumption (i.e. greater than 1 quart / 1,000 miles) the recommended course of action is to solve the oil consumption problem before switching to a synthetic.


Should I use an oil additive with Royal Purple?
No. We strongly recommend against using any oil additives as do most automotive manufacturers. Engine oils are formulated with a fine balance of additives (anti-foam, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear, detergent / dispersants, oxidation inhibitors), and more is not necessarily better. The use of an oil additive could upset the balance resulting in reduced performance.


Do your motor oils contain zinc and phosphorous?
Yes. All Royal Purple engine oils contain the zinc/phosphorous compound zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) and are suitable for both roller and flat tappet valve trains.


Can your oil be used with flat tappet cams?
Yes. For stock or mildly modified flat tappet valve trains (<.525” lift), we recommend our SAE 10W40, 15W40 or 20W50 engine oils. In applications with flat tappet valve trains using high-lift cams and/or high RPM applications, we strongly recommend upgrading to our XPR line of engine oils as these have an even greater concentration of ZDDP providing excellent protection with the higher spring pressures. For a viscosity recommendation, contact our Tech Dept. at 888-382-6300.
 

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I have a '95 5.0 HO engine from a Mustang in my '68 coupe. It was done by the previous owner and runs just fine. I am still restoring it and the dipstick tube is there but there is no dipstick. Will the original length dipstick for the '68 with a 302 work for this application? Should I buy a generic dipstick and change the oil and put 5 quarts in and use that to determine when it is full of oil? I have searched and didn't find a post about the correct dipstick to use with a roller 5.0 conversion in a classic.

I hope this isn't a complete thread hijack.

Thanks in advance for responses.
I have a similar setup. I have a 5.0 roller, the dipstick is on the side of the block coming up behind the headers. I bought a dipstick for a 89 5 liter, drained the oil changed the filter. Put 4 quarts in, made a mark with a dremel, put 5 quarts in, made a mark with the dremel. I put between 4.5-5 quarts in on oil changes. I have a m2 front end and rear sump pan however. If you have a front sump pan, you need the timing cover dipstick and dipstick tube....

Assuming you get the right tube and dipstick, the markings should line up fine. If not, fill it up and mark it like above.

Jafo
 

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Can you post a picture of your pan? As slim says, the 66 didn't come with a 302 so what year, and what modifications it has, are an unknown. If it has a front sump, it may take 7 quarts.
 

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I have a similar setup. I have a 5.0 roller, the dipstick is on the side of the block coming up behind the headers. I bought a dipstick for a 89 5 liter, drained the oil changed the filter. Put 4 quarts in, made a mark with a dremel, put 5 quarts in, made a mark with the dremel. I put between 4.5-5 quarts in on oil changes. I have a m2 front end and rear sump pan however. If you have a front sump pan, you need the timing cover dipstick and dipstick tube....

Assuming you get the right tube and dipstick, the markings should line up fine. If not, fill it up and mark it like above.

Jafo
Excellent idea. I will just get a dipstick and do some trial and error. Your way makes alot of sense.
 

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It really depends on your oil pan. It doesnt matter if it is a 289 or 302 block.
If you have a modern 5.0 you would still have the original oil pan, probably.
These guys can tell you immediatly with a pic.

I use any 10w-30(in Colorado) and I prefer Lucas ZDDP additive but there are many posts here about peoples favorite oil or additive. Just make sure it has Zink=ZDDP.
 
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