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Hello,

I recently installed a Classic Auto Air system in my 65 coupe. It went real smooth, I'd recommend the kit. Anyway, how much R134 should be charged into the system? My mechanic took a guestimation and put one pound in. It blows cool, but not really cold in the 80 degree Arizona weather we had today. I didn't know if anyone could give us some insight.

Thanks,
John Thomas

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Typically if I remember right, you'll have about a 30 degree drop across the evaporator, so 100 degree air coming in, will drop to 70 degrees coming out. Eventually it'll drop down to a comfortable level. Also R134A isn't as efficient as good old R12.

If you have a sight glass, you can back-yard it and add refrigerant untill the bubbles stop. They should have given you the correct amount for the charge for that system or some specs as far as superheat temps ect.

Do you have tinted windows? Otherwise the heat gain my be greater than thee unit can handle.

Tom
You can do anything you want to......ONCE!
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I had my aerostar converted to 134a last summer, and it takes it a good while to cool off. And it never blows ice cold. Thank our wonderful government for doing away with r12. ALL TO [email protected]#L WITH THE EPA!!!!!!! I mean ALL HALE THE EPA!!!!!

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The "backyard" way to add refrigerant is to allow the refrigerant to flow until the suction line begins to "sweat" from condensation. The best way to fill your unit is by using a manifold gauge with compound gauges that show the temp of the refrigerant for R-134A. The temp delta mentioned earlier in another post was slightly off. Instead of 30 the evap in out delta should be around 20 degrees. Just shoot some juice into the system until the "cold" line starts to sweat. It will be fine.
 

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Call Al at Classic Auto Air!!!!! The compressor has a certain amount of oil in it on delivery and the system uses a specific amount of R-134a depending on the compressor and evaporator that you are using. DO NOT overcharge the system or you might be buying another compressor. Spend $ 1.00 on the phone and save yourself a bundle. The guys at Classic are both knowledgeable and helpful. DON'T Guess. Good Luck.

65 Conv., 65 & 66 Coupes and the remains of
a 66' Coupe with 6 cyl. engine and V-8 3 spd.
 

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80 degrees ?? JEEZ!!!
Rule of thumb for R-134a is 80% of the original R-12 capacity. So if the system took 2 pounds (32 oz) of R-12, then install 25 ounces of R-134a. New systems designed for R-134a will state how much refrigerant to install. R-134a runs at a higher pressure and temp than R-12 so don't overfill.

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